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ID: 1289874
User: 67.142.181.27
Article: Product placement
Diff:
(→‎Product placement in movies: deleted vague, unreferenced info which is misplaced chronologically)
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==Placement in movies==
 
==Placement in movies==
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this is ridiculous
 
Recognizable brand names appeared in movies from cinema's earliest history. Before films were even narrative forms in the sense that they are recognised today, industrial concerns funded the making of what film scholar Tom Gunning has described as "cinematic attractions"<ref>For more detail on the Cinemas of Attractions see Tom Gunning's work: "The Cinema of Attractions: Early Film, Its Spectator and the Avant-Garde"; in Early Film ed. Thomas Elsaesser and Adam Barker (British Film Institute, 1989)</ref> these were short films of no longer than one or two minutes. In the first decade or so of film history (1895–1907) audiences did not go to see films as narrative art forms but as fairground attractions interesting for the amazing visual effects they appeared to be. This format was much better suited to product placement than the narrative form of cinema that came later when film making became a more organised industry. Taking this as a starting point, Leon Gurevitch has argued that early cinematic attractions share more in common with the adverts that emerged from the television industry in the 1950s than they do with traditional films.<ref>See Gurevitch, Leon (2010) The Cinemas of Transactions: The Exchangeable Currency of CG Attractions, Journal of Television and New Media, Sage Publications, New York, 11 (5), 367-385</ref> Gurevitch suggests that as a result, the relationship between cinema and advertising is more intertwined than previous historians have credited, suggesting that the birth of cinema was in part the result of advertising and the economic kickstart that it provided early film makers.<ref name="Gurevitch, L. 2009"/> Kerry Segrave details the industries that advertised in these early films and goes on to give a thorough account of the history of product placement over the following century.<ref>Kerry Segrave. Product Placement in Hollywood Films: A History. McFarland, 2004.</ref> In the 1920s, the weekly [[trade journal|trade periodical]] ''[[Harrison's Reports]]'' published its first denunciation of that practice with respect to [[Red Crown gasoline]] appearing in the [[comedy film]] ''[[The Garage (film)|The Garage]]'' (1919), directed by and co-starring [[Fatty Arbuckle]].<ref>''[[Harrison's Reports]]''. January 17, 1920, page 9.</ref>
 
Recognizable brand names appeared in movies from cinema's earliest history. Before films were even narrative forms in the sense that they are recognised today, industrial concerns funded the making of what film scholar Tom Gunning has described as "cinematic attractions"<ref>For more detail on the Cinemas of Attractions see Tom Gunning's work: "The Cinema of Attractions: Early Film, Its Spectator and the Avant-Garde"; in Early Film ed. Thomas Elsaesser and Adam Barker (British Film Institute, 1989)</ref> these were short films of no longer than one or two minutes. In the first decade or so of film history (1895–1907) audiences did not go to see films as narrative art forms but as fairground attractions interesting for the amazing visual effects they appeared to be. This format was much better suited to product placement than the narrative form of cinema that came later when film making became a more organised industry. Taking this as a starting point, Leon Gurevitch has argued that early cinematic attractions share more in common with the adverts that emerged from the television industry in the 1950s than they do with traditional films.<ref>See Gurevitch, Leon (2010) The Cinemas of Transactions: The Exchangeable Currency of CG Attractions, Journal of Television and New Media, Sage Publications, New York, 11 (5), 367-385</ref> Gurevitch suggests that as a result, the relationship between cinema and advertising is more intertwined than previous historians have credited, suggesting that the birth of cinema was in part the result of advertising and the economic kickstart that it provided early film makers.<ref name="Gurevitch, L. 2009"/> Kerry Segrave details the industries that advertised in these early films and goes on to give a thorough account of the history of product placement over the following century.<ref>Kerry Segrave. Product Placement in Hollywood Films: A History. McFarland, 2004.</ref> In the 1920s, the weekly [[trade journal|trade periodical]] ''[[Harrison's Reports]]'' published its first denunciation of that practice with respect to [[Red Crown gasoline]] appearing in the [[comedy film]] ''[[The Garage (film)|The Garage]]'' (1919), directed by and co-starring [[Fatty Arbuckle]].<ref>''[[Harrison's Reports]]''. January 17, 1920, page 9.</ref>
   
Reason: ANN scored at 0.886661
Reporter Information
Reporter: JimmiXzS (anonymous)
Date: Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 08:23:48 PM
Status: Reported
Thursday, the 8th of January 2015 at 11:18:13 AM #97598
zork (anonymous)

iG6gWa http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 08:23:48 PM #106561
JimmiXzS (anonymous)

c4yR5B http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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