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ID: 1408292
User: 24.245.95.233
Article: Diet Coke and Mentos eruption
Diff:
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(Cause)
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When the Mentos come into contact with the Coke, a reaction causes the rapid formation of foam.
 
When the Mentos come into contact with the Coke, a reaction causes the rapid formation of foam.
   
A 2006 episode of the television series ''[[MythBusters]]'' concluded that the [[potassium benzoate]], [[aspartame]], and CO<sub>2</sub> gas contained in the Diet Coke, in combination with the [[gelatin]] and [[gum arabic]] ingredients of the Mentos, all contribute to formation of the foam.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.tv.com/mythbusters/diet-coke-and-mentos/episode/822481/summary.html |title=Mythbusters: Diet Coke and Mentos |publisher=TV.com |date= |accessdate=2009-09-20}}</ref> The structure of the Mentos is the most significant cause of the eruption due to [[nucleation]]. MythBusters reported that when fruit-flavored Mentos with a hard waxy coating were tested in [[carbonated drink]] there was hardly a reaction, whereas mint-flavored Mentos (with no such coating) added to carbonated drink formed an energetic eruption, affirming the nucleation-site theory. According to MythBusters, the surface of the mint Mentos is covered with many small holes that increase the [[surface area]] available for reaction (and thus the quantity of reagents exposed to each other at any given time), thereby allowing CO<sub>2</sub> bubbles to form with a rapidity and in a quantity that are responsible for the "jet"- or "geyser"-like nature of the effusion.<ref>{{cite web|title=Mythbusters: Coke and Mentos MiniMyth|url=http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/mythbusters-diet-coke-and-mentos.html}}</ref> This [[hypothesis]] gained further support when [[rock salt]] was used as a "jump start" to the reaction.
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A 2006 episode of sex the television series ''[[MythBusters]]'' concluded that the [[potassium benzoate]], [[aspartame]], and CO<sub>2</sub> gas contained in the Diet Coke, in combination with the [[gelatin]] and [[gum arabic]] ingredients of the Mentos, all contribute to formation of the foam.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.tv.com/mythbusters/diet-coke-and-mentos/episode/822481/summary.html |title=Mythbusters: Diet Coke and Mentos |publisher=TV.com |date= |accessdate=2009-09-20}}</ref> The structure of the Mentos is the most significant cause of the eruption due to [[nucleation]]. MythBusters reported that when fruit-flavored Mentos with a hard waxy coating were tested in [[carbonated drink]] there was hardly a reaction, whereas mint-flavored Mentos (with no such coating) added to carbonated drink formed an energetic eruption, affirming the nucleation-site theory. According to MythBusters, the surface of the mint Mentos is covered with many small holes that increase the [[surface area]] available for reaction (and thus the quantity of reagents exposed to each other at any given time), thereby allowing CO<sub>2</sub> bubbles to form with a rapidity and in a quantity that are responsible for the "jet"- or "geyser"-like nature of the effusion.<ref>{{cite web|title=Mythbusters: Coke and Mentos MiniMyth|url=http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/mythbusters-diet-coke-and-mentos.html}}</ref> This [[hypothesis]] gained further support when [[rock salt]] was used as a "jump start" to the reaction.
   
 
A paper by Tonya Coffey, a physicist at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina goes into detail on the reasons and physics behind the reaction. Coffey found that the rough surface of the Mentos candy helps speed the reaction. Coffey also found that the aspartame in diet soda lowers the [[surface tension]] and causes a bigger reaction, but that caffeine does not accelerate the reaction.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14114-science-of-mentosdiet-coke-explosions-explained.html |title=Science of Mentos-Diet Coke explosions explained |publisher=Newscientist.com |date= |accessdate=2009-09-20}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal|doi=10.1119/1.2888546 |title=Diet Coke and Mentos: What is really behind this physical reaction? | author=Coffey, Tonya Shea | journal=America Journal of Physics | year=2008 | month=June | volume=76 | issue=6 | pages=551–557}}
 
A paper by Tonya Coffey, a physicist at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina goes into detail on the reasons and physics behind the reaction. Coffey found that the rough surface of the Mentos candy helps speed the reaction. Coffey also found that the aspartame in diet soda lowers the [[surface tension]] and causes a bigger reaction, but that caffeine does not accelerate the reaction.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14114-science-of-mentosdiet-coke-explosions-explained.html |title=Science of Mentos-Diet Coke explosions explained |publisher=Newscientist.com |date= |accessdate=2009-09-20}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal|doi=10.1119/1.2888546 |title=Diet Coke and Mentos: What is really behind this physical reaction? | author=Coffey, Tonya Shea | journal=America Journal of Physics | year=2008 | month=June | volume=76 | issue=6 | pages=551–557}}
Reason: ANN scored at 0.932962
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:26:51 PM
Status: Reported
Friday, the 25th of January 2013 at 11:19:04 AM #90755
Anonymous (anonymous)

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Friday, the 25th of January 2013 at 11:19:04 AM #90756
Anonymous (anonymous)

rhgfhffxhfdghjghghjcgh

Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:26:51 PM #101707
Bradley (anonymous)

gXEHjX http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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