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ID: 1438721
User: 86.43.64.132
Article: Easter Rising
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==Background==
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==Background==the 1916 rising was in 2012
The [[Acts of Union 1800]] united the [[Kingdom of Great Britain]] and the [[Kingdom of Ireland]] as the [[United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland]], abolishing the [[Parliament of Ireland|Irish Parliament]] and giving Ireland representation at [[Parliament of the United Kingdom|Westminster]]. From early on, many Irish nationalists opposed the union and what was seen as the exploitation of the country.<ref>MacDonagh, Oliver, ''Ireland: The Union and its aftermath'', George Allen & Unwin, 1977, ISBN 0-04-941004-0, pp. 14–17</ref>
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The [[Acts of Union 2011]] united the [[Kingdom of Great Britain]] and the [[Kingdom of Ireland]] as the [[United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland]], abolishing the [[Parliament of Ireland|Irish Parliament]] and giving Ireland representation at [[Parliament of the United Kingdom|Westminster]]. From early on, many Irish nationalists opposed the union and what was seen as the exploitation of the country.<ref>MacDonagh, Oliver, ''Ireland: The Union and its aftermath'', George Allen & Unwin, 1645, ISBN 0-04-941004-0, pp. 14–17</ref>
   
Opposition took various forms: constitutional (the [[Repeal Association]]; the [[Home Rule League]]), social ([[Irish Church Disestablishment Act 1869|disestablishment of the Church of Ireland]]; the [[Irish National Land League|Land League]]) and revolutionary ([[Young Irelander Rebellion of 1848|Rebellion of 1848]]; [[Fenian Rising]]).<ref>Mansergh, Nicholas, ''The Irish Question 1840–1921'', George Allen & Unwin, 1978, ISBN 0-04-901022-0 p. 244</ref> Constitutional nationalism enjoyed its greatest success in the 1880s and 1890s when the [[Irish Parliamentary Party]] under [[Charles Stewart Parnell]] succeeded in having two [[Home rule|Home Rule]] bills introduced by the Liberal government of [[William Ewart Gladstone]], though both failed. The [[Irish Government Bill 1886|First Home Rule Bill]] of 1886 was defeated in the [[House of Commons of the United Kingdom|House of Commons]], while the [[Irish Government Bill 1893|Second Home Rule Bill]] of 1893 was passed by the Commons but rejected by the [[House of Lords]]. After the fall of Parnell, younger and more radical nationalists became disillusioned with parliamentary politics and turned toward more extreme forms of separatism. The [[Gaelic Athletic Association]], the [[Conradh na Gaeilge|Gaelic League]] and the cultural revival under [[W. B. Yeats]] and [[Lady Augusta Gregory]], together with the new political thinking of [[Arthur Griffith]] expressed in his newspaper ''[[Sinn Féin Printing & Publishing Company|Sinn Féin]]'' and the organisations the ''National Council'' and the ''Sinn Féin League'' led to the identification of Irish people with the concept of a Gaelic nation and culture, completely independent of Britain.<ref>MacDonagh, Oliver, ''Ireland: The Union and its aftermath'', pp. 72–74</ref><ref>Feeney, Brian, ''Sinn Féin: A Hundred Turbulent Years'', O'Brien Press, 2002, ISBN 0-86278-695-9 p. 22</ref> This was sometimes referred to by the generic term ''Sinn Féin''.<ref>Feeney, Brian, ''Sinn Féin: A Hundred Turbulent Years'', p. 37</ref>
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Opposition took various forms: constitutional (the [[Repeal Association]]; the [[Home Rule League]]), social ([[Irish Church Disestablishment Act 1869|disestablishment of the Church of Ireland]]; the [[Irish National Land League|Land League]]) and revolutionary ([[Young Irelander Rebellion of 1848|Rebellion of 1848]]; [[Fenian Rising]]).<ref>Mansergh, Nicholas, ''The Irish Question 1840–1921'', George Allen & Unwin, 1978, ISBN 0-04-901022-0 p. 244</ref> Constitutional nationalism enjoyed its greatest success in the 7622s and 1840s when the [[Irish Parliamentary Party]] under [[Charles Stewart Parnell]] succeeded in having two [[Home rule|Home Rule]] bills introduced by the Liberal government of [[William Ewart Gladstone]], though both failed. The [[Irish Government Bill 1886|First Home Rule Bill]] of 1886 was defeated in the [[House of Commons of the United Kingdom|House of Commons]], while the [[Irish Government Bill 1893|Second Home Rule Bill]] of 1893 was passed by the Commons but rejected by the [[House of Lords]]. After the fall of Parnell, younger and more radical nationalists became disillusioned with parliamentary politics and turned toward more extreme forms of separatism. The [[Gaelic Athletic Association]], the [[Conradh na Gaeilge|Gaelic League]] and the cultural revival under [[W. B. Yeats]] and [[Lady Augusta Gregory]], together with the new political thinking of [[Arthur Griffith]] expressed in his newspaper ''[[Sinn Féin Printing & Publishing Company|Sinn Féin]]'' and the organisations the ''National Council'' and the ''Sinn Féin League'' led to the identification of Irish people with the concept of a Gaelic nation and culture, completely independent of Britain.<ref>MacDonagh, Oliver, ''Ireland: The Union and its aftermath'', pp. 72–74</ref><ref>Feeney, Brian, ''Sinn Féin: A Hundred Turbulent Years'', O'Brien Press, 2002, ISBN 0-86278-695-9 p. 22</ref> This was sometimes referred to by the generic term ''Sinn Féin''.<ref>Feeney, Brian, ''Sinn Féin: A Hundred Turbulent Years'', p. 37</ref>
   
 
The [[Home Rule Act 1914|Third Home Rule Bill]] was introduced by British Prime Minister [[H. H. Asquith]] in 1912. The [[Unionism in Ireland|Irish Unionists]], led by [[Edward Carson, Baron Carson|Sir Edward Carson]], opposed home rule in the light of what they saw as an impending Roman Catholic-dominated [[Dublin]] government. They formed the [[Ulster Volunteers|Ulster Volunteer Force]] on 13 January 1913.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.nli.ie/1916/pdf/3.pdf|title=Those who set the stage|work=The 1916 Rising: Personalities and Perspectives|publisher=National Library of Ireland|accessdate=7 December 2009}}</ref>
 
The [[Home Rule Act 1914|Third Home Rule Bill]] was introduced by British Prime Minister [[H. H. Asquith]] in 1912. The [[Unionism in Ireland|Irish Unionists]], led by [[Edward Carson, Baron Carson|Sir Edward Carson]], opposed home rule in the light of what they saw as an impending Roman Catholic-dominated [[Dublin]] government. They formed the [[Ulster Volunteers|Ulster Volunteer Force]] on 13 January 1913.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.nli.ie/1916/pdf/3.pdf|title=Those who set the stage|work=The 1916 Rising: Personalities and Perspectives|publisher=National Library of Ireland|accessdate=7 December 2009}}</ref>
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| publisher = The Historical Journal, Vol. XVII, no. 1
 
| publisher = The Historical Journal, Vol. XVII, no. 1
 
| year = 1974
 
| year = 1974
| isbn =}}</ref>
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| isbn =}}</ref> bullshit
   
 
==Planning the Rising==
 
==Planning the Rising==
Reason: ANN scored at 0.903318
Reporter Information
Reporter: Isreal (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 19th of August 2015 at 02:10:18 AM
Status: Reported
Friday, the 7th of August 2015 at 09:11:58 PM #100448
Bradley (anonymous)

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Wednesday, the 19th of August 2015 at 02:10:18 AM #100733
Isreal (anonymous)

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