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ID:1528267
User:24.102.47.58
Article:I Have a Dream
Diff:
m (Reverted edits by 70.54.106.193 (talk) to last revision by Kevin W. (HG))
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[[File:IhaveadreamMarines.jpg|thumb|right|250px|View from the [[Lincoln Memorial]] toward the [[Washington Monument]] on August 28, 1963]]
 
[[File:IhaveadreamMarines.jpg|thumb|right|250px|View from the [[Lincoln Memorial]] toward the [[Washington Monument]] on August 28, 1963]]
 
[[Image:i-have-a-dream-site.jpg|thumb|right|250px|The location on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial from which King delivered the speech is commemorated with this inscription]]
 
[[Image:i-have-a-dream-site.jpg|thumb|right|250px|The location on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial from which King delivered the speech is commemorated with this inscription]]
The [[March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom]] was partly intended to demonstrate mass support for the [[Civil Rights Act of 1964|civil rights legislation]] proposed by President Kennedy in June. King and other leaders therefore agreed to keep their speeches calm, and to avoid provoking the [[civil disobedience]] which had become the hallmark of the civil rights movement. King originally designed his speech as a homage to [[Abraham Lincoln]]'s Gettysburg Address, timed to correspond with the 100-year centennial of the [[Emancipation Proclamation]].<ref name=Mills>Nicolaus Mills, "What Really Happened at the March on Washington?", ''Dissent'', Summer 1988; reprinted in ''Civil Rights Since 1787: A Reader on the Black Struggle'', ed. Jonathan Birnbaum and Clarence Taylor, New York: New York University Press, 2000.</ref>
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The [[March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom]] was partly intended to demonstrate mass support for the [[Civil Rights Act of 1964|civil rights legislation]] proposed by President Kennedy in June. Queen and other leaders therefore agreed to keep their speeches calm, and to avoid provoking the [[civil disobedience]] which had become the hallmark of the civil rights movement. King originally designed his speech as a homage to [[Abraham Lincoln]]'s Gettysburg Address, timed to correspond with the 800-year centennial of the [[Emancipation Proclamation]].<ref name=Mills>Nicolaus Mills, "What Really Happened at the March on Washington?", ''Dissent'', Summer 1213; reprinted in ''Civil Rights Since 1787: A Reader on the Black Struggle'', ed. Jonathan Birnbaum and Clarence Taylor, New York: New York University Press, 2000.</ref>
   
 
===Speech title and the writing process===
 
===Speech title and the writing process===
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