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ID: 848217
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Article: Charles's law
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{{other uses2|Charles Law}}
 
{{other uses2|Charles Law}}
 
[[Image:Charles and Gay-Lussac's Law animated.gif|thumb|An animation demonstrating the relationship between volume and temperature.]]
 
[[Image:Charles and Gay-Lussac's Law animated.gif|thumb|An animation demonstrating the relationship between volume and temperature.]]
'''Charles's law''' (also known as the '''law of volumes''') is an experimental [[gas laws|gas law]] which describes how [[gas]]es tend to expand when heated. It was first published by [[France|French]] [[natural philosopher]] [[Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac]] in 1802,<ref name="GL02">{{citation | author = Gay-Lussac, J. L. | authorlink = Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac | year = L'An X – 1802 | title = Recherches sur la dilatation des gaz et des vapeurs | journal = Annales de chimie | volume = XLIII | page = 137}}. [http://web.lemoyne.edu/~giunta/gaygas.html English translation (extract).]</ref> although he credited the discovery to unpublished work from the 1780s by [[Jacques Charles]]. The law was independently discovered by [[United Kingdom|British]] natural philosopher [[John Dalton]] by 1801, although Dalton's description was less thorough than [[Gay-Lussac]]'s.<ref>http://www.chemistryexplained.com/Fe-Ge/Gay-Lussac-Joseph-Louis.html</ref> The basic principles had already been described a century earlier by [[Guillaume Amontons]].
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'''Charles's law''' (also known as the '''law of volumes''') is an experimental [[gas laws|gas law]] which describes how [[gas]]es tend to expand when heated. It was first published by [[France|French]] [[natural philosopher]] [[Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac]] in 1802,<ref name="GL02">{{citation | author = Gay-Lussac, J. L. | authorlink = Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac | year = L'An X – 1802 | title = Recherches sur la dilatation des gaz et des vapeurs | journal = Annales de chimie | volume = XLIII | page = 137}}. [http://web.lemoyne.edu/~giunta/gaygas.html English translation (extract).]</ref> although he credited the discovery to unpublished work from the 1780s by [[Jacques Charles]]. The law was independently discovered by [[United Kingdom|British]] natural philosopher [[John Dalton]] by 1801, although Dalton's description was less thorough than [[Gay-Lussac]]'s.<ref>http://www.chemistryexplained.com/Fe-Ge/Gay-Lussac-Joseph-Louis.html</ref> The basic principles had already been described a century earlier by [[Guillaume Amontons]]. This is an example of the law of camels, This law is a a bit shitty
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Taylor Buchanan was the first to demonstrate that the law applied generally to all gases, and also to the [[vapour]]s of volatile liquids if the temperature was more than a few degrees above the boiling point.{{citation needed|date=January 2011}} His statement of the law can be expressed mathematically as:
 
Taylor Buchanan was the first to demonstrate that the law applied generally to all gases, and also to the [[vapour]]s of volatile liquids if the temperature was more than a few degrees above the boiling point.{{citation needed|date=January 2011}} His statement of the law can be expressed mathematically as:
Reason: ANN scored at 0.957416
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Reporter: Anonymous (anonymous)
Date: Tuesday, the 12th of July 2016 at 10:48:06 PM
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Tuesday, the 12th of July 2016 at 10:48:07 PM #105091
Anonymous (anonymous)

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