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ID: 1295757
User: 85.14.130.163
Article: European polecat
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The European polecat is the sole ancestor of the [[ferret]], which was domesticated more than 2000 years ago for the purpose of hunting vermin.<ref name="h485"/> The species has otherwise been historically viewed negatively by humans. In the British Isles especially, the polecat was persecuted by [[gamekeeping|gamekeeper]]s, and became synonymous with [[promiscuity]] in early [[English literature]]. During modern times, the polecat is still scantly represented in popular culture when compared to other rare British mammals, and misunderstandings of its behaviour still persist in some rural areas.<ref name="bidder"/> As of 2008, it is classed by the [[IUCN]] as [[Least Concern]] due to its wide range and large numbers.<ref name="iucn"/>
 
The European polecat is the sole ancestor of the [[ferret]], which was domesticated more than 2000 years ago for the purpose of hunting vermin.<ref name="h485"/> The species has otherwise been historically viewed negatively by humans. In the British Isles especially, the polecat was persecuted by [[gamekeeping|gamekeeper]]s, and became synonymous with [[promiscuity]] in early [[English literature]]. During modern times, the polecat is still scantly represented in popular culture when compared to other rare British mammals, and misunderstandings of its behaviour still persist in some rural areas.<ref name="bidder"/> As of 2008, it is classed by the [[IUCN]] as [[Least Concern]] due to its wide range and large numbers.<ref name="iucn"/>
   
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pierre luçon
==Etymology and naming==
 
{{quote|Probably no other animal on the British list has had as many colloquial names as the polecat. In southern England it was generally referred to as 'fitchou' whereas in the north it was 'foumat or foumard... However there were a host of others including endless spelling variations: philbert, fulmer, fishock, filibart, poulcat, poll cat, etc. Charles Oldham identified at least 20 different versions of the name in the Hertfordshire/Bedfordshire area alone|Roger Lovegrove (2007)<ref name="l198">{{Harvnb|Lovegrove|2007|p=198}}</ref>}}
 
The word "polecat" first appeared after the [[Norman Conquest of England]], written as ''polcat''. While the second syllable is largely self-explanatory, the origin of the first is unclear. It is possibly derived from the [[French language|French]] ''poule'', meaning "[[chicken]]", likely in reference to the species' fondness for poultry, or it may be a variant of the [[Old English]] ''ful'', meaning "foul". In Old English, the species was referred to as ''foumart'', meaning "foul marten", in reference to its strong odour. In [[Old French]], the polecat was called ''fissau'', which was derived from the [[Low German]] and [[Scandinavian language|Scandinavian]] verb for "to make a disagreable smell". This was later corrupted in English as ''fitchew'' or ''fitchet'', which itself became the word "fitch", which is used for the polecat's pelt.<ref name="j154">{{Harvnb|Johnston|1903|p=154}}</ref> The word ''fitchet'' is the [[root word]] for the North American [[fisher (animal)|fisher]], which was named by [[Dutch colonization of the Americas|Dutch colonists in America]] who noted similarities between the two species.<ref name="Powell1">{{cite journal|last=Powell |first=R.A. |year=1981 |title=Mammalian Species: ''Martes pennanti'' |publisher=The American Society of Mammologists |pages=156:1–6 |url=http://www.science.smith.edu/departments/Biology/VHAYSSEN/msi/pdf/i0076-3519-156-01-0001.pdf}}</ref>
 
 
A 2002 article in the [[The Mammal Society]]'s ''Mammal Review'' contested the European polecat's status as an animal indigenous to the British Isles on account of a scarce [[fossil record]] and [[linguistics|linguistic]] evidence. Unlike most native British mammals, the polecat's [[Welsh language|Welsh]] name (''ffwlbart'', derived from the [[Middle English]] ''foulmart'') is not of [[Celtic languages|Celtic]] origin, much as the Welsh names of invasive species such as the [[European rabbit]] and [[fallow deer]] (''cwningen'', derived from the Middle English ''konyng'' and ''danas'', derived from the [[Old French]] ''dain'', respectively) are of Middle English or Old French origin. Polecats are not mentioned in [[Anglo-Saxon literature|Anglo-Saxon]] or [[Welsh-language literature|Welsh literature]] prior to the [[Norman conquest of England]] in 1066, with the first recorded mention of the species in the Welsh language occurring in the 14th century's ''[[The Red Book of Hergest|Llyfr Coch Hergest]]'' and in English in [[Chaucer]]’s ''[[The Pardoner’s Tale]]'' (1383). In contrast, attestations of the Welsh word for [[pine marten]] (''bele''), date back at least to the 10th century [[Welsh Law]]s and possibly much earlier in northern England.<ref name="foulmart">Brown, Duncan (2002) ''[http://www.all-about-ferrets.com/support-files/foulmart.pdf The foulmart: what’s in a name?]'' Mammal Rev., Volume 32, No. 2, 145–149</ref>
 
   
 
==Evolution==
 
==Evolution==
Reason: ANN scored at 0.972202
Reporter Information
Reporter: JimmiXzS (anonymous)
Date: Thursday, the 13th of October 2016 at 02:37:58 PM
Status: Reported
Friday, the 7th of August 2015 at 09:09:30 PM #100425
Bradley (anonymous)

vk305J http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

Thursday, the 13th of October 2016 at 02:37:58 PM #106410
JimmiXzS (anonymous)

cJblcs http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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