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Article:Comet Hale–Bopp
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m (r2.7.2+) (Robot: Modifying no:Hale–Bopp)
(Early observation)
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The comet may have been observed by ancient Egyptians during the reign of pharaoh [[Pepi I]] (2332–2283 BC). In Pepi's pyramid in [[Saqqara]] is a text referring to an "nhh-star" as a companion of the pharaoh in the heavens, where "nhh" is the hieroglyph for long hair.<ref>"The Lost Tomb", [[Kent Weeks]], ISBN 0-297-81847-3, page 198</ref>
 
The comet may have been observed by ancient Egyptians during the reign of pharaoh [[Pepi I]] (2332–2283 BC). In Pepi's pyramid in [[Saqqara]] is a text referring to an "nhh-star" as a companion of the pharaoh in the heavens, where "nhh" is the hieroglyph for long hair.<ref>"The Lost Tomb", [[Kent Weeks]], ISBN 0-297-81847-3, page 198</ref>
   
== Early observation ==
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Hale–Bopp's orbital position was calculated as 7.2&nbsp;[[astronomical units]] (AU) from the Sun, placing it between [[Jupiter]] and [[Saturn]] and by far the greatest distance from Earth at which a comet had been discovered by amateurs.<ref>{{cite journal|title=Comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) | url=http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/mpec/J95/J95P01.html | last=Marsden | first= B. G. | authorlink= Brian G. Marsden| year = 1995 | journal = Minor Planet Electronic Circular | volume=1995-P05}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal|title=Evolution of a Spiral Jet in the Inner Coma of Comet Hale-Bopp (1995 O1)| url=http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/310008 | first= M. R. | last =Kidger | doi=10.1086/310008 | journal = The Astrophysical Journal Letters | year=1996 | volume=461|issue=2| pages=L119–L122|last2=Serra-Ricart|first2=Miquel|last3=Bellot-Rubio|first3=Luis R.|last4=Casas|first4=Ricard | bibcode=1996ApJ...461L.119K}}</ref> Most comets at this distance are extremely faint, and show no discernible activity, but Hale–Bopp already had an observable [[coma (cometary)|coma]].<ref name="Circ6187"/> An image taken at the [[Anglo-Australian Telescope]] in 1993 was found to show the then-unnoticed comet some 13&nbsp;AU from the sun,<ref>{{cite web|last = McNaught| first = R. H. | coauthors = West, R. M.| title = Circular No. 6198| url=http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/iauc/06100/06198.html|publisher=[[International Astronomical Union|IAU]] | date = August 2, 1995 |accessdate=2011-07-05}}</ref> a distance at which most comets are essentially unobservable. ([[Comet Halley|Halley's Comet]] was more than 100 times fainter at the same distance from the Sun.)<ref>{{cite journal | last=Biver | first=N. | title = Substantial outgassing of CO from Comet Hale–Bopp at large heliocentric distance | url=http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v380/n6570/abs/380137a0.html | journal = Nature | volume=380 | pages = 137–139 | year=1996 | doi=10.1038/380137a0 | pmid=8600385 | issue=6570 | last2=Rauer | first2=H | last3=Despois | first3=D | last4=Moreno | first4=R | last5=Paubert | first5=G | last6=Bockelée-Morvan | first6=D | last7=Colom | first7=P | last8=Crovisier | first8=J | last9=Gérard | first9=E|bibcode = 1996Natur.380..137B }}</ref> Analysis indicated later that its [[comet nucleus]] was 60±20&nbsp;kilometres in diameter, approximately six times the size of [[Halley's Comet|Halley]].<ref name=jpldata/><ref name="Fernandez2002" />
 
 
Its great distance and surprising activity indicated that comet Hale–Bopp might become very bright indeed when it reached perihelion in 1997. However, comet scientists were wary – comets can be extremely unpredictable, and many have large outbursts at great distance only to diminish in brightness later. [[Comet Kohoutek]] in 1973 had been touted as a 'comet of the century' and turned out to be unspectacular.<ref name="TimeDiscovery"/>
 
   
 
== Perihelion ==
 
== Perihelion ==
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