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Article:Blue moon
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[[File:December 2009 partrial lunar eclipse-cropped.png|thumb|250px|[[December 2009 lunar eclipse|31 December 2009]] Blue Moon with partial [[lunar eclipse]]]]
 
[[File:December 2009 partrial lunar eclipse-cropped.png|thumb|250px|[[December 2009 lunar eclipse|31 December 2009]] Blue Moon with partial [[lunar eclipse]]]]
   
A '''blue moon''' can refer to the third [[full moon]] in a [[season]] with four full moons.<ref name="SkyTel">{{cite web |last=Sinnott |first=Roger W., Donald W. Olson, and Richard Tresch Fienberg|url=http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/moon/3304131.html?showAll=y&c=y|title=What's a Blue Moon? |publisher=''[[Sky & Telescope]]'' |month=May |year=1999 |accessdate=2008-02-09 |quote=The trendy definition of "blue Moon" as the second full Moon in a month is a mistake.}}</ref> Most years have twelve full moons that occur approximately monthly. In addition to those twelve full lunar cycles, each solar calendar year contains roughly eleven days more than the lunar year of 12 [[lunation]]s. The extra days accumulate, so every two or three years (7 times in the 19-year [[Metonic cycle]]), there is an extra full moon. [[Lunisolar calendar]]s have rules about when to insert such an [[Intercalation|intercalary]] or ''embolismic'' ("leap") month, and what name it is given; ''e.g.'' in the [[Hebrew calendar]] the month Adar is duplicated. The term "blue moon" comes from folklore. Different traditions and conventions place the extra "blue" full moon at different times in the year.
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A '''blue moon''' can refer to the second [[full moon]] in a [[season]] with four full moons.<ref name="SkyTel">{{cite web |last=Sinnott |first=Roger W., Donald W. Olson, and Richard Tresch Fienberg|url=http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/moon/3304131.html?showAll=y&c=y|title=What's a Blue Moon? |publisher=''[[Sky & Telescope]]'' |month=May |year=1999 |accessdate=2008-02-09 |quote=The trendy definition of "blue Moon" as the second full Moon in a month is a mistake.}}</ref> Most years have twelve full moons that occur approximately monthly. In addition to those twelve full lunar cycles, each solar calendar year contains roughly eleven days more than the lunar year of 12 [[lunation]]s. The extra days accumulate, so every two or three years (7 times in the 19-year [[Metonic cycle]]), there is an extra full moon. [[Lunisolar calendar]]s have rules about when to insert such an [[Intercalation|intercalary]] or ''embolismic'' ("leap") month, and what name it is given; ''e.g.'' in the [[Hebrew calendar]] the month Adar is duplicated. The term "blue moon" comes from folklore. Different traditions and conventions place the extra "blue" full moon at different times in the year.
   
 
* In calculating the dates for [[Lent]] and [[Easter]], the Clergy identify the Lent Moon. It is thought that historically when the moon's timing was too early, they named an earlier moon as a "betrayer moon" (''belewe'' moon), thus the Lent moon came at its expected time.<ref name="belewe">{{cite web |url=http://www.farmersalmanac.com/what-is-a-blue-moon |title=What is a "Blue Moon"? |publisher=[[Farmers' Almanac]]}}</ref>
 
* In calculating the dates for [[Lent]] and [[Easter]], the Clergy identify the Lent Moon. It is thought that historically when the moon's timing was too early, they named an earlier moon as a "betrayer moon" (''belewe'' moon), thus the Lent moon came at its expected time.<ref name="belewe">{{cite web |url=http://www.farmersalmanac.com/what-is-a-blue-moon |title=What is a "Blue Moon"? |publisher=[[Farmers' Almanac]]}}</ref>
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