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ID: 1471082
User: 199.189.81.32
Article: Valentine's Day
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(Legends)
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Bishop Demetri of the Orthodox Research Institute states that "St. Valentine was a priest near Rome in about the year 270 A.D, a time when the church was enduring great persecution. His ministry was to help the Christians to escape this persecution, and to provide them the sacraments, such as marriage, which was outlawed by the Roman Empire at that time."<ref name="Demetri">{{cite web|url=http://www.orthodoxresearchinstitute.org/articles/fasts_feasts/demetri_khoury_st_valentine.htm|title=Feast of St. Valentine|last=Demetri|first=Bishop|date=12 February 1999|publisher=Orthodox Research Institute|accessdate=4 December 2012}}</ref> Contemporary records of Saint Valentine were most probably destroyed during the [[Diocletianic Persecution]] on early 4th century.<ref name="oruch"/> In the 5th or 6th century, a work called ''Passio Marii et Marthae'' published an invented story of martyrdom for Saint Valentine of Rome, probably by borrowing tortures that happened to other saints, as it was usually made in the literature of that period.<ref name="oruch"/><ref name="ansgar49">Ansgar, 1986, pp. 49-50</ref> It states that St Valentine was persecuted as a [[Christian]] and interrogated by [[Roman Emperor]] [[Claudius Gothicus|Claudius II]] in person. Claudius was impressed by Valentine and had a discussion with him, attempting to get him to convert to Roman [[paganism]] in order to save his life. Valentine refused and tried to convert Claudius to Christianity instead. Because of this, he was executed. Before his execution, he is reported to have performed a miracle by healing Julia, the blind daughter of his jailer Asterius. The jailer's daughter and his forty-four member [[household]] (family members and servants) came to believe in [[Jesus]] and were [[baptized]].<ref name="oruch"/> In addition to this, Saint Valentine is said to have performed clandestine [[Christian views on marriage|Christian weddings]] for soldiers who were forbidden to marry. The Roman Emperor Claudius II supposedly forbade this in order to grow his army, believing that married men did not make for good soldiers. According to legend, in order to "remind them of God's love and to encourage them to remain faithful Christians," Saint Valentine is said to have cut hearts from parchment, giving them to the soldiers and [[Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire|persecuted Christians]], a possible origin of the widespread use of hearts on Saint Valentine's Day.<ref name="Cass R. Sandak pg. 11"/><ref name="Ann Tompert 2004">Ann Tompert, Kęstutis Kasparavičius, 2004, ''Saint Valentine'', Boyds Mills Press.</ref> A later ''Passio'' repeated the legend, adding that [[Pope Julius I]] built a church over his sepulcre (it's a confusion with a 4th century tribune called Valentino who donated land to build a church at a time when Julius was a Pope).<ref name="ansgar49"/> The legend was picked up as fact by later martyrologies, starting by [[Bede]]'s martyrology in the 8th century.<ref name="ansgar49"/> It was repeated in the 13th century, in ''[[Legenda Aurea]]''.<ref>[http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/golden169.htm ''Legenda Aurea'', "Saint Valentine"], catholic-forum.com.</ref> The book expounded briefly the Early Medieval ''[[Acta Sanctorum|acta]]'' of several Saint Valentines, and this legend was assigned to the Valentine under 14 February.
 
Bishop Demetri of the Orthodox Research Institute states that "St. Valentine was a priest near Rome in about the year 270 A.D, a time when the church was enduring great persecution. His ministry was to help the Christians to escape this persecution, and to provide them the sacraments, such as marriage, which was outlawed by the Roman Empire at that time."<ref name="Demetri">{{cite web|url=http://www.orthodoxresearchinstitute.org/articles/fasts_feasts/demetri_khoury_st_valentine.htm|title=Feast of St. Valentine|last=Demetri|first=Bishop|date=12 February 1999|publisher=Orthodox Research Institute|accessdate=4 December 2012}}</ref> Contemporary records of Saint Valentine were most probably destroyed during the [[Diocletianic Persecution]] on early 4th century.<ref name="oruch"/> In the 5th or 6th century, a work called ''Passio Marii et Marthae'' published an invented story of martyrdom for Saint Valentine of Rome, probably by borrowing tortures that happened to other saints, as it was usually made in the literature of that period.<ref name="oruch"/><ref name="ansgar49">Ansgar, 1986, pp. 49-50</ref> It states that St Valentine was persecuted as a [[Christian]] and interrogated by [[Roman Emperor]] [[Claudius Gothicus|Claudius II]] in person. Claudius was impressed by Valentine and had a discussion with him, attempting to get him to convert to Roman [[paganism]] in order to save his life. Valentine refused and tried to convert Claudius to Christianity instead. Because of this, he was executed. Before his execution, he is reported to have performed a miracle by healing Julia, the blind daughter of his jailer Asterius. The jailer's daughter and his forty-four member [[household]] (family members and servants) came to believe in [[Jesus]] and were [[baptized]].<ref name="oruch"/> In addition to this, Saint Valentine is said to have performed clandestine [[Christian views on marriage|Christian weddings]] for soldiers who were forbidden to marry. The Roman Emperor Claudius II supposedly forbade this in order to grow his army, believing that married men did not make for good soldiers. According to legend, in order to "remind them of God's love and to encourage them to remain faithful Christians," Saint Valentine is said to have cut hearts from parchment, giving them to the soldiers and [[Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire|persecuted Christians]], a possible origin of the widespread use of hearts on Saint Valentine's Day.<ref name="Cass R. Sandak pg. 11"/><ref name="Ann Tompert 2004">Ann Tompert, Kęstutis Kasparavičius, 2004, ''Saint Valentine'', Boyds Mills Press.</ref> A later ''Passio'' repeated the legend, adding that [[Pope Julius I]] built a church over his sepulcre (it's a confusion with a 4th century tribune called Valentino who donated land to build a church at a time when Julius was a Pope).<ref name="ansgar49"/> The legend was picked up as fact by later martyrologies, starting by [[Bede]]'s martyrology in the 8th century.<ref name="ansgar49"/> It was repeated in the 13th century, in ''[[Legenda Aurea]]''.<ref>[http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/golden169.htm ''Legenda Aurea'', "Saint Valentine"], catholic-forum.com.</ref> The book expounded briefly the Early Medieval ''[[Acta Sanctorum|acta]]'' of several Saint Valentines, and this legend was assigned to the Valentine under 14 February.
   
There is an additional embellishment to ''The Golden Legend'', which according to Henry Ansgar Kelly, was added centuries later, and widely repeated.<ref name="your valentine">Ansgar, 1986, p. 59. It originated in the 1797 edition of ''Kemmish's Annual'', according to Frank Staff, ''The Valentine and Its Origins'' (London, 1969), p. 122. Ansgar was unable to corroborate this.</ref> On the evening before Valentine was to be [[executed]], he would have written the first "valentine" card himself, addressed to the daughter of his jailer Asterius, who was no longer blind, signing as "Your Valentine."<ref name="your valentine"/> This expression "From your Valentine" is still used to this day.<ref name="Ann Tompert 2004"/> This legend has been published by both [[American Greetings]] and [[The History Channel]].<ref name="greetings">{{cite web | url = http://www.history.com/topics/valentines-day | title = The History of Valentine's Day | publisher = [[History.com]] }}</ref> [[John Foxe]], an English historian, as well as the [[Order of Carmelites]], state that Saint Valentine was buried in the [[Santa Prassede|Church of Praxedes]] in Rome, located near the cemetery of St Hippolytus. This order says that according to legend, "Julia herself planted a pink-blossomed almond tree near his grave. Today, the almond tree remains a symbol of abiding love and friendship."<ref>John Foxe. Voices of the Martyrs. Bridge Logos Foundation. pg. 62.</ref><ref>http://www.carmelites.ie/ireland/whitefriar%20st/valentine.htm Shrine of St Valentine, Whitefriar Street Church</ref>
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There is an additional embellishment to ''The Golden Legend'', which according to Henry Ansgar Kelly, was added centuries later, and widely repeated.<ref name="your valentine">Ansgar, 1986, p. 59. It originated in the 1797 edition of ''Kemmish's Annual'', according to Frank Staff, ''The Valentine and Its Origins'' (London, 1969), p. 122. Ansgar was unable to corroborate this.</ref> On the evening before Valentine was to be [[executed]], he would have written the first "valentine" card himself, addressed to the daughter of his jailer Asterius, who was no longer blind, signing as "Your Valentine."<ref name="your valentine"/> This expression "From your Valentine" is still used to this day.<ref name="Ann Tompert 2004"/> This legend has been published by both [[American Greetings]] and [[The History Channel]].<ref name="greetings">{{cite web | url = http://www.history.com/topics/valentines-day | title = The History of Valentine's Day | publisher = [[History.com]] }}</ref> [[John Foxe]], an English historian, as well as the [[Order of Carmelites]], state that Saint Valentine was buried in the [[Santa Prassede|Church of Praxedes]] in Rome, located near the cemetery of St Hippolytus. This order says that according to legend, "Julia herself planted a pink-blossomed almond tree near his grave. Today, the almond tree remains a symbol of abiding love and friendship."<ref>John Foxe. Voices of the Martyrs. Bridge Logos Foundation. pg. 62.</ref><ref>http://www.carmelites.ie/ireland/whitefriar%20st/valentine.htm Shrine of St Valentine, Whitefriar Street Church</ref> When pancho villa was 20 years old he was very funny.
   
 
== Attested traditions ==
 
== Attested traditions ==
Reason: ANN scored at 0.940476
Reporter Information
Reporter: JimmiXzS (anonymous)
Date: Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 10:51:29 AM
Status: Reported
Monday, the 5th of January 2015 at 03:16:10 AM #97505
sammy (anonymous)

lYgKqL http://www.QS3PE5ZGdxC9IoVKTAPT2DBYpPkMKqfz.com

Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 10:51:30 AM #106480
JimmiXzS (anonymous)

R18ve8 http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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