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ID: 1106579
User: 66.54.75.242
Article: Berkeley Software Distribution
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The official 4.2BSD release came in August 1983. It was notable as the first version released after the 1982 departure of Bill Joy to co-found [[Sun Microsystems]]; [[Mike Karels]] and [[Marshall Kirk McKusick]] took on leadership roles within the project from that point forward. On a lighter note, it also marked the debut of [[BSD Daemon|BSD's daemon mascot]] in a drawing by [[John Lasseter]] that appeared on the cover of the printed manuals distributed by [[USENIX]].
 
The official 4.2BSD release came in August 1983. It was notable as the first version released after the 1982 departure of Bill Joy to co-found [[Sun Microsystems]]; [[Mike Karels]] and [[Marshall Kirk McKusick]] took on leadership roles within the project from that point forward. On a lighter note, it also marked the debut of [[BSD Daemon|BSD's daemon mascot]] in a drawing by [[John Lasseter]] that appeared on the cover of the printed manuals distributed by [[USENIX]].
   
 
===4.3BSD=== '''4.3BSD''' was released in June 1986. Its main changes were to improve the performance of many of the new contributions of 4.2BSD that had not been as heavily tuned as the 4.1BSD code. Prior to the release, BSD's implementation of TCP/IP had diverged considerably from BBN's official implementation. After several months of testing, DARPA determined that the 4.2BSD version was superior and would remain in 4.3BSD. (See also [[History of the Internet]].) After 4.3BSD, it was determined that BSD would move away from the aging VAX platform. The [[Computer Consoles Inc.#Power 5 and Power 6 computers|Power 6/32]] platform (codenamed "Tahoe") developed by [[Computer Consoles Inc.]] seemed promising at the time, but was abandoned by its developers shortly thereafter. Nonetheless, the '''4.3BSD-Tahoe''' port (June 1988) proved valuable, as it led to a separation of machine-dependent and machine-independent code in BSD which would improve the system's future portability. Apart from por
===4.3BSD===
 
'''4.3BSD''' was released in June 1986. Its main changes were to improve the performance of many of the new contributions of 4.2BSD that had not been as heavily tuned as the 4.1BSD code. Prior to the release, BSD's implementation of TCP/IP had diverged considerably from BBN's official implementation. After several months of testing, DARPA determined that the 4.2BSD version was superior and would remain in 4.3BSD. (See also [[History of the Internet]].)
 
 
After 4.3BSD, it was determined that BSD would move away from the aging VAX platform. The [[Computer Consoles Inc.#Power 5 and Power 6 computers|Power 6/32]] platform (codenamed "Tahoe") developed by [[Computer Consoles Inc.]] seemed promising at the time, but was abandoned by its developers shortly thereafter. Nonetheless, the '''4.3BSD-Tahoe''' port (June 1988) proved valuable, as it led to a separation of machine-dependent and machine-independent code in BSD which would improve the system's future portability.
 
 
Apart from portability, the CSRG worked on an implementation of the [[Open Systems Interconnect|OSI]] network protocol stack, improvements to the kernel virtual memory system and (with [[Van Jacobson]] of [[Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory|LBL]]) new TCP/IP algorithms to accommodate the growth of the internet.<ref name="beyond43">M.K. McKusick, M.J. Karels, Keith Sklower, Kevin Fall, Marc Teitelbaum and Keith Bostic (1989). Current Research by The Computer Systems Research Group of Berkeley. Proc. European Unix Users Group.</ref>
 
 
Until then, all versions of BSD incorporated proprietary AT&T Unix code and were, therefore, subject to an AT&T software license. Source code licenses had become very expensive and several outside parties had expressed interest in a separate release of the networking code, which had been developed entirely outside AT&T and would not be subject to the licensing requirement. This led to '''Networking Release 1''' ('''Net/1'''), which was made available to non-licensees of AT&T code and was [[free software|freely redistributable]] under the terms of the [[BSD license]]. It was released in June 1989.
 
 
'''4.3BSD-Reno''' came in early 1990. It was an interim release during the early development of 4.4BSD, and its use was considered a "gamble", hence the naming after the [[gambling]] center of [[Reno, Nevada]]. This release was explicitly moving towards [[POSIX]] compliance,<ref name="beyond43"/> and, according to some, away from the BSD philosophy (as POSIX is very much based on System V, and Reno was quite bloated compared to previous releases). Among the new features was an [[Network File System|NFS]] implementation from the [[University of Guelph]].
 
 
In August 2006, ''Information Week'' magazine rated 4.3BSD as the "Greatest Software Ever Written".<ref name="iw">{{cite web|url=http://www.informationweek.com/shared/printableArticle.jhtml?articleID=191901844|title=What's The Greatest Software Ever Written?|last=Babcock|first=Charles|date=2006-08-14|work=[[InformationWeek]]|accessdate=2009-01-20}}</ref> They commented: "BSD 4.3 represents the single biggest theoretical undergirder of the Internet."
 
   
 
===Net/2 and legal troubles===
 
===Net/2 and legal troubles===
Reason: ANN scored at 0.955924
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:33:23 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:33:23 PM #101723
Bradley (anonymous)

HPcxgu http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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