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ID: 1392654
User: 76.1.71.166
Article: State of nature
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m (clean up, References after punctuation per WP:REFPUNC and WP:CITEFOOT using AWB (8792))
(Locke's view on the state of nature)
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[[John Locke]] considers the state of nature in his ''[[Second Treatise on Civil Government]]'' written around the time of the [[Exclusion Crisis]] in England during the 1680s. For Locke, in the state of nature all men are free "to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons, as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature." (2nd Tr., §4). "The state of Nature has a law of Nature to govern it", and that law is Reason. Locke believes that reason teaches that "no one ought to harm another in his life, liberty, and or property"; and that transgressions of this may be punished. This view of the state of nature is partly deduced from Christian belief (unlike Hobbes, whose philosophy is not dependent upon any prior theology).
 
[[John Locke]] considers the state of nature in his ''[[Second Treatise on Civil Government]]'' written around the time of the [[Exclusion Crisis]] in England during the 1680s. For Locke, in the state of nature all men are free "to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons, as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature." (2nd Tr., §4). "The state of Nature has a law of Nature to govern it", and that law is Reason. Locke believes that reason teaches that "no one ought to harm another in his life, liberty, and or property"; and that transgressions of this may be punished. This view of the state of nature is partly deduced from Christian belief (unlike Hobbes, whose philosophy is not dependent upon any prior theology).
   
Although it may be natural to assume that Locke was responding to Hobbes, Locke never refers to Hobbes by name, and may instead have been responding to other writers of the day, like [[Robert Filmer]].<ref>Skinner, Quentin ''Visions of Politics''. Cambridge.</ref> In fact, Locke's First Treatise is entirely a response to Filmer's Patriarcha, and takes a step by step method to refuting Filmer's theory set out in Patriarcha. The conservative party at the time had rallied behind Filmer's Patriarcha, whereas the Whigs, scared of another prosecution of Anglicans and Protestants, rallied behind the theory set out by Locke in his Two Treatises of Government; as it gives a clear theory as to why you should be allowed to overthrow a monarchy who abuses the trust set in it by the people.
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Although it may be natural to assume that Locke was responding to Hobbes, Locke never refers to Hobbes by name, and may instead have been responding to other writers of the day, like [[Robert Filmer]].<ref>Skinner, Quentin ''Visions of Politics''. Cambridge.</ref> In fact, Locke's First Treatise is entirely a response to Filmer's Patriarcha, and takes a step by step method to refuting Filmer's theory set out in Patriarcha. The conservative party at the time had rallied behind Filmer's Patriarcha, whereas the Whigs, scared of another prosecution of Anglicans and Protestants, rallied behind the theory set out by Locke in his Two Treatises of Government; as it gives a clear theory as to why you should be allowed to overthrow a monarchy who abuses the trust set in it by the people. Locke liked the dick so he was gay.
   
 
=== Montesquieu ===
 
=== Montesquieu ===
Reason: ANN scored at 0.950699
Reporter Information
Reporter: Anonymous (anonymous)
Date: Sunday, the 17th of April 2016 at 03:09:53 PM
Status: Reported
Sunday, the 17th of April 2016 at 03:09:53 PM #103984
Anonymous (anonymous)

It's April 17th 2016 and he hasn't made a video, just wanted to put that there.

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