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Article: Amador Valley High School
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| enrollment = 2,591 (as of 2010–2011)<ref name="NCES">{{Citation|url=http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/schoolsearch/school_detail.asp?Search=1&DistrictID=0600020&ID=060002009282|title=Amador Valley High School|publisher=National Center for Education Statistics|accessdate=2012-05-11}}</ref>
 
| enrollment = 2,591 (as of 2010–2011)<ref name="NCES">{{Citation|url=http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/schoolsearch/school_detail.asp?Search=1&DistrictID=0600020&ID=060002009282|title=Amador Valley High School|publisher=National Center for Education Statistics|accessdate=2012-05-11}}</ref>
 
| faculty = 108.63 (on [[full-time equivalent]] (FTE) basis)<ref name="NCES" />
 
| faculty = 108.63 (on [[full-time equivalent]] (FTE) basis)<ref name="NCES" />
| ceeb = 052495
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| ceeb = 052495 MIREN YO NO HABLO INGLES
 
| campus type = Suburban
 
| campus type = Suburban
 
| campus size = {{convert|39.27|acre|ha}}<ref name="2007 sarc"/>
 
| campus size = {{convert|39.27|acre|ha}}<ref name="2007 sarc"/>
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| newspaper = ''The Amadon''
 
| newspaper = ''The Amadon''
 
| colors = {{Colorbox|purple}}{{Colorbox|gold}} Purple and gold
 
| colors = {{Colorbox|purple}}{{Colorbox|gold}} Purple and gold
| location = 1155 Santa Rita Road <br />[[Pleasanton, California|Pleasanton]], [[California|CA]] 94566
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| location = 1155 Santa Rita Road <br />[[Pleasanton,
| country = USA
 
| coordinates = {{Coord|37.6689|-121.8743|display=inline,title}}
 
| website = [http://pleasanton.k12.ca.us/amador/ School web site]
 
| feeders = [[Harvest Park Middle School]], [[Pleasanton Middle School]], [[Hart Middle School]]
 
}}
 
 
'''Amador Valley High School''' is a public high school in [[Pleasanton, California|Pleasanton]], [[California]], a city east of [[San Francisco, California|San Francisco]]. Amador Valley is one of four high schools in the Pleasanton Unified School District, which includes [[Foothill High School (Pleasanton, California)|Foothill High School]], [[Village High School]], and [[Horizon High School (Pleasanton, California)|Horizon High School]]. The school was founded as Amador Valley Joint Union High School, from which its first class graduated in 1923. The school has been named a [[California Distinguished School]], a [[Character Education Partnership|National School of Character]], and a [[National Blue Ribbon School]].
 
 
As of 2009, Amador Valley offers its 2,500&nbsp;students 23&nbsp;[[varsity team|varsity sports]], 20&nbsp;[[Advanced Placement]] courses, a program to study local aquatic wildlife, and vocational training. A monthly school publication, the ''Amadon'', reports on athletics, academic and extracurricular issues, and news of the school and community. Amador's location allows it to be the launching point for parades and to host the site of the Amador Theater, Pleasanton's central performing arts facility for more than 60 years. The Amador Theater has remained a part of the Amador Valley campus since the 1930s, despite major school construction in 1968, 1997, and 2004.
 
   
 
Student groups, including the Marching Band and Math Team, have toured out-of-state after achieving high rankings in Californian competitions. In national competitions such as [[We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution]], the Amador Valley team has ranked in the top four places from 2006 to 2009. Similarly, the Amador Valley Robotics Team is recognized nationally as the only high school team in the [[autonomous underwater vehicle]] (AUV) competition hosted by [[Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI)|Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International]] (AUVSI).
 
Student groups, including the Marching Band and Math Team, have toured out-of-state after achieving high rankings in Californian competitions. In national competitions such as [[We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution]], the Amador Valley team has ranked in the top four places from 2006 to 2009. Similarly, the Amador Valley Robotics Team is recognized nationally as the only high school team in the [[autonomous underwater vehicle]] (AUV) competition hosted by [[Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI)|Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International]] (AUVSI).
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In 1988, voters approved the unification of several school districts in the region. On July 1, 1988, the AVJUHSD merged with the Pleasanton Joint School District to form the Pleasanton Unified School District.<ref name="long p2"/><ref name="pw 2005b"/> As of 2009, the district contains two comprehensive high schools (Amador Valley and Foothill), two [[continuation high school]]s (Horizon and Village), three middle schools, seven elementary schools, and an adult education program.<ref>{{Citation|url=http://www.ppie.org/about.html |title=PPIE - Pleasanton Partnerships in Education Foundation |publisher=Pleasanton Partnerships in Education Foundation |date= |accessdate=2009-07-27}} {{Dead link|date=March 2012|bot=H3llBot}}</ref>
 
In 1988, voters approved the unification of several school districts in the region. On July 1, 1988, the AVJUHSD merged with the Pleasanton Joint School District to form the Pleasanton Unified School District.<ref name="long p2"/><ref name="pw 2005b"/> As of 2009, the district contains two comprehensive high schools (Amador Valley and Foothill), two [[continuation high school]]s (Horizon and Village), three middle schools, seven elementary schools, and an adult education program.<ref>{{Citation|url=http://www.ppie.org/about.html |title=PPIE - Pleasanton Partnerships in Education Foundation |publisher=Pleasanton Partnerships in Education Foundation |date= |accessdate=2009-07-27}} {{Dead link|date=March 2012|bot=H3llBot}}</ref>
   
The school grounds are bordered on the east and southeast by Santa Rita Road, the [[Altamont Commuter Express]] rail line, and [[Arroyo del Valle]].<ref name="wainwright p92"/> To the north are several businesses and residential districts lie on the western border. Because of the school's proximity to Main Street and downtown, Amador Valley High School is the launch point for the annual Pleasanton Hometown Holidays Celebration Parade and the annual Fall Festival Parade, a part of the [[Alameda County Fairgrounds|Alameda County Fair]] since the 1940s. The Fall Festival parade, which features bands, floats, balloons, horses, and antique cars, starts on the Amador Valley parking lot, travels down Main Street, and ends near the fairgrounds.<ref name="vt 2007"/><ref>{{Citation |title=Parade Participant Dropoff Instructions |url=http://www.ci.pleasanton.ca.us/pdf/2011-ParadeParticipantDropOffInstructions.pdf|publisher=The City of Pleasanton |accessdate=2009-06-30|format=PDF}}</ref>
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The school grounds are bordered on the east and southeast by Santa Rita Road, the [[Altamont Commuter Express]] rail line, and [[Arroyo del Valle]].<ref name="wainwright p92"/> To the north are several businesses and residential districts lie on the western border. Becauh point for the annual Pleasanton Hometown Holidays Celebration Parade and the annual Fall Festival Parade, a part of the [[Alameda County Fairgrounds|Alameda County Fair]] since the 1940s. The Fall Festival parade, which features bands, floats, balloons, horses, and antique cars, starts on the Amador Valley parking lot, travels down Main Street, and ends near the fairgrounds.<ref name="vt 2007"/><ref>{{Citation |title=Parade Participant Dropoff Instructions |url=http://www.ci.pleasatructions.pdf|publisher=The City of Pleasanton |accessdate=2009-06-30|format=PDF}}</ref>
   
 
===Court battle===
 
===Court battle===
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In 1978, the AVJUHSD challenged the constitutionality of [[California Proposition 13 (1978)|California Proposition&nbsp;13]], which placed a cap on county real estate taxes. The proposition limited property tax assessments to the 1975 standard, eliminating $7 billion of the $11.4 billion in property tax revenue collected each year. According to the ''[[Washington Post]]'', the "severe" limitations this imposed on state funding forced local governments and most school districts in California to make "drastic cutbacks".<ref name="budget cutbacks"/> Furthermore, an article in the ''[[Los Angeles Times]]'' noted that Federal aid money for Californian schools, worth about $98 million each year, may be reduced if state-funded programs are cut. A recent Congressional report had found that Proposition 13 would not result in any major "local spending" cuts. In order to receive Federal aid, the state needed to maintain present levels of spending on local programs or secure local [[matching funds]]. However, the enforcement of this spending was "flexible in many programs" and the [[Federal Impact Aid]] program for schools was therefore in jeopardy.<ref name="federal aid reduced"/>
 
In 1978, the AVJUHSD challenged the constitutionality of [[California Proposition 13 (1978)|California Proposition&nbsp;13]], which placed a cap on county real estate taxes. The proposition limited property tax assessments to the 1975 standard, eliminating $7 billion of the $11.4 billion in property tax revenue collected each year. According to the ''[[Washington Post]]'', the "severe" limitations this imposed on state funding forced local governments and most school districts in California to make "drastic cutbacks".<ref name="budget cutbacks"/> Furthermore, an article in the ''[[Los Angeles Times]]'' noted that Federal aid money for Californian schools, worth about $98 million each year, may be reduced if state-funded programs are cut. A recent Congressional report had found that Proposition 13 would not result in any major "local spending" cuts. In order to receive Federal aid, the state needed to maintain present levels of spending on local programs or secure local [[matching funds]]. However, the enforcement of this spending was "flexible in many programs" and the [[Federal Impact Aid]] program for schools was therefore in jeopardy.<ref name="federal aid reduced"/>
   
The district held that the measure was "so drastic and far-reaching that it was 'a revision' of the state Constitution and not a mere amendment". Ultimately, the district was unsuccessful in its suit. In their ruling, the judges distinguished between "[[Constitutional amendment|amendment]]" and "[[Constitutional revision|revision]]." The court confirmed that an initiative cannot "revise" the constitution; Proposition&nbsp;13, however, was an amendment to the [[California Constitution]] and not a "revision".<ref name="court ruling"/> In 2009, ''Amador Valley'' was cited by dissenting Justice [[Carlos R. Moreno]] in arguing the non-constitutionality of [[California Proposition 8 (2008)|California Proposition&nbsp;8]].<ref>{{Citation|url=http://www.cwlc.org/files/docs/S168047_Prop8-Opinion_5-26-09.pdf|title=In the Supreme Court of California|date=2009-05-26|publisher=California Women's Law Center|page=152|accessdate=20 November 2009}}</ref>
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The district held that the measure was "so drastic and far-reaching that it was 'a revision' of the state Constitution and not a mere amendment". Ultimately, the district was unsuccessful in its suit. In their ruling, the judges distinguished between "[[Constitutional amendment|amendment]]" and "[[Constitutional revision|revision]]." The court confirmed that an initiative cannot "revise" the constitution; Proposition&nbsp;13, however, was an amendment to the [[California Constitution]] and not a "revision".<ref name=lity of [[California Proposition 8 (2008)|California Proposition&nbsp;8]].<ref>{{Citation|url=http://www.cwlc.org/files/docs/S168047_Prop8-Opinion_5-26-09.pdf|title=In the Supreme Court of California|date=2009-05-26|publisher=California Women's Law Center|page=152|accessdate=20 November 2009}}</ref>
   
 
===Development===
 
===Development===
   
[[File:Amador Valley and Pleasanton Ridge.jpg|right|thumb|alt=Beige building with red roof. Grassy field in front and tree-covered hill in the back. A group of students sits on a bench facing the building.|School campus with the [[Pleasanton Ridge]] in the background]]
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[[File:Amador Valley and Pleasanton Ridge.jpg|right|thumb|alt=Beige building with red roof. Grassy field in f
 
The first class of eight students graduated in 1923, and the school quickly became known for its municipal bands and sports teams.<ref name="wainwright p93"/> The school selected the [[Don (honorific)|Don]] as its mascot, in honor of the title used by Amador;<ref name="wainwright p77"/> ''Don'' is a Spanish term used as a mark of high esteem for a distinguished nobleman or gentleman.
 
 
Parents of Amador Valley students became involved with student activities. In 1927, Pleasanton mothers decided to start a school lunch program to provide students with a better environment for learning. Parents donated pots and pans, and a newly hired cook prepared lunches, to be eaten at new tables and benches. The tables and benches were constructed by the custodian and the music teacher from wood of horse stalls formerly on the campus. This project led to the formation of a [[Parent-Teacher Association]] (PTA) chapter at Amador Valley in the late 1920s.<ref name="long p66"/>
 
 
 
Much of the original Amador Valley High School building was reconstructed in 1968. The following year, the school reached its maximum capacity, about 1,895&nbsp;students. To accommodate the larger student population, [[Dublin High School (Dublin, California)|Dublin High School]] was founded. Both schools held classes on the Amador Valley campus during the 1968–69 school year.<ref name="long p96"/> A continued influx of families to the Pleasanton region prompted the foundation of another high school, [[Foothill High School (Pleasanton, California)|Foothill]], in 1973.<ref name="wainwright p124"/>
 
Much of the original Amador Valley High School building was reconstructed in 1968. The following year, the school reached its maximum capacity, about 1,895&nbsp;students. To accommodate the larger student population, [[Dublin High School (Dublin, California)|Dublin High School]] was founded. Both schools held classes on the Amador Valley campus during the 1968–69 school year.<ref name="long p96"/> A continued influx of families to the Pleasanton region prompted the foundation of another high school, [[Foothill High School (Pleasanton, California)|Foothill]], in 1973.<ref name="wainwright p124"/>
   
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| url = http://www.pleasantonweekly.com/story.php?story_id=5152
 
| url = http://www.pleasantonweekly.com/story.php?story_id=5152
 
| accessdate = 2009-10-06
 
| accessdate = 2009-10-06
  +
| re
| ref = CITEREFUnattributed2009a}}
 
*{{Citation
 
 
| author = Wainwright, Mary-Jo; Museum on Main
 
| author = Wainwright, Mary-Jo; Museum on Main
 
| title = Pleasanton
 
| title = Pleasanton
Reason: ANN scored at 0.963706
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:11:44 PM
Status: Reported
Sunday, the 4th of January 2015 at 06:06:11 PM #97479
sammy (anonymous)

MBa96l http://www.QS3PE5ZGdxC9IoVKTAPT2DBYpPkMKqfz.com

Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:11:44 PM #101690
Bradley (anonymous)

bR5ENE http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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