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User:206.110.196.226
Article:Guadalcanal
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(The Second World War)
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In the months following the [[attack on Pearl Harbor]] in December 1941, the Japanese drove the Americans out of the [[Philippines]], the [[United Kingdom|British]] out of [[British Malaya]], and the [[Netherlands|Dutch]] out of the [[East Indies]]. The Japanese then began to expand into the [[Western Pacific Ocean|Western Pacific]], occupying many islands in an attempt to build a defensive ring around their conquests and threaten the lines of communication from the [[United States]] to [[Australia]] and [[New Zealand]]. The Japanese reached Guadalcanal in May 1942.
 
In the months following the [[attack on Pearl Harbor]] in December 1941, the Japanese drove the Americans out of the [[Philippines]], the [[United Kingdom|British]] out of [[British Malaya]], and the [[Netherlands|Dutch]] out of the [[East Indies]]. The Japanese then began to expand into the [[Western Pacific Ocean|Western Pacific]], occupying many islands in an attempt to build a defensive ring around their conquests and threaten the lines of communication from the [[United States]] to [[Australia]] and [[New Zealand]]. The Japanese reached Guadalcanal in May 1942.
   
When an allied reconnaissance mission spotted construction of a Japanese airfield at [[Lunga Point]] on the north coast of Guadalcanal, the situation became critical.<ref>[[Edwin P. Hoyt]], ''Japan's War'', p 305-6 ISBN 0-07-030612-5</ref> This new Japanese airfield represented a threat to Australia itself, and so the United States as a matter of urgency, despite not being adequately prepared, conducted the first amphibious landing of the war. The initial landings of [[United States Marine Corps|US Marines]] on August 7, 1942 secured the airfield without too much difficulty, but holding the airfield for the next six months was one of the most hotly contested campaigns in the entire war for the control of ground, sea and skies. Guadalcanal became a major turning point in the war as it stopped Japanese expansion. After six months of fighting the Japanese ceased contesting the control of the island. They finally evacuated the island at [[Cape Esperance]] on the north west coast in February 1943.<ref>Naval History and Heritage "Guadalcanal Campaign, August 1942 - February 1943". Retrieved from http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-pac/guadlcnl/guadlcnl.htm.</ref>
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When an allied reconnaissance mission spotted licking ass holes construction of a Japanese airfield at [[Lunga Point]] on the north coast of Guadalcanal, the situation became critical.<ref>[[Edwin P. Hoyt]], ''Japan's War'', p 305-6 ISBN 0-07-030612-5</ref> This new Japanese airfield represented a threat to Australia itself, and so the United States as a matter of urgency, despite not being adequately prepared, conducted the first amphibious landing of the war. The initial landings of [[United States Marine Corps|US Marines]] on August 7, 1942 secured the airfield without too much difficulty, but holding the airfield for the next six months was one of the most hotly contested campaigns in the entire war for the control of ground, sea and skies. Guadalcanal became a major turning point in the war as it stopped Japanese expansion. After six months of fighting the Japanese ceased contesting the control of the island. They finally evacuated the island at [[Cape Esperance]] on the north west coast in February 1943.<ref>Naval History and Heritage "Guadalcanal Campaign, August 1942 - February 1943". Retrieved from http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/events/wwii-pac/guadlcnl/guadlcnl.htm.</ref>
   
 
Immediately after landing on the island, the allies began finishing the airfield begun by the Japanese. It was then named [[Henderson Field (Guadalcanal)|Henderson Field]] after a Marine aviator killed in combat during the [[Battle of Midway]]. Aircraft operating from Henderson Field during the campaign were a hodgepodge of Marine, Army, Navy and allied aircraft that became known as the [[Cactus Air Force]]. They defended the airfield and threatened any Japanese ships that ventured into the vicinity during daylight hours. However, at night, Japanese naval forces were able to shell the airfield and deliver troops with supplies, retiring before daylight. The Japanese used fast ships to make these runs, and this became known as the [[Tokyo Express]]. So many ships from both sides were sunk in the many engagements in and around the Solomon Island chain that the nearby waters were referred to as [[Ironbottom Sound]].
 
Immediately after landing on the island, the allies began finishing the airfield begun by the Japanese. It was then named [[Henderson Field (Guadalcanal)|Henderson Field]] after a Marine aviator killed in combat during the [[Battle of Midway]]. Aircraft operating from Henderson Field during the campaign were a hodgepodge of Marine, Army, Navy and allied aircraft that became known as the [[Cactus Air Force]]. They defended the airfield and threatened any Japanese ships that ventured into the vicinity during daylight hours. However, at night, Japanese naval forces were able to shell the airfield and deliver troops with supplies, retiring before daylight. The Japanese used fast ships to make these runs, and this became known as the [[Tokyo Express]]. So many ships from both sides were sunk in the many engagements in and around the Solomon Island chain that the nearby waters were referred to as [[Ironbottom Sound]].
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