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ID: 1506449
User: 158.59.229.112
Article: Polonium
Diff:
(Isotopes)
(Tag: section blanking)
(Compounds)
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{{cite journal|last1= Momoshima | first1 =N.|last2= Song | first2 =L.X.|last3= Osaki | first3 =S.|last4=Maeda | first4 =Y.| title = Biologically induced Po emission from fresh water | journal =J Environ Radioact.| year = 2002 | volume = 63| issue = 2| page= 187 | doi =10.1016/S0265-931X(02)00028-0}}</ref> This is similar to the way in which [[mercury (element)|mercury]], [[selenium]] and [[tellurium]] are methylated in living things to create [[organometallic]] compounds. As a result when considering the biochemistry of polonium one should consider the possibility that polonium will follow the same biochemical pathways as selenium and tellurium.
 
{{cite journal|last1= Momoshima | first1 =N.|last2= Song | first2 =L.X.|last3= Osaki | first3 =S.|last4=Maeda | first4 =Y.| title = Biologically induced Po emission from fresh water | journal =J Environ Radioact.| year = 2002 | volume = 63| issue = 2| page= 187 | doi =10.1016/S0265-931X(02)00028-0}}</ref> This is similar to the way in which [[mercury (element)|mercury]], [[selenium]] and [[tellurium]] are methylated in living things to create [[organometallic]] compounds. As a result when considering the biochemistry of polonium one should consider the possibility that polonium will follow the same biochemical pathways as selenium and tellurium.
   
 
ormate]], hydroxide, [[nitrate]], selenate, monosulfide, [[sulfate]] and disulfate.<ref name=figgins>Figgins, P. E. (1961) [http://www.osti.gov/bridge/purl.cover.jsp?purl=/4034029-SolPsF/ The Radiochemistry of Polonium], National Academy of Sciences, US Atomic Energy Commission, pp. 13–14 [http://books.google.com/books?id=N0MrAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover Google Books]</ref><ref>Bagnall, pp. 212–226</ref>
====Compounds====
 
Polonium has no common compounds, only synthetically created ones, and more than 50 of those are known.<ref>Bagnall, p. 199</ref> The most stable class of polonium compounds are [[polonide]]s, which are prepared by direct reaction of two elements. Na<sub>2</sub>Po has the [[antifluorite]] structure, the polonides of Ca, Ba, Hg, Pb and lanthanides form a NaCl lattice, BePo and CdPo have the [[wurtzite]] and MgPo the [[nickel arsenide]] structure. Most polonides decompose upon heating to about 600 °C, except for HgPo that decomposes at ~300 °C and the lanthanide polonides, which do not decompose but melt at temperatures above 1000 °C. For example PrPo melts at 1250 °C and TmPo at 2200 °C.<ref name=g766>Greenwood, p. 766</ref>
 
 
[[Polonium hydride]] ({{chem|Po||H|2}}) is a volatile liquid at room temperature prone to dissociation.<ref name=g766/> The two oxides [[polonium dioxide|PoO<sub>2</sub>]] and [[polonium trioxide|PoO<sub>3</sub>]] are the products of oxidation of polonium.<ref>{{cite book| author = Holleman, A. F.; Wiberg, E. |title = Inorganic Chemistry| publisher = Academic Press| location = San Diego| year = 2001| isbn = 0-12-352651-5}}</ref>
 
 
[[Halide]]s of the structure PoX<sub>2</sub>, PoX<sub>4</sub> and PoX<sub>6</sub> are known. They are soluble in the corresponding hydrogen halides, i.e., PoCl<sub>X</sub> in HCl, PoBr<sub>X</sub> in HBr and PoI<sub>4</sub> in HI.<ref name=figgins/> Polonium dihalides are formed by direct reaction of the elements or by reduction of PoCl<sub>4</sub> with SO<sub>2</sub> and with PoBr<sub>4</sub> with H<sub>2</sub>S at room temperature. Tetrahalides can be obtained by reacting polonium dioxide with HCl, HBr or HI.<ref name=g765>Greenwood, p. 765, 771, 775</ref>
 
 
Other polonium compounds include [[acetate]], [[bromate]], [[carbonate]], [[citrate]], [[chromate]], cyanide, [[formate]], hydroxide, [[nitrate]], selenate, monosulfide, [[sulfate]] and disulfate.<ref name=figgins>Figgins, P. E. (1961) [http://www.osti.gov/bridge/purl.cover.jsp?purl=/4034029-SolPsF/ The Radiochemistry of Polonium], National Academy of Sciences, US Atomic Energy Commission, pp. 13–14 [http://books.google.com/books?id=N0MrAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover Google Books]</ref><ref>Bagnall, pp. 212–226</ref>
 
   
 
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{|class="wikitable" style="text-align:center"
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|[[polonium dibromide|PoBr<sub>2</sub>]]||purple-brown|| 270 (dec.)|| || || || || || || || || || ||<ref name=PoBr>{{cite journal|doi=10.1039/JR9550003959|title=The polonium halides. Part II. Bromides|year=1955|last1=Bagnall|first1=K. W.|last2=d'Eye|first2=R. W. M.|last3=Freeman|first3=J. H.|journal=Journal of the Chemical Society (Resumed)|pages=3959}}</ref>
 
|[[polonium dibromide|PoBr<sub>2</sub>]]||purple-brown|| 270 (dec.)|| || || || || || || || || || ||<ref name=PoBr>{{cite journal|doi=10.1039/JR9550003959|title=The polonium halides. Part II. Bromides|year=1955|last1=Bagnall|first1=K. W.|last2=d'Eye|first2=R. W. M.|last3=Freeman|first3=J. H.|journal=Journal of the Chemical Society (Resumed)|pages=3959}}</ref>
 
|-
 
|-
|[[polonium tetrachloride|PoCl<sub>4</sub>]]|| yellow||300 || 200 ||[[monoclinic]] || || || || || || || || ||<ref name=PoCl/>
 
|-
 
|[[polonium tetrabromide|PoBr<sub>4</sub>]]|| red||330 (dec.) || ||[[face-centered cubic|fcc]] ||Fm{{overline|3}}m || cF100 ||225||560||560||560||4|| || <ref name=PoBr/>
 
|-
 
|[[polonium tetraiodide|PoI<sub>4</sub>]]||black || || || || || || || || || || || || <ref>{{cite journal|doi=10.1039/JR9560003385|title=657. The polonium halides. Part III. Polonium tetraiodide|year=1956|last1=Bagnall|first1=K. W.|last2=d'Eye|first2=R. W. M.|last3=Freeman|first3=J. H.|journal=Journal of the Chemical Society (Resumed)|pages=3385}}</ref>
 
|}
 
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'''Oxides'''
 
*[[Polonium monoxide|PoO]]
 
*[[Polonium dioxide|PoO<sub>2</sub>]]
 
*[[Polonium trioxide|PoO<sub>3</sub>]]
 
 
{{col-break}}
 
{{col-break}}
 
'''Hydrides'''
 
'''Hydrides'''
Reason: ANN scored at 0.907258
Reporter Information
Reporter: Mark (anonymous)
Date: Tuesday, the 9th of February 2016 at 11:12:23 PM
Status: Reported
Thursday, the 14th of February 2013 at 11:53:18 AM #91097
Anonymous (anonymous)

why?

Tuesday, the 9th of February 2016 at 11:12:23 PM #103220
Mark (anonymous)

moBVmS http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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