ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Viewing 1434101

Navigation

ID: 1434101
User: 173.71.64.170
Article: Oak
Diff:
(Undid revision 532174233 by 82.46.206.212 we don't link non-existing articles in see also - there is no use)
(Hybridization)
Line 42: Line 42:
 
==Hybridization==
 
==Hybridization==
 
[[File:Quercus stellata.jpg|thumb|A hybrid white oak, possibly ''[[Post oak|Quercus stellata]]'' × ''[[Chinkapin oak|Q. muhlenbergii]]'']]
 
[[File:Quercus stellata.jpg|thumb|A hybrid white oak, possibly ''[[Post oak|Quercus stellata]]'' × ''[[Chinkapin oak|Q. muhlenbergii]]'']]
[[Hybrid (biology)|Interspecific hybridization]] is quite common among oaks but usually between species within the same section only and most common in the white oak group (subgenus ''Quercus'', section ''Quercus''; see [[List of Quercus species|'''List of ''Quercus'' species''']]). Inter-section hybrids, except between species of sections ''Quercus'' and ''Mesobalanus'', are unknown. Recent systematic studies appear to confirm a high tendency of ''Quercus'' species to hybridize because of a combination of factors. White oaks are unable to discriminate against pollination by other species in the same section. Because they are [[anemophily|wind pollinated]] and they have weak internal barriers to hybridization, hybridization produces functional seeds and fertile hybrid offspring.<ref name="autogenerated1"/> Ecological stresses, especially near habitat margins, can also cause a breakdown of mate recognition as well as a reduction of male function (pollen quantity and quality) in one parent species.<ref name="autogenerated1" /><ref name="autogenerated2"/>
+
[[Hybrid (biology)|Interspecific pie rocks hybridization]] is quite common among oaks but usually between species within the same section only and most common in the white oak group (subgenus ''Quercus'', section ''Quercus''; see [[List of Quercus species|'''List of ''Quercus'' species''']]). Inter-section hybrids, except between species of sections ''Quercus'' and ''Mesobalanus'', are unknown. Recent systematic studies appear to confirm a high tendency of ''Quercus'' species to hybridize because of a combination of factors. White oaks are unable to discriminate against pollination by other species in the same section. Because they are [[anemophily|wind pollinated]] and they have weak internal barriers to hybridization, hybridization produces functional seeds and fertile hybrid offspring.<ref name="autogenerated1"/> Ecological stresses, especially near habitat margins, can also cause a breakdown of mate recognition as well as a reduction of male function (pollen quantity and quality) in one parent species.<ref name="autogenerated1" /><ref name="autogenerated2"/>
   
 
Frequent hybridization among oaks has consequences for oak populations around the world; most notably, hybridization has produced large populations of hybrids with copious amounts of [[introgression]], and the [[evolution (biology)|evolution]] of new species.<ref name=r2/> Frequent hybridization and high levels of introgression have caused different species in the same populations to share up to 50% of their genetic information.<ref name=r3/> Having high rates of hybridization and introgression produces genetic data that often does not differentiate between two clearly morphologically distinct species, but instead differentiates populations.<ref name=r4/> Numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain how oak species are able to remain morphologically and ecologically distinct with such high levels of [[gene flow]], but the phenomenon is still largely a mystery to botanists.
 
Frequent hybridization among oaks has consequences for oak populations around the world; most notably, hybridization has produced large populations of hybrids with copious amounts of [[introgression]], and the [[evolution (biology)|evolution]] of new species.<ref name=r2/> Frequent hybridization and high levels of introgression have caused different species in the same populations to share up to 50% of their genetic information.<ref name=r3/> Having high rates of hybridization and introgression produces genetic data that often does not differentiate between two clearly morphologically distinct species, but instead differentiates populations.<ref name=r4/> Numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain how oak species are able to remain morphologically and ecologically distinct with such high levels of [[gene flow]], but the phenomenon is still largely a mystery to botanists.
Reason: ANN scored at 0.970167
Reporter Information
Reporter: Anonymous (anonymous)
Date: Friday, the 15th of July 2016 at 05:39:57 AM
Status: Reported
Friday, the 15th of July 2016 at 05:39:57 AM #105120
Anonymous (anonymous)

o5xIDK <a href="http://dkzpieorkbwr.com/">dkzpieorkbwr</a>, [url=http://wjirnltzlmcm.com/]wjirnltzlmcm[/url], [link=http://rzzvwbxvgggc.com/]rzzvwbxvgggc[/link], http://dmlrojezxcxm.com/

Username:
Comment: