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ID: 1288182
User: 173.162.250.26
Article: History of the alphabet
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m (Reverted edit(s) by 67.210.176.16 identified as test/vandalism using STiki.)
(Predecessors)
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Two scripts are well attested from before the end of the fourth millennium BCE: [[cuneiform script|Mesopotamian cuneiform]] and [[Egyptian hieroglyphs]]. Both were well known in the part of the Middle East that produced the first widely used alphabet, the [[Phoenician alphabet|Phoenician]]. There are signs that cuneiform was developing alphabetic properties in some of the languages it was adapted for, as was seen again later in the [[Old Persian cuneiform script]], but it now appears these developments were a sideline and not ancestral to the alphabet.{{Citation needed|date=February 2010}} The [[Byblos syllabary]] has suggestive graphic similarities to both [[hieratic]] Egyptian and to the Phoenician alphabet, but as the Byblos syllabary is undeciphered, little can be said about its role, if any, in the history of the alphabet.{{Citation needed|date=May 2012}}
 
Two scripts are well attested from before the end of the fourth millennium BCE: [[cuneiform script|Mesopotamian cuneiform]] and [[Egyptian hieroglyphs]]. Both were well known in the part of the Middle East that produced the first widely used alphabet, the [[Phoenician alphabet|Phoenician]]. There are signs that cuneiform was developing alphabetic properties in some of the languages it was adapted for, as was seen again later in the [[Old Persian cuneiform script]], but it now appears these developments were a sideline and not ancestral to the alphabet.{{Citation needed|date=February 2010}} The [[Byblos syllabary]] has suggestive graphic similarities to both [[hieratic]] Egyptian and to the Phoenician alphabet, but as the Byblos syllabary is undeciphered, little can be said about its role, if any, in the history of the alphabet.{{Citation needed|date=May 2012}}
   
== Predecessors ==
 
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By 2700 BCE, the [[ancient Egyptians]] had developed the hieroglyphic writing system. Hieroglyphs are employed in three ways in Ancient Egyptian texts: as logograms (ideograms) that represent a word denoting an object pictorially depicted by the hieroglyph; more commonly as phonograms writing a sound or sequence of sounds; and as determinatives (which provide clues to meaning without directly writing sounds).<ref>{{cite web|url=http://csmt.uchicago.edu/glossary2004/hieroglyphics.htm|title=hieroglyphics}}</ref> Since vowels were mostly unwritten, the [[Egyptian hieroglyph#Uniliteral signs|hieroglyphs which indicated a single consonant]] could have been used as a consonantal alphabet (or "abjad"). This was not done when writing the Egyptian language, but seems to have been significant influence on the creation of the first alphabet (used to write a Semitic language). All subsequent alphabets around the world have either descended from this first Semitic alphabet, or have been inspired by one of its descendants (i.e. "[[stimulus diffusion]]"), with the possible exception of the [[Meroitic script|Meroitic alphabet]], a 3rd century BCE adaptation of hieroglyphs in [[Nubia]] to the south of Egypt&nbsp;– though even here many scholars suspect the influence of the first alphabet.{{Citation needed|date=May 2007}}
 
   
 
== Consonantal alphabets ==
 
== Consonantal alphabets ==
Reason: ANN scored at 0.903735
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Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:31:34 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:31:34 PM #101716
Bradley (anonymous)

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