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ID: 1213390
User: 50.200.52.118
Article: American Jews
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JOSH BECK
===Assimilation and population changes===
 
These parallel themes have facilitated the extraordinary economic, political, and social success of the American Jewish community, but also have contributed to widespread [[cultural assimilation]].<ref>{{cite journal |last=Postrel|first=Virginia|title=Uncommon Culture |publisher=Reason Magazine|month=May | year=1993| url=http://www.reason.com/news/show/29368.html |accessdate=October 5, 2007| archiveurl= http://web.archive.org/web/20071010033730/http://reason.com/news/show/29368.html| archivedate= October 10, 2007 <!--DASHBot-->| deadurl= no}}</ref> More recently however, the propriety and degree of [[Jewish assimilation|assimilation]] has also become a significant and controversial issue within the modern American Jewish community, with both [[Zionism|political]] and religious skeptics.<ref>Bela Vago, Marsha L. Rozenblit, {{PDFlink|[http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/4467195.pdf "Review of Jewish Assimilation in Modern Times"]}}, ''Jewish Social Studies'', Vol. 44, No. 3/4 (Summer–Autumn, 1982), pp. 334–335.<blockquote>Religious Jews regarded those who assimilated with horror, and Zionists campaigned against assimilation as an act of treason.</blockquote></ref>
 
 
While not all Jews disapprove of [[Interreligious marriage|intermarriage]], many members of the Jewish community have become concerned that the high rate of interfaith marriage will result in the eventual disappearance of the American Jewish community. Intermarriage rates have risen from roughly 6% in 1950 to approximately 40–50% in the year 2000.<ref>[http://college.hmco.com/history/readerscomp/rcah/html/ah_047702_religiouscul.htm College.hmco.com]</ref><ref name="populationdrop1">[http://www.jewishla.org/news/html/populationdrop.html Jewishla.org]</ref> This, in combination with the comparatively low birthrate in the Jewish community, has led to a 5% decline in the Jewish population of the United States in the 1990s.<ref name="populationdrop1"/> In addition to this, when compared with the general American population, the American Jewish community is slightly older.<ref name="populationdrop1"/>
 
 
Despite the fact that only 33% of intermarried couples provide their children with a Jewish upbringing, doing so is more common among intermarried families raising their children in areas with high Jewish populations.<ref name=jewglobe>{{cite news|url=http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2006/11/10/jewish_population_in_region_rises/|work=Boston Globe|title=Jewish population in region rises|accessdate=November 29, 2009|author=Michael Paulson | date=November 10, 2006}}</ref> The Boston area, for example, is exceptional in that an estimated 60% percent of children of intermarriages are being raised Jewish, meaning that intermarriage would actually be contributing to a net ''increase'' in the number of Jews.<ref>[http://cjp.org/getfile.asp?id=16072 CJP.org]</ref> As well, some children raised through intermarriage [[Baal teshuva movement|rediscover and embrace their Jewish roots]] when they themselves marry and have children.
 
 
In contrast to the ongoing trends of assimilation, some communities within American Jewry, such as [[Orthodox Judaism|Orthodox Jews]], have significantly higher birth rates and lower intermarriage rates, and are growing rapidly. The proportion of Jewish synagogue members who were Orthodox rose from 11% in 1971 to 21% in 2000, while the overall Jewish community declined in number.&nbsp;<ref>[http://www.nysun.com/article/8189 The Future of Judaism – January 25, 2005 – The New York Sun<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref> In 2000, there were 360,000 so-called "ultra-orthodox" ([[Haredi]]) Jews in USA (7.2%).<ref name="manchester">[http://www.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/news/archive/list/item/?id=2932&year=2007&month=07 'Majority of Jews will be Ultra-Orthodox by 2050' (The University of Manchester)<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref> The figure for 2006 is estimated at 468,000 (9.4%).<ref name="manchester"/>
 
 
About half of the American Jews are considered to be religious. Out of this 2,831,000 religious Jewish population, 92% are non-Hispanic white, 5% Hispanic (of any race) (Most commonly from Argentina, Venezuela, or Cuba; many are Hispanics who converted after finding out they are descendants of Jews forced to convert to Roman Catholicism during the Spanish Inquisition. See [[Hispanic#Religious diversity]]), 1% Asian (Mostly Bukharian and Persian Jews), 1% Black and 1% Other (Mixed Race.etc.). Almost this many non-religious Jews exist in United States, the proportion of Whites being higher than that among the religious population.<ref>{{PDFlink|[http://www.gc.cuny.edu/faculty/research_briefs/aris.pdf ARIS 2001]|449&nbsp;KB}}</ref>
 
   
 
===American Jews and race===
 
===American Jews and race===
Reason: ANN scored at 0.906883
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Friday, the 23rd of October 2015 at 10:32:36 PM
Status: Reported
Tuesday, the 11th of December 2012 at 08:23:39 AM #89884
Anonymous (anonymous)

wtf dawg mah edit was lyk str8 thug

Friday, the 23rd of October 2015 at 10:32:36 PM #101961
Bradley (anonymous)

Ta9CUq http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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