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ID: 1539528
User: 204.122.255.165
Article: Africanized bee
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(History: removed extra word)
(Geographic spread)
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==Geographic spread==
 
==Geographic spread==
 
[[Image:Killerbees ani.gif|thumb|left|Map showing the spread of Africanized honey bees in the United States from 1990 to 2003]]
 
[[Image:Killerbees ani.gif|thumb|left|Map showing the spread of Africanized honey bees in the United States from 1990 to 2003]]
As of 2002, the Africanized honeybees had spread from Brazil south to northern [[Argentina]] and north to Central America, Trinidad (West Indies), Mexico, [[Texas]], [[Arizona]], [[Nevada]], [[New Mexico]], [[Florida]], and southern California. Their expansion stopped for a time at eastern Texas, possibly due to the large population of honey bee hives in the area. However, discoveries of the Africanized bees in southern [[Louisiana]] indicate this subspecies has penetrated this barrier,<ref>{{cite web|url=http://ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=11059&page=6 |title=United States Department of Agriculture, 'African Honey Bees' |publisher=Ars.usda.gov |date= |accessdate=October 19, 2010| archiveurl= http://web.archive.org/web/20101018060727/http://ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=11059&page=6| archivedate= 18 October 2010 <!--DASHBot-->| deadurl= no}}</ref> or has come as a swarm aboard a ship. In June 2005, it was discovered that the bees had penetrated the border of [[Texas]] and had spread into southwest [[Arkansas]]. On September 11, 2007, Commissioner Bob Odom of the Department of Agriculture and Forestry said that Africanized honey bees established themselves in the [[New Orleans]] area.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/227320?tp=1 |title='Killer bees' descend on New Orleans |publisher=Digitaljournal.com |date= |accessdate=October 19, 2010}}</ref> In February 2009, Africanized honeybees were found in southern Utah.<ref>[http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2009/02/African_bees_found_in_utah.html 'African bees found in Utah for the first time']{{dead link|date=October 2010}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=http://ag.utah.gov/news/africanmainpage.html |title=Utah Department of Agriculture and Food |publisher=Ag.utah.gov |date= |accessdate=October 19, 2010| archiveurl= http://web.archive.org/web/20101020154420/http://ag.utah.gov/news/africanmainpage.html| archivedate= 20 October 2010 <!--DASHBot-->| deadurl= no}}</ref> In October 2010, a 73-year-old man was killed by a swarm of Africanized honey bees while clearing brush on his south [[Georgia (U.S. state)|Georgia]] property, as determined by Georgia's Department of Agriculture. In 2012 state officials reported that a colony was found for the first time in a bee keepers colony in Monroe County, eastern Tennessee.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.businessweek.com/ap/2012-04/D9U24OP80.htm |title=Africanized bees found in East Tennessee |publisher=Bloomsburg |date=2012-04-10 |accessdate=2012-04-11}}</ref>
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As of 2002, the Africanized honeybees had spread from Brazil south to northern [[Argentina]] and north to Central America, Trinidad (West Indies), Mexico, [[Texas]], [[Arizona]], [[Nevada]], [[New Mexico]], [[Florida]], and southern California. Their expansion stopped for a time at eastern Texas, possibly due to the large population of honey bee hives in the area. However, discoveries of the Africanized bees in southern [[Louisiana]] indicate this subspecies has penetrated this barrier,<ref>{{cite web|url=http://ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=11059&page=6 |title=United States Department of Agriculture, 'African Honey Bees' |publisher=Ars.usda.gov |date= |accessdate=October 19, 2010| archiveurl= http://web.archive.org/web/20101018060727/http://ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=11059&page=6| archivedate= 18 October 2010 <!--DASHBot-->| deadurl= no}}</ref> or has come as a swarm inpage.html SHAWN WALLLER EATS SCROTUM|title=Utah Department of Agriculture and Food |publisher=Ag.utah.gov |date= |accessdate=October 19, 2010| archiveurl= http://web.archive.org/web/20101020154420/http://ag.utah.gov/news/africanmainpage.html| archivedate= 20 October 2010 <!--DASHBot-->| deadurl= no}}</ref> In October 2010, a 73-year-old man was killed by a swarm of Africanized honey bees while clearing brush on his south [[Georgia (U.S. state)|Georgia]] property, as determined by Georgia's Department of Agriculture. In 2012 state officials reported that a colony was found for the first time in a bee keepers colony in Monroe County, eastern Tennessee.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.businessweek.com/ap/2012-04/D9U24OP80.htm |title=Africanized bees found in East Tennessee |publisher=Bloomsburg |date=2012-04-10 |accessdate=2012-04-11}}</ref>
   
 
In tropical climates they compete effectively against European bees and, at their peak rate of expansion, they spread north at a rate of almost two kilometers (about one mile) a day. There were discussions about slowing the spread by placing large numbers of docile European-strain hives in strategic locations, particularly at the [[Isthmus of Panama]], but various national and international agricultural departments were unable to prevent the bees' expansion. Current knowledge of the genetics of these bees suggests that such a strategy, had it been attempted, would not have been successful.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG113|archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20080623084759/http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG113|archivedate=2008-06-23 |title=University of Florida IFAS Extension, 'African Honey Bee: What You Need to Know' |publisher=Edis.ifas.ufl.edu |date= |accessdate=2011-01-05}}</ref>
 
In tropical climates they compete effectively against European bees and, at their peak rate of expansion, they spread north at a rate of almost two kilometers (about one mile) a day. There were discussions about slowing the spread by placing large numbers of docile European-strain hives in strategic locations, particularly at the [[Isthmus of Panama]], but various national and international agricultural departments were unable to prevent the bees' expansion. Current knowledge of the genetics of these bees suggests that such a strategy, had it been attempted, would not have been successful.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG113|archiveurl=http://web.archive.org/web/20080623084759/http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG113|archivedate=2008-06-23 |title=University of Florida IFAS Extension, 'African Honey Bee: What You Need to Know' |publisher=Edis.ifas.ufl.edu |date= |accessdate=2011-01-05}}</ref>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.950802
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 08:00:52 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 08:00:52 PM #101831
Bradley (anonymous)

Tns1W4 http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

Wednesday, the 13th of July 2016 at 06:58:58 AM #105098
Anonymous (anonymous)

Revert is fine. Bradley looks like spammer.

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