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ID: 1587028
User: 169.204.230.154
Article: Robert Gray (sea captain)
Diff:
(At Nootka Sound)
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=== At Nootka Sound ===
 
=== At Nootka Sound ===
On July 22, 1792 Gray sailed the ''Columbia'' into the Nootka Sound accompanied by the ''Hope'' under Ingraham. [[Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra]] was present as the commandant of the Spanish settlement there. Bodega was awaiting the arrival of [[George Vancouver]] so that the two could implement the first [[Nootka Convention]]. Bodega had intended to turn over the entire establishment to Vancouver, but while waiting for Vancouver he began to change his mind. Over the summer Bodega had begun to realize that [[John Meares]] had not only greatly exaggerated his losses during the Nootka Crisis, but had illegally operated British trading ships under the flag of Portugal. When Gray and Ingraham arrived at Nootka Vancouver was still en route. Bodega took the opportunity to ask the Americans if they would give him their account of the events of 1789 that led to the Nootka Crisis. Ingraham answered Bodega's letter at length. He wrote, "as I knew every circumstance, Captain Gray desired I would answer and he would sign it jointly."<ref name=tovell>{{cite book |last= Tovell |first= Freeman M. |title= At the Far Reaches of Empire: The Life of Juan Francisco De La Bodega Y Quadra |publisher= University of British Columbia Press |year= 2008 |isbn= 978-0-7748-1367-9 |url= http://books.google.com/?id=E8_LXicsIlEC |pages= 205–209, 227}}</ref>
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On July 22, 1792 Gray sailed the ''Columbia'' into the Nootka Sound accompanied by the ''Hope'' under Ingraham. [[Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra]] wa hi my name is trevor swag swag swag present as the commandant of the Spanish settlement there. Bodega was awaiting the arrival of [[George Vancouver]] so that the two could implement the first [[Nootka Convention]]. Bodega had intended to turn over the entire establishment to Vancouver, but while waiting for Vancouver he began to change his mind. Over the summer Bodega had begun to realize that [[John Meares]] had not only greatly exaggerated his losses during the Nootka Crisis, but had illegally operated British trading ships under the flag of Portugal. When Gray and Ingraham arrived at Nootka Vancouver was still en route. Bodega took the opportunity to ask the Americans if they would give him their account of the events of 1789 that led to the Nootka Crisis. Ingraham answered Bodega's letter at length. He wrote, "as I knew every circumstance, Captain Gray desired I would answer and he would sign it jointly."<ref name=tovell>{{cite book |last= Tovell |first= Freeman M. |title= At the Far Reaches of Empire: The Life of Juan Francisco De La Bodega Y Quadra |publisher= University of British Columbia Press |year= 2008 |isbn= 978-0-7748-1367-9 |url= http://books.google.com/?id=E8_LXicsIlEC |pages= 205–209, 227}}</ref>
   
 
According to the letter signed by Ingraham and Gray, Meares had made many false claims about the events of 1789. The Portuguese ships, Ingraham said, were definitely British ships pretending to be Portuguese. The "house" that Meares said he built at Nootka Sound, and which was explicitly mentioned in the Nootka Convention, was only a "rough hut", built and torn down in 1788. By 1789, when the Spanish arrived, "there was no vestige of any house remaining". The Nootka Convention said that Spain had seized buildings and that these must be restored to Britain. Further, Ingraham wrote that Meares not purchased any land from [[Maquinna]], as claimed. About the arrest of [[James Colnett]] by [[Esteban José Martínez Fernández y Martínez de la Sierra|Esteban José Martínez]], Ingraham and Gray wrote that Colnett had insulted and threatened Martínez, and that Colnett had drawn his sword on Martínez, justifying Colnett's arrest. The letter closed with a statement of friendship: "We sincerely hope, sir, when things are represented with truth, it will rescue our friend Don Estevan J. Martínez from censure... As to the treatment of the Americans by Don Estevan, we have ever testified to it in terms due to such hospitality, and we are again happy to have it in our power to do what we deem justice to his conduct." It should be noted that the Americans were not a neutral party. The United States had only gained its independence from Britain through war a few years before. Also, the Americans were in direct competition with the British, but not the Spanish, for the fur trade of the North West coast. It was in their interest to support the Spanish case.<ref name=tovell/>
 
According to the letter signed by Ingraham and Gray, Meares had made many false claims about the events of 1789. The Portuguese ships, Ingraham said, were definitely British ships pretending to be Portuguese. The "house" that Meares said he built at Nootka Sound, and which was explicitly mentioned in the Nootka Convention, was only a "rough hut", built and torn down in 1788. By 1789, when the Spanish arrived, "there was no vestige of any house remaining". The Nootka Convention said that Spain had seized buildings and that these must be restored to Britain. Further, Ingraham wrote that Meares not purchased any land from [[Maquinna]], as claimed. About the arrest of [[James Colnett]] by [[Esteban José Martínez Fernández y Martínez de la Sierra|Esteban José Martínez]], Ingraham and Gray wrote that Colnett had insulted and threatened Martínez, and that Colnett had drawn his sword on Martínez, justifying Colnett's arrest. The letter closed with a statement of friendship: "We sincerely hope, sir, when things are represented with truth, it will rescue our friend Don Estevan J. Martínez from censure... As to the treatment of the Americans by Don Estevan, we have ever testified to it in terms due to such hospitality, and we are again happy to have it in our power to do what we deem justice to his conduct." It should be noted that the Americans were not a neutral party. The United States had only gained its independence from Britain through war a few years before. Also, the Americans were in direct competition with the British, but not the Spanish, for the fur trade of the North West coast. It was in their interest to support the Spanish case.<ref name=tovell/>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.85817
Reporter Information
Reporter: 978 (anonymous)
Date: Saturday, the 9th of July 2016 at 03:54:30 PM
Status: Reported
Saturday, the 9th of July 2016 at 03:54:30 PM #105032
978 (anonymous)

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