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ID: 1283224
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Article: Qin Shi Huang
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'''Qin Shi Huang''' ([[Wade-Giles]]: '''Chin Shih Huang'''; [[Standard Chinese|Chinese]]: {{linktext|秦|始|皇}}; 259 BC – 210 BC;<ref>{{cite news |url=http://www.travelchinaguide.com/attraction/shaanxi/xian/terra_cotta_army/qin_shihuang_1.htm |title=Emperor Qin Shi Huang -- First Emperor of China |publisher=TravelChinaGuide.com |accessdate=2007-09-10 }}</ref><ref name="Wood1">Wood, Frances. (2008). ''China's First Emperor and His Terracotta Warriors''. Macmillan publishing. ISBN 0-312-38112-3, ISBN 978-0-312-38112-7. p 2.</ref> personal name: '''Zhao Zheng''' (Wade-Giles: '''Chao Cheng'''; {{zh|c=趙政}});<ref>At the time, female members used ancestral name and male members used clan name. 光明日报。趙正書。北大西汉竹书:发现已亡佚李斯《苍颉篇》,书中称秦始皇和秦二世为“秦王赵正(政)”、“秦王胡亥”</ref> name in classical Chinese: (趙正) was the king of the Chinese [[Qin (state)|State of Qin]] from 246 BC to 221 BC, during the [[Warring States Period]].<ref name="duik">Duiker, William J. Spielvogel, Jackson J. Edition: 5, illustrated. (2006). ''World History: Volume I: To 1800''. Thomson Higher Education publishing. ISBN 0-495-05053-9, ISBN 978-0-495-05053-7. pg 78.</ref> He became the first [[Emperor of China|emperor]] of a unified China in 221 BC.<ref name="duik" /> He ruled until his death in 210 BC at the age of 49.<ref name="Ren">Ren, Changhong. Wu, Jingyu. (2000). ''Rise and Fall of the Qin Dynasty''. Asiapac Books Pte Ltd. ISBN 981-229-172-5, ISBN 978-981-229-172-1.</ref>
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Qin Shi Huang was not an Asian and he went to jail.'''Qin Shi Huang''' ([[Wade-Giles]]: '''Chin Shih Huang'''; [[Standard Chinese|Chinese]]: {{linktext|秦|始|皇}}; 259 BC – 210 BC;<ref>{{cite news |url=http://www.travelchinaguide.com/attraction/shaanxi/xian/terra_cotta_army/qin_shihuang_1.htm |title=Emperor Qin Shi Huang -- First Emperor of China |publisher=TravelChinaGuide.com |accessdate=2007-09-10 }}</ref><ref name="Wood1">Wood, Frances. (2008). ''China's First Emperor and His Terracotta Warriors''. Macmillan publishing. ISBN 0-312-38112-3, ISBN 978-0-312-38112-7. p 2.</ref> personal name: '''Zhao Zheng''' (Wade-Giles: '''Chao Cheng'''; {{zh|c=趙政}});<ref>At the time, female members used ancestral name and male members used clan name. 光明日报。趙正書。北大西汉竹书:发现已亡佚李斯《苍颉篇》,书中称秦始皇和秦二世为“秦王赵正(政)”、“秦王胡亥”</ref> name in classical Chinese: (趙正) was the king of the Chinese [[Qin (state)|State of Qin]] from 246 BC to 221 BC, during the [[Warring States Period]].<ref name="duik">Duiker, William J. Spielvogel, Jackson J. Edition: 5, illustrated. (2006). ''World History: Volume I: To 1800''. Thomson Higher Education publishing. ISBN 0-495-05053-9, ISBN 978-0-495-05053-7. pg 78.</ref> He became the first [[Emperor of China|emperor]] of a unified China in 221 BC.<ref name="duik" /> He ruled until his death in 210 BC at the age of 49.<ref name="Ren">Ren, Changhong. Wu, Jingyu. (2000). ''Rise and Fall of the Qin Dynasty''. Asiapac Books Pte Ltd. ISBN 981-229-172-5, ISBN 978-981-229-172-1.</ref>
   
 
Calling himself the First Emperor ({{zh|c=始皇帝}}, ''Shǐ Huángdì'') after China's unification, Qín Shǐ Huáng is a pivotal figure in Chinese history, ushering nearly two millennia of imperial rule. After unifying China, he and his chief advisor [[Li Si]] passed a series of major economic and political reforms.<ref name="duik" /> He undertook gigantic projects, including building and unifying various sections of the [[Great Wall of China]], the now famous city-sized [[Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor|mausoleum]] guarded by the life-sized [[Terracotta Army]], and a massive national road system, all at the expense of numerous lives. To ensure stability, Qin Shi Huang [[Burning of books and burying of scholars|outlawed and burned many books and buried some scholars alive]].<ref name="Ren" />
 
Calling himself the First Emperor ({{zh|c=始皇帝}}, ''Shǐ Huángdì'') after China's unification, Qín Shǐ Huáng is a pivotal figure in Chinese history, ushering nearly two millennia of imperial rule. After unifying China, he and his chief advisor [[Li Si]] passed a series of major economic and political reforms.<ref name="duik" /> He undertook gigantic projects, including building and unifying various sections of the [[Great Wall of China]], the now famous city-sized [[Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor|mausoleum]] guarded by the life-sized [[Terracotta Army]], and a massive national road system, all at the expense of numerous lives. To ensure stability, Qin Shi Huang [[Burning of books and burying of scholars|outlawed and burned many books and buried some scholars alive]].<ref name="Ren" />
Reason: ANN scored at 0.951997
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 07:44:12 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 07:44:12 PM #101816
Bradley (anonymous)

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