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ID: 1516083
User: 99.3.151.190
Article: High-fructose corn syrup
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bob
[[File:D-Fructose vs. D-Glucose Structural Formulae V.1.svg|thumb|Structural formulae of fructose (left) and glucose (right)]]
 
'''High-fructose corn syrup''' ('''HFCS''')—also called '''glucose/fructose''' in [[Canada]],<ref>Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada: [http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1172167862291&lang=eng The Canadian Soft Drink Industry] "Glucose/fructose is a generic term for high fructose corn syrup or HFCS". Retrieved November 5, 2009.</ref> '''glucose–fructose syrup''' (GFS) in the [[European Union|EU]],<ref>EUFIC: [http://www.eufic.org/page/en/page/FAQ/faqid/glucose-fructose-syrup/] "Glucose-Fructose Syrup is a liquid sweetener used in the manufacturing of foods and beverages."</ref><ref>[http://www.netmums.com/food/Food_Nasties_Watch_Out_.321/ Glucose fructose syrup: the crack of sweeteners] Netmums</ref> and '''high-fructose maize syrup''' in other countries—comprises any of a group of [[corn syrup]]s that has undergone [[enzymatic]] processing to convert some of its [[glucose]] into [[fructose]] to produce a desired [[sweetness]].
 
 
In the [[United States]], consumer foods and products typically use high-fructose corn syrup as a sweetener. It has become very common in processed foods and beverages in the U.S., including [[bread]]s, [[breakfast cereal|cereals]], [[breakfast bar]]s, [[cold cut|lunch meats]], [[yogurt]]s, [[soup]]s, and [[condiment]]s<!-- PLEASE DO NOT ADD MORE EXAMPLES HERE AS THIS IS A QUOTE FROM A 2009 SCHOLARLY SOURCE -->.<ref>{{Cite journal|url=http://www.iatp.org/files/421_2_105026.pdf |date = January 2009|title=Not So Sweet: Missing Mercury and High Fructose Corn Syrup |accessdate=2010-09-01 |author=David Wallinga, Janelle Sorensen, Pooja Mottl, Brian Yablon |publisher=[[Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy]] }}</ref>
 
 
 
HFCS consists of 24% water, and the rest [[sugar]]s. The most widely used varieties of high-fructose corn syrup are: HFCS 55 (mostly used in soft drinks), approximately 55% fructose and 42% glucose; and HFCS 42 (used in beverages, processed foods, cereals and baked goods), approximately 42% fructose and 53% glucose.<ref>University of Maryland press release [http://www.newsdesk.umd.edu/sociss/release.cfm?ArticleID=1470 UM. Study – Not Enough Evidence to Indict High Fructose Corn Syrup in Obesity]. Retrieved 2007-11-15.</ref><ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.ers.usda.gov/briefing/sugar/background.htm |title=ERS/USDA Briefing Room – Sugar and Sweeteners: Background |publisher=[[United States of Agriculture]] |date=updated August 6, 2009 |accessdate=November 18, 2011}}</ref> HFCS-90, approximately 90% fructose and 10% glucose, is used in small quantities for specialty applications, but primarily is used to blend with HFCS 42 to make HFCS 55.<ref>Article in Food Product Design by John S. White, Ph.D.[http://www.foodproductdesign.com/articles/2008/12/hfcs-how-sweet-it-is.aspx John S. White, Ph.D., December 2, 2008, HFCS: How Sweet It Is, Food Product Design]. Retrieved 2009-09-06.</ref>
 
HFCS consists of 24% water, and the rest [[sugar]]s. The most widely used varieties of high-fructose corn syrup are: HFCS 55 (mostly used in soft drinks), approximately 55% fructose and 42% glucose; and HFCS 42 (used in beverages, processed foods, cereals and baked goods), approximately 42% fructose and 53% glucose.<ref>University of Maryland press release [http://www.newsdesk.umd.edu/sociss/release.cfm?ArticleID=1470 UM. Study – Not Enough Evidence to Indict High Fructose Corn Syrup in Obesity]. Retrieved 2007-11-15.</ref><ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.ers.usda.gov/briefing/sugar/background.htm |title=ERS/USDA Briefing Room – Sugar and Sweeteners: Background |publisher=[[United States of Agriculture]] |date=updated August 6, 2009 |accessdate=November 18, 2011}}</ref> HFCS-90, approximately 90% fructose and 10% glucose, is used in small quantities for specialty applications, but primarily is used to blend with HFCS 42 to make HFCS 55.<ref>Article in Food Product Design by John S. White, Ph.D.[http://www.foodproductdesign.com/articles/2008/12/hfcs-how-sweet-it-is.aspx John S. White, Ph.D., December 2, 2008, HFCS: How Sweet It Is, Food Product Design]. Retrieved 2009-09-06.</ref>
   
Reason: ANN scored at 0.910912
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 04:20:52 PM
Status: Reported
Tuesday, the 19th of February 2013 at 07:37:48 PM #92507
bob10 (anonymous)

it helps

Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 04:20:52 PM #101557
Bradley (anonymous)

Gn3pk9 http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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