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Article:Northern Canada
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(Reverted to revision 463085500 by ZéroBot: partly redundant and partly wrong. (TW))
(Territoriality)
(Tag: references removed)
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These reckonings somewhat depend on the concept of [[nordicity]], a measure of northernness that other Arctic territories share. Canada, a country in [[Northern America|northern North America]] whose population is concentrated along its [[Canada – United States border|southern frontier]] with the [[United States]], is frequently reckoned to not have a 'south.' As such, the 'South' is only perceived as [[List of regions of Canada|a region]] when it is contrasted to or viewed from those in the North.
 
These reckonings somewhat depend on the concept of [[nordicity]], a measure of northernness that other Arctic territories share. Canada, a country in [[Northern America|northern North America]] whose population is concentrated along its [[Canada – United States border|southern frontier]] with the [[United States]], is frequently reckoned to not have a 'south.' As such, the 'South' is only perceived as [[List of regions of Canada|a region]] when it is contrasted to or viewed from those in the North.
   
==Territoriality==
 
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[[File:Arctic.svg|thumb|300px|Northern Canada (depicted to the left) on a map of the Arctic Circle.]]
 
Since 1925, Canada has claimed the portion of the Arctic between 60°W and 141°W<ref>[http://atlas.gc.ca/site/english/maps/historical/territorialevolution/1927/1 The Atlas of Canada - Territorial Evolution, 1927]</ref> [[longitude]], extending all the way north to the [[North Pole]]: all islands in the [[Canadian Arctic Archipelago]] and [[Herschel Island|Herschel]], off the Yukon coast, form part of the region, are Canadian territory and the [[territorial waters]] claimed by Canada surround these islands. Views of territorial claims in this region are complicated by disagreements on legal principles. Canada and the [[Union of Soviet Socialist Republics|USSR]]/[[Russia]] have long claimed that their territory extends according to the sector principle to the [[North Pole]]. The [[United States]] does not accept the sector principle and does not make a sector claim based on its [[Alaska]]n Arctic coast. Claims that undersea geographic features are extensions of a country's [[continental shelf]] are also used to support claims; for example the [[Denmark]]/[[Greenland]] claim on territory to the North Pole, some of which is disputed by Canada. Foreign ships, both civilian and military are allowed the right of [[innocent passage]] through the territorial waters of a [[Littoral zone|littoral]] state subject to conditions in the [[United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea]].<ref>[http://www.globelaw.com/LawSea/ls82_1.htm United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea]</ref> The right of innocent passage is not allowed however, in [[internal waters]], which are enclosed bodies of water or waters landward of a chain of islands. Disagreements about the sector principle or extension of territory to the North Pole and to the definition of internal waters in the Arctic lie behind differences on [[territorial claims in the Arctic]]. This claim is recognized by most countries with some exceptions, including the United States; Denmark, Russia, and [[Norway]] have made claims similar to those of Canada in the Arctic and are opposed by the [[European Union]] and the U.S.
 
 
This is especially important with the [[Northwest Passage]]. Canada asserts control of this passage as part of the [[Canadian Internal Waters]] because it is within {{convert|20|km|abbr=on}} of Canadian islands; the U.S. claims that it is in [[international waters]]. Today ice and freezing temperatures makes this a minor issue, but [[climate change]] may make the passage more accessible to shipping, something that concerns the Canadian government and inhabitants of the environmentally sensitive region.
 
 
Similarly, the disputed [[Hans Island]] (with Denmark), in the [[Nares Strait]] which is west of Greenland, may be a flashpoint for challenges to overall Canadian sovereignty in the North.
 
   
 
==Topography (Geography)==
 
==Topography (Geography)==
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