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ID: 1395775
User: 78.146.230.47
Article: Tea
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(Cultivation and harvesting)
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The phrase "herbal tea" usually refers to infusions of fruit or herbs made without the tea plant, such as [[rosehip]] tea, [[chamomile]] tea or [[rooibos]] tea. Alternative phrases for this are [[tisane]] or herbal infusion, both bearing an implied contrast with "tea" as it is construed here.
 
The phrase "herbal tea" usually refers to infusions of fruit or herbs made without the tea plant, such as [[rosehip]] tea, [[chamomile]] tea or [[rooibos]] tea. Alternative phrases for this are [[tisane]] or herbal infusion, both bearing an implied contrast with "tea" as it is construed here.
   
==Cultivation and harvesting==
 
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[[File:Cameron Highland Tea Plantation 2012.JPG|thumb|A tea plantation in the [[Cameron Highlands]] in [[Malaysia]]]]
 
 
''[[Camellia sinensis]]'' is an [[evergreen]] plant that grows mainly in [[Tropical climate|tropical]] and [[Subtropics|subtropical]] climates.<ref name="hort.purdue" /> Some varieties can also tolerate [[oceanic climate|marine climates]] and are cultivated as far north as [[Pembrokeshire]] in the British mainland<ref>{{cite web |first=Robin |last=Turner |title=Duo plant tea in Wales |url=http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/2009/10/03/duo-plant-tea-in-wales-91466-24840816/ |publisher=[[Wales Online]] |date=October 3, 2009 |accessdate=April 26, 2011}}</ref> and [[Washington (state)|Washington]] in the United States.<ref>{{cite web |title=Tea |url=http://69.93.14.225/wscpr/LibraryDocs/Tea2010.pdf |format=PDF |work=The Compendium of Washington Agriculture |publisher=Washington State Commission on Pesticide Registration |year=2010 |accessdate=April 26, 2011}}</ref>
 
[[File:Organic mountain grown tea leaf.jpg|thumb|Leaves of ''Camellia sinensis'', the tea plant]]
 
Tea plants are propagated from seed and by cutting; it takes about 4 to 12 years for a tea plant to bear seed, and about three years before a new plant is ready for harvesting.<ref name="hort.purdue">{{cite web | url=http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/duke_energy/camellia_sinensis.html | title=Camellia Sinensis | publisher=Purdue University Center for New Crops and Plants Products | accessdate=2010-10-26}}</ref> In addition to a [[hardiness zone|zone 8]] climate or warmer, tea plants require at least 127&nbsp;cm (50&nbsp;inches) of rainfall a year and prefer [[Soil pH|acidic soils]].<ref>{{cite book |title=Camellias: A Practical Gardening Guide |last=Rolfe |first=Jim |coauthors=Yvonne Cave |year=2003 |publisher=Timber Press |isbn=0-88192-577-2 }}</ref> Many high-quality tea plants are cultivated at elevations of up to {{convert|1500|m|ft|abbr=on}} above sea level: at these heights, the plants grow more slowly and acquire a better flavor.<ref>{{cite book |title=Tea Cuisine: A New Approach to Flavoring Contemporary and Traditional Dishes |last=Pruess |first=Joanna |year=2006 |publisher=Globe Pequot |isbn=1-59228-741-7 }}</ref>
 
 
Only the top 1-2&nbsp;inches of the mature plant are picked. These buds and leaves are called "flushes".<ref>{{cite book |author=Elizabeth S. Hayes |title=Spices and Herbs: Lore and Cookery |url=http://books.google.com/?id=htsIVCwRsEcC&dq= |publisher=Courier Dover Publications |year=1980 |isbn=0-486-24026-6|accessdate=2008-09-20 |page=74}}</ref> A plant will grow a new flush every seven to 15 days during the growing season, and leaves that are slow in development always produce better-flavored teas.<ref name="hort.purdue"/>
 
 
A tea plant will grow into a [[tree]] of up to {{convert|16|m|ft|abbr=on}} if left undisturbed,<ref name="hort.purdue" /> but cultivated plants are pruned to waist height for ease of plucking.<ref name="Tea Cultivation">[http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/585098/tea Britannica Tea Cultivation]. Retrieved June 2007.</ref>
 
 
Two principal varieties are used: the China plant (''C. s. sinensis''), used for most Chinese, Formosan and Japanese teas (but not [[Pu-erh]]); and the clonal [[Assam]] tea plant (''C. s. assamica''), used in most Indian and other teas (but not [[Darjeeling tea|Darjeeling]]). Within these botanical varieties, there are many strains and modern Indian clonal varieties. Leaf size is the chief criterion for the classification of tea plants,<ref name=Mondal519>{{Harvnb|Mondal|2007|p=519}}</ref> with three primary classifications being: [[Assam]] type, characterized by the largest leaves; China type, characterized by the smallest leaves; and Cambod, characterized by leaves of intermediate size.<ref name=Mondal519/><ref>{{cite web|url=http://teahorse.co.uk/info/what-tea/ |title=What is Tea? |publisher=teahorse.co.uk |date= |accessdate=2012-03-09}}</ref>
 
   
 
==Processing and classification==
 
==Processing and classification==
Reason: ANN scored at 0.965128
Reporter Information
Reporter: Mark (anonymous)
Date: Thursday, the 12th of May 2016 at 08:40:25 AM
Status: Reported
Thursday, the 12th of May 2016 at 08:40:25 AM #104351
Mark (anonymous)

dv9Z8j http://www.y7YwKx7Pm6OnyJvolbcwrWdoEnRF29pb.com

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