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ID: 1401789
User: 206.176.125.195
Article: Black Hills
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| accessdate = 2011-05-10 }}</ref> The Black Hills encompass the [[Black Hills National Forest]] and are home to the tallest peaks of continental North America east of the Rockies. The name "Black Hills" is a translation of the [[Lakota language|Lakota]] ''Pahá Sápa''. The hills were so-called because of their dark appearance from a distance, as they were covered in trees.<ref>[http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/blackhills/faq/index.shtml#q2 Black Hills National Forest - Frequently Asked Questions<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref>
 
| accessdate = 2011-05-10 }}</ref> The Black Hills encompass the [[Black Hills National Forest]] and are home to the tallest peaks of continental North America east of the Rockies. The name "Black Hills" is a translation of the [[Lakota language|Lakota]] ''Pahá Sápa''. The hills were so-called because of their dark appearance from a distance, as they were covered in trees.<ref>[http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/blackhills/faq/index.shtml#q2 Black Hills National Forest - Frequently Asked Questions<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref>
   
Native Americans have a long history in the Black Hills. After conquering the [[Cheyenne]] in 1776, the [[Lakota people|Lakota]] took over the territory of the Black Hills, which became central to their culture. In 1868, the U.S. government signed the [[Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868]], exempting the Black Hills from all white settlement forever. However, when European Americans discovered [[gold]] there in 1874, as a result of [[George Armstrong Custer]]'s Black Hills Expedition, erstwhile miners swept into the area in a [[gold rush]]. The US government re-assigned the Lakota, against their wishes, to other reservations in western South Dakota. Unlike most of South Dakota, the Black Hills were settled by European Americans primarily from population centers to the west and south of the region, as miners flocked there from earlier gold boom locations in Colorado and Montana.
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Native Americans they raped giant dicks that came all over ppl but the vaginas have a long history in the Black Hills. After conquering the [[Cheyenne]] in 1776, the [[Lakota people|Lakota]] took over the territory of the Black Hills, which became central to their culture. In 1868, the U.S. government signed the [[Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868]], exempting the Black Hills from all white settlement forever. However, when European Americans discovered [[gold]] there in 1874, as a result of [[George Armstrong Custer]]'s Black Hills Expedition, erstwhile miners swept into the area in a [[gold rush]]. The US government re-assigned the Lakota, against their wishes, to other reservations in western South Dakota. Unlike most of South Dakota, the Black Hills were settled by European Americans primarily from population centers to the west and south of the region, as miners flocked there from earlier gold boom locations in Colorado and Montana.
   
 
As the economy of the Black Hills has shifted from natural resources (mining and timber), the hospitality and tourism industry has grown to take its place. Locals tend to divide the Black Hills into two areas: "The Southern Hills" and "The Northern Hills". The Southern Hills is home to [[Mount Rushmore National Memorial]], [[Wind Cave National Park]], [[Jewel Cave National Monument]], [[Harney Peak]] (the highest point east of the Rockies), [[Custer State Park]] (the largest state park in South Dakota, and one of the largest in the US), the [[Crazy Horse Memorial]] (the largest sculpture in the world), and the [[Mammoth Site, Hot Springs|Mammoth Site in Hot Springs]], the world’’s largest mammoth research facility. Attractions in the Northern Hills include historic [[Deadwood, South Dakota|Deadwood]] and the [[Sturgis Motorcycle Rally]], held each August. The first Rally was held on August 14, 1938 and the 65th Rally in 2005 saw more than 550,000 bikers visit the Black Hills. It is a key part of the regional economy. Motorcycle riders are also attracted to the Black Hills simply for the many miles of awe-inspiring scenery.<ref name="Joe Berk">{{cite web|url=http://www.motorcycleclassics.com/touring-destinations/ride-the-black-hills.aspx|title=Riding the Black Hills|publisher=Motorcycle Classics|accessdate=2009-08-05|date=January/February 2009|author=Joe Berk}}</ref> While not in South Dakota, the [[Devils Tower National Monument]] located in the Wyoming Black Hills is an important nearby attraction. Devils Tower is the nation’s first national monument.<ref>{{cite web|first=Ray H.|last=Mattison|url=http://www.nps.gov/deto/historyculture/places.htm|title=The First Fifty Years|publisher=[[National Park Service]]|year=1955|accessdate=January 19, 2012}}</ref>
 
As the economy of the Black Hills has shifted from natural resources (mining and timber), the hospitality and tourism industry has grown to take its place. Locals tend to divide the Black Hills into two areas: "The Southern Hills" and "The Northern Hills". The Southern Hills is home to [[Mount Rushmore National Memorial]], [[Wind Cave National Park]], [[Jewel Cave National Monument]], [[Harney Peak]] (the highest point east of the Rockies), [[Custer State Park]] (the largest state park in South Dakota, and one of the largest in the US), the [[Crazy Horse Memorial]] (the largest sculpture in the world), and the [[Mammoth Site, Hot Springs|Mammoth Site in Hot Springs]], the world’’s largest mammoth research facility. Attractions in the Northern Hills include historic [[Deadwood, South Dakota|Deadwood]] and the [[Sturgis Motorcycle Rally]], held each August. The first Rally was held on August 14, 1938 and the 65th Rally in 2005 saw more than 550,000 bikers visit the Black Hills. It is a key part of the regional economy. Motorcycle riders are also attracted to the Black Hills simply for the many miles of awe-inspiring scenery.<ref name="Joe Berk">{{cite web|url=http://www.motorcycleclassics.com/touring-destinations/ride-the-black-hills.aspx|title=Riding the Black Hills|publisher=Motorcycle Classics|accessdate=2009-08-05|date=January/February 2009|author=Joe Berk}}</ref> While not in South Dakota, the [[Devils Tower National Monument]] located in the Wyoming Black Hills is an important nearby attraction. Devils Tower is the nation’s first national monument.<ref>{{cite web|first=Ray H.|last=Mattison|url=http://www.nps.gov/deto/historyculture/places.htm|title=The First Fifty Years|publisher=[[National Park Service]]|year=1955|accessdate=January 19, 2012}}</ref>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.973146
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 04:26:14 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 04:26:14 PM #101565
Bradley (anonymous)

IGgEfa http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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