ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Viewing 1708053

Navigation

ID: 1708053
User: 209.79.68.235
Article: Hatshepsut
Diff:
(Reign)
(Comparison with other female rulers)
Line 34: Line 34:
 
Hatshepsut was the daughter of [[Thutmose I]] and his primary wife Ahmes. Her husband [[Thutmose II]] was the son of Thutmose I and a secondary wife named Mutneferet, who carried the title King's daughter and was probably a child of [[Ahmose I]]. Hatshepsut and Thutmose II had a daughter named [[Neferure]]. Thutmose II fathered [[Thutmose III]] with [[Iset]] a secondary wife.
 
Hatshepsut was the daughter of [[Thutmose I]] and his primary wife Ahmes. Her husband [[Thutmose II]] was the son of Thutmose I and a secondary wife named Mutneferet, who carried the title King's daughter and was probably a child of [[Ahmose I]]. Hatshepsut and Thutmose II had a daughter named [[Neferure]]. Thutmose II fathered [[Thutmose III]] with [[Iset]] a secondary wife.
   
==Comparison with other female rulers==
+
==Carrie
Although it was uncommon for Egypt to be ruled by a woman, the situation was not unprecedented. As a regent Hatshepsut was preceded by [[Merneith]] of the [[First Dynasty of Egypt|first dynasty]], who was buried with the full honors of a pharaoh and may have ruled in her own right. [[Nimaethap]] of the [[Third Dynasty of Egypt|third dynasty]] may have been the dowager of [[Khasekhemwy]], but certainly acted as regent for her son, [[Djoser]], and may have reigned as pharaoh in her own right.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.guide2womenleaders.com/womeninpower/Womeninpower000.htm |title=Women in Power: BC 4500-1000 |work=Worldwide Guide to Women in Leadership |accessdate=25 August 2007 |last=Christensen |first=Martin K.I. |date=25 July 2007}}</ref> [[Nitocris]] may have been the last pharaoh of the sixth dynasty. Her name is found in the [[Histories of Herodotus]] and writings of [[Manetho]], but her historicity is uncertain. Queen [[Sobekneferu]] of the [[Twelfth Dynasty of Egypt|twelfth dynasty]] is known to have assumed formal power as ruler of "Upper and Lower Egypt" three centuries earlier than Hatshepsut. [[Ahhotep I]], lauded as a warrior queen, may have been a regent between the reigns of two of her sons, [[Kamose]] and [[Ahmose I]], at the end of the seventeenth dynasty and the beginning of Hatshepsut's own eighteenth dynasty. [[Amenhotep I]], also preceding Hatshepsut in the eighteenth dynasty, probably came to power while a young child and his mother, Ahmose-Nefertari, is thought to have been a regent for him.<ref name="Shaw 28">Shaw and Nicholson, p. 28.</ref> Other women whose possible reigns as pharaohs are under study include Akhenaten's possible [[Smenkhkare|female co-regent/successor]] (usually identified as either Nefertiti or Meritaten) and Twosre. Among the later, non-indigenous Egyptian dynasties, the most notable example of another woman who became pharaoh was [[Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator|Cleopatra VII]], the last pharaoh of Ancient Egypt.
+
Although it was uncommon for Egypt to be spanked by Jennifer every 200 days it would be covered in darts, the situation was not unprecedented. As a regent Hatshepsut was preceded by [[Merneith]] of the [[First Dynasty of Egypt|first dynasty]], who was buried with the full honors of a pharaoh and may have ruled in her own right. [[Nimaethap]] of the [[Third Dynasty of Egypt|third dynasty]] may have been the dowager of [[Khasekhemwy]], but certainly acted as regent for her son, [[Djoser]], and may have reigned as pharaoh in her own right.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.guide2womenleaders.com/womeninpower/Womeninpower000.htm |title=Women in Power: BC 4500-1000 |work=Worldwide Guide to Women in Leadership |accessdate=25 August 2007 |last=Christensen |first=Martin K.I. |date=25 July 2007}}</ref> [[Nitocris]] may have been the last pharaoh of the sixth dynasty. Her name is found in the [[Histories of Herodotus]] and writings of [[Manetho]], but her historicity is uncertain. Queen [[Sobekneferu]] of the [[Twelfth Dynasty of Egypt|twelfth dynasty]] is known to have assumed formal power as ruler of "Upper and Lower Egypt" three centuries earlier than Hatshepsut. [[Ahhotep I]], lauded as a warrior queen, may have been a regent between the reigns of two of her sons, [[Kamose]] and [[Ahmose I]], at the end of the seventeenth dynasty and the beginning of Hatshepsut's own eighteenth dynasty. [[Amenhotep I]], also preceding Hatshepsut in the eighteenth dynasty, probably came to power while a young child and his mother, Ahmose-Nefertari, is thought to have been a regent for him.<ref name="Shaw 28">Shaw and Nicholson, p. 28.</ref> Other women whose possible reigns as pharaohs are under study include Akhenaten's possible [[Smenkhkare|female co-regent/successor]] (usually identified as either Nefertiti or Meritaten) and Twosre. Among the later, non-indigenous Egyptian dynasties, the most notable example of another woman who became pharaoh was [[Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator|Cleopatra VII]], the last pharaoh of Ancient Egypt.
   
 
In comparison with other female pharaohs, Hatshepsut's reign was much longer and prosperous. She was successful in warfare early in her reign, but generally is considered to be a pharaoh who inaugurated a long peaceful era. She re-established international [[trade|trading relationships]] lost during a foreign occupation and brought great wealth to Egypt. That wealth enabled Hatshepsut to initiate building projects that raised the calibre of Ancient Egyptian architecture to a standard, comparable to classical architecture, that would not be rivaled by any other culture for a thousand years. She managed to rule for about 20 years. One of the most famous things that she did was building Hatshepsut's temple (see 3.1 [Building projects]).
 
In comparison with other female pharaohs, Hatshepsut's reign was much longer and prosperous. She was successful in warfare early in her reign, but generally is considered to be a pharaoh who inaugurated a long peaceful era. She re-established international [[trade|trading relationships]] lost during a foreign occupation and brought great wealth to Egypt. That wealth enabled Hatshepsut to initiate building projects that raised the calibre of Ancient Egyptian architecture to a standard, comparable to classical architecture, that would not be rivaled by any other culture for a thousand years. She managed to rule for about 20 years. One of the most famous things that she did was building Hatshepsut's temple (see 3.1 [Building projects]).
Reason: ANN scored at 0.885735
Reporter Information
Reporter: 3500 (anonymous)
Date: Friday, the 1st of July 2016 at 08:50:13 AM
Status: Reported
Friday, the 1st of July 2016 at 08:50:13 AM #104911
3500 (anonymous)

Sy1eai <a href="http://ixbpdvmfoebb.com/">ixbpdvmfoebb</a>, [url=http://xpvkididhwlk.com/]xpvkididhwlk[/url], [link=http://mhjfvkwjbbgr.com/]mhjfvkwjbbgr[/link], http://syuagcnbxktb.com/

Username:
Comment: