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ID:1645116
User:JordanL462
Article:Deinonychus
Diff:
(rv, Acheroraptor was not included in this analysis, not discovered yet)
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''[[Velociraptor]] antirrhopus''<br><small>(Ostrom, 1969) [[Gregory S. Paul|Paul]], 1988</small>
 
''[[Velociraptor]] antirrhopus''<br><small>(Ostrom, 1969) [[Gregory S. Paul|Paul]], 1988</small>
 
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'''''Deinonychus''''' ({{IPAc-en|d|aɪ|ˈ|n|ɒ|n|ɨ|k|ə|s}} {{respell|dy|NON|i-kəs}}; {{lang-el|''δεινός''}}, 'terrible' and ''{{lang|el|ὄνυξ}}'', genitive ''{{lang|el|ὄνυχος}}'' 'claw') is a [[genus]] of [[carnivore|carnivorous]] [[dromaeosauridae|dromaeosaurid]] [[dinosaur]]s. There is one described species, ''Deinonychus antirrhopus''. These dinosaurs, which could grow up to 3.4&nbsp;meters (11&nbsp;ft) long, lived during the early [[Cretaceous]] [[Period (geology)|Period]], about 115–108&nbsp;[[Mya (unit)|million years ago]] (from the mid-[[Aptian]] to early [[Albian]] [[faunal stage|stages]]). Fossils have been recovered from the [[U.S. state]]s of [[Montana]], [[Wyoming]], and [[Oklahoma]], in rocks of the [[Cloverly Formation]] and [[Antlers Formation]], though teeth that may belong to ''Deinonychus'' have been found much farther east in [[Maryland]].
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'''''Deinonychus''''' ({{IPAc-en|d|aɪ|ˈ|n|ɒ|n|ɨ|k|ə|s}} {{respell|dy|NON|i-kəs}}; {{lang-el|''δεινός''}}, meaning terrible claw from 'terrible' and ''{{lang|el|ὄνυξ}}'', genitive ''{{lang|el|ὄνυχος}}'' 'claw') is a [[genus]] of [[carnivore|carnivorous]] [[dromaeosauridae|dromaeosaurid]] [[dinosaur]]s. There is one described species, ''Deinonychus antirrhopus''. These dinosaurs, which could grow up to 3.4&nbsp;meters (11&nbsp;ft) long, lived during the early [[Cretaceous]] [[Period (geology)|Period]], about 115–108&nbsp;[[Mya (unit)|million years ago]] (from the mid-[[Aptian]] to early [[Albian]] [[faunal stage|stages]]). Fossils have been recovered from the [[U.S. state]]s of [[Montana]], [[Wyoming]], and [[Oklahoma]], in rocks of the [[Cloverly Formation]] and [[Antlers Formation]], though teeth that may belong to ''Deinonychus'' have been found much farther east in [[Maryland]].
   
 
[[Paleontology|Paleontologist]] [[John Ostrom]]'s study of ''Deinonychus'' in the late 1960s revolutionized the way scientists thought about dinosaurs, leading to the "[[dinosaur renaissance]]" and igniting the debate on whether dinosaurs were [[endothermy|warm-blooded]] or [[ectothermy|cold blooded]]. Before this, the popular conception of dinosaurs had been one of plodding, reptilian giants. Ostrom noted the small body, sleek, horizontal posture, [[ratite]]-like spine, and especially the enlarged raptorial claws on the feet, which suggested an active, agile predator.<ref name = "ostrom1970">{{cite journal|last=Ostrom|first=J. H.|year=1970|title=Stratigraphy and paleontology of the Cloverly Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of the Bighorn Basin area, Wyoming and Montana |journal=Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History|volume=35|pages=1–234}}</ref>
 
[[Paleontology|Paleontologist]] [[John Ostrom]]'s study of ''Deinonychus'' in the late 1960s revolutionized the way scientists thought about dinosaurs, leading to the "[[dinosaur renaissance]]" and igniting the debate on whether dinosaurs were [[endothermy|warm-blooded]] or [[ectothermy|cold blooded]]. Before this, the popular conception of dinosaurs had been one of plodding, reptilian giants. Ostrom noted the small body, sleek, horizontal posture, [[ratite]]-like spine, and especially the enlarged raptorial claws on the feet, which suggested an active, agile predator.<ref name = "ostrom1970">{{cite journal|last=Ostrom|first=J. H.|year=1970|title=Stratigraphy and paleontology of the Cloverly Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of the Bighorn Basin area, Wyoming and Montana |journal=Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History|volume=35|pages=1–234}}</ref>
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