ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Report

Navigation

ID:1764212
User:203.46.11.236
Article:Creep (deformation)
Diff:
(Creep of concrete: main article has been moved, so changing link)
(Applications: grammar and added gas turbine ref to jet engines)
Line 90: Line 90:
 
An example of an application involving creep deformation is the design of tungsten light bulb filaments. Sagging of the filament coil between its supports increases with time due to creep deformation caused by the weight of the filament itself. If too much deformation occurs, the adjacent turns of the coil touch one another, causing an electrical short and local overheating, which quickly leads to failure of the filament. The coil geometry and supports are therefore designed to limit the stresses caused by the weight of the filament, and a special tungsten alloy with small amounts of [[oxygen]] trapped in the [[crystallite]] [[grain boundaries]] is used to slow the rate of [[Coble creep]].
 
An example of an application involving creep deformation is the design of tungsten light bulb filaments. Sagging of the filament coil between its supports increases with time due to creep deformation caused by the weight of the filament itself. If too much deformation occurs, the adjacent turns of the coil touch one another, causing an electrical short and local overheating, which quickly leads to failure of the filament. The coil geometry and supports are therefore designed to limit the stresses caused by the weight of the filament, and a special tungsten alloy with small amounts of [[oxygen]] trapped in the [[crystallite]] [[grain boundaries]] is used to slow the rate of [[Coble creep]].
   
In steam turbine power plants, pipes carry steam at high temperatures (566°C or 1050°F) and pressures (above 24.1 MPa or 3500 psi). In jet engines, temperatures can reach up to 1400°C (2550°F) and initiate creep deformation in even advanced coated turbine blades. Hence, it is crucial for correct functionality to understand the creep deformation behavior of materials.
+
In steam turbine power plants, pipes carry steam at high temperatures (566°C or 1050°F) and pressures (above 24.1 MPa or 3500 psi). In jet engines (gas turbines), temperatures can reach up to 1400°C (2550°F) and initiate creep deformation even in advanced coated turbine blades. Hence, it is crucial for correct functionality to understand the creep deformation behavior of materials.
   
 
Creep deformation is important not only in systems where high temperatures are endured such as [[nuclear power plant]]s, [[jet engine]]s and [[heat exchanger]]s, but also in the design of many everyday objects. For example, metal paper clips are stronger than plastic ones because plastics creep at room temperatures. Aging [[glass]] windows are often erroneously used as an example of this phenomenon: measurable creep would only occur at temperatures above the [[glass transition temperature]] around 500°C (900°F). While glass does exhibit creep under the right conditions, apparent sagging in old windows may instead be a consequence of obsolete manufacturing processes, such as that used to create [[Crown glass (window)|crown glass]], which resulted in inconsistent thickness.<ref>{{Cite book|isbn = 0-8493-9658-1|page = 476|last = Lakes|first = Roderic S.|title = Viscoelastic Solids|year = 1999}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title = Is glass liquid or solid?|accessdate = 2008-10-15|url = http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/Glass/glass.html}}</ref>
 
Creep deformation is important not only in systems where high temperatures are endured such as [[nuclear power plant]]s, [[jet engine]]s and [[heat exchanger]]s, but also in the design of many everyday objects. For example, metal paper clips are stronger than plastic ones because plastics creep at room temperatures. Aging [[glass]] windows are often erroneously used as an example of this phenomenon: measurable creep would only occur at temperatures above the [[glass transition temperature]] around 500°C (900°F). While glass does exhibit creep under the right conditions, apparent sagging in old windows may instead be a consequence of obsolete manufacturing processes, such as that used to create [[Crown glass (window)|crown glass]], which resulted in inconsistent thickness.<ref>{{Cite book|isbn = 0-8493-9658-1|page = 476|last = Lakes|first = Roderic S.|title = Viscoelastic Solids|year = 1999}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title = Is glass liquid or solid?|accessdate = 2008-10-15|url = http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/Glass/glass.html}}</ref>
Reason:ANN scored at 0.890242
Your username:
Reverted:Yes
Comment
(optional):

Note: Comments are completely optional. You do not have to justify your edit.
If this is a false positive, then you're right, and the bot is wrong - you don't need to explain why.