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ID: 1307691
User: OKCupidShrew
Article: Jenny Harrison
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{{for|the character|Jenny Harrison (Shortland Street)}}
 
{{for|the character|Jenny Harrison (Shortland Street)}}
[[File:Jenny Harrison.jpeg|thumb|right|Jenny Harrison]]'''Jenny Harrison''' is a professor of mathematics at [[UC Berkeley]]. She specializes in [[geometric analysis]] and areas in the intersection of [[algebra]], [[geometry]], and [[geometric measure theory]]. Her most important contribution to mathematics has come in recent years when she developed a theory of operator calculus that unifies an infinitesimal calculus with the classical theory of the smooth continuum, a long outstanding problem.<ref>[http://arxiv.org/abs/1101.0979] Operator Calculus - the Exterior Differential Complex, arXiv posting January 2011, 89 pages</ref> The infinitesimals are constructive and arise from methods of standard analysis, as opposed to the nonstandard analysis of [[Abraham Robinson]]. The methods apply equally well to a large class of domains called [[differential chains]] which place soap films, fractals, and charged particles, on the same footing as smooth submanifolds. The results include optimal generalizations and simplifications of the theorems of Stokes, Gauss and Green. She is also known for her counterexamples to the [[Denjoy conjecture]] and a version of the [[Seifert conjecture]]. She has pioneered applications of operator calculus (called chainlet geometry in<ref>[http://www.citebase.org/fulltext?format=application%2Fpdf&identifier=oai%3AarXiv.org%3Amath-ph%2F0501001] Lecture notes on chainlet geometry - new topological methods in geometric measure theory, arXiv posting May 24, 2005, 153 pages, Proceedings of the Ravello Summer School for Mathematical Physics, 2005</ref>) to the calculus of variations,<ref>[http://arxiv.org/abs/1106.5839] Solution to Plateau's Problem, submitted to the Annals of Mathematics, March 2010</ref> physics, and numerical analysis.
 
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[[File:Jenny Harrison.jpeg|thumb|right|Jenny Harrison]]'''Jenny Harrison''' is a professor of mathematics at [[UC Berkeley]]. She specializes in [[geometric analysis]] and areas in the intersection of [[algebra]], [[geometry]], and [[geometric measure theory]]. Her graduate studies were at the [[University of Warwick]], where [[E.C. Zeeman]] introduced her to Plateau's Problem. [[Hassler Whitney]] was her postdoctoral adviser at the [[Institute for Advanced Study]]. After her time at the Institute, she became an instructor at [[Princeton University]]. After being denied tenure, Harrison initiated a lawsuit based on gender discrimination in the 1986 tenure decision by the Berkeley mathematics department. The case attracted international attention. The 1993 settlement led to a new review of her work by a panel of seven mathematicians and science faculty who unanimously recommended tenure as a full professor.[[Stephen Smale]] and [[Robion Kirby]] were the most vocal opponents to her receiving tenure during the case, while [[Morris Hirsch]] and [[James A. Yorke|James Yorke]] were her most vocal supporters.
 
Harrison grew up in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Her graduate studies were at the [[University of Warwick]], where [[E.C. Zeeman]] introduced her to Plateau's Problem. [[Hassler Whitney]] was her postdoctoral adviser at the [[Institute for Advanced Study]]. After her time at the Institute, she became an instructor at [[Princeton University]]. She found a counterexample to the Seifert conjecture while on the faculty at [[Oxford University]]. She was struck by the duality between differentiability class of functions, and Hausdorff dimension of domains manifested in her work, as well as Sard's Theorem and Denjoy's Theorem, and observed, "The smoother the function, the rougher can be the domains in many contexts." In a Berkeley seminar in 1983 she proposed the existence of a general theory linking these together, and Operator Calculus began to evolve.
 
 
 
Jenny Harrison and Harrison Pugh recently proved that Operator Calculus is distinct from the theory of Schwartz [[distribution (mathematics)|distribution]]s and de Rham [[current (mathematics)|current]]s, settling a question posed by [[Michael Atiyah]] in 1996. Furthermore, their paper<ref>[http://arxiv.org/abs/1101.0383] Topological Aspects of Differential Chains, to appear in the Journal of Geometric Analysis, 2011</ref> showed the topological vector space of differential chains is uniquely determined by four simple axioms.
 
 
Harrison initiated a lawsuit based on gender discrimination in the 1986 tenure decision by the Berkeley mathematics department. The case attracted international attention. The 1993 settlement led to a new review of her work by a panel of seven mathematicians and science faculty who unanimously recommended tenure as a full professor. The review included her generalization of Stokes' theorem to nonsmooth domains. [[Stephen Smale]] and [[Robion Kirby]] were the most vocal opponents to her receiving tenure during the case, while [[Morris Hirsch]] and [[James A. Yorke|James Yorke]] were her most vocal supporters.
 
 
==Awards and Fellowships==
 
* [[Foundational Questions Institute]], research award, 2009
 
* [[Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science]], Miller Professor, 2007
 
* [[Rockefeller University]], Visiting Research Professor, 1996–97
 
* [[Yale University]], [[National Science Foundation]], Visiting Scholar, 1989–90
 
* Various NSF and [[DARPA]] grants in the 1980s
 
* [[Oxford University]], Tutorial Fellow, [[Somerville College]], 1978–81
 
* Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science, Miller Fellow, 1977–78
 
* [[Institute for Advanced Study]], Visiting Fellow, Princeton, 1975–76
 
* In 1971 she was awarded the first [[Marshall Scholarship]] to a student from the [[University of Alabama]] where her studies were primarily in music. The funds supported her studies in mathematics at the [[University of Warwick]].
 
 
==Selected works==
 
* Unsmoothable diffeomorphisms. [[Annals of Mathematics]], vol. 102, pp.&nbsp;85–94, 1975.
 
* Stokes' theorem for nonsmooth chains. Bulletin of the [[American Mathematical Society]], October, 1993.
 
* <math> C^2 </math> counterexamples to the Seifert conjecture. [[Topology (journal)|Topology]], vol. 27, no. 3, pp.&nbsp;249–278, 1988.
 
 
 
==External links==
 
==External links==
* [http://math.berkeley.edu/~harrison/ Harrison's webpage] - information on her life, career, research, and lawsuit
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* [http://math.berkeley.edu/~harrison/ Harrison's webpage] - her professional webpage
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* [http://articles.latimes.com/1993-05-02/magazine/tm-30007_1_jenny-harrison LA Times Article] - information about the lawsuit
 
* {{MathGenealogy|id=32887}}
 
* {{MathGenealogy|id=32887}}
   
Reason: ANN scored at 0.90596
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Thursday, the 22nd of October 2015 at 09:50:18 PM
Status: Reported
Thursday, the 1st of November 2012 at 12:18:28 AM #89222
OKCupidShrew (anonymous)

I removed a lot of totally unverified claims and extraneous information. Essentially this is a non-notable mathematician who has a lot of stuff on her page that shouldn't be there. I pared it down to what was important -- her lawsuit

Thursday, the 22nd of October 2015 at 09:50:18 PM #101901
Bradley (anonymous)

585oda http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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