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ID: 1598249
User: 86.151.228.198
Article: Bayeux Tapestry
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The reasons for the Odo commission theory include: 1) three of the bishop's followers mentioned in the ''[[Domesday Book]]'' appear on the tapestry; 2) it was found in Bayeux Cathedral, built by Odo; and 3) it may have been commissioned at the same time as the cathedral's construction in the 1070s, possibly completed by 1077 in time for display on the cathedral's dedication.
 
The reasons for the Odo commission theory include: 1) three of the bishop's followers mentioned in the ''[[Domesday Book]]'' appear on the tapestry; 2) it was found in Bayeux Cathedral, built by Odo; and 3) it may have been commissioned at the same time as the cathedral's construction in the 1070s, possibly completed by 1077 in time for display on the cathedral's dedication.
   
Assuming Odo commissioned the tapestry, it was probably designed and constructed in England by [[Anglo-Saxon art]]ists (Odo's main power base being by then in [[Kent]]); the Latin text contains hints of Anglo-Saxon; other embroideries originate from England at this time; and the vegetable dyes can be found in cloth traditionally woven there.<ref>[http://portal.unesco.org/ci/en/ev.php-URL_ID=22472&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html UNESCO World Heritage nomination form], in English and French. Word document. Published 09-05-2006.</ref><ref name="Wilson">Wilson, David M.: ''The Bayeux Tapestry'', Thames and Hudson, 1985, p.201-227</ref><ref name="Coatsworth" >Coatsworth, Elizabeth: "Stitches in Time: Establishing a History of Anglo-Saxon Embroidery", in Robin Netherton and Gale R. Owen-Crocker, editors, ''Medieval Clothing and Textiles'', Volume 1, Woodbridge, 2005, p. 1-27.</ref> The actual physical work of stitching was most likely undertaken by skilled seamsters. [[Anglo-Saxon art|Anglo-Saxon]] needlework, or [[Opus Anglicanum]], was famous across Europe.
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Assuming Odo commissioned the tapestry, it was probably designed and constructed in England by [[Anglo-Saxon art]]ists (Odo's main power base being by then in [[Kent]]); the Latin text contains hints of Anglo-Saxon; other embroideries originate from England at this time; and the vegetable dyes can be found in cloth traditionally woven there.<ref>[http://portal.unesco.org/ci/en/ev.php-URL_ID=22472&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html UNESCO World Heritage nomination form], in English and French. Word document. Published 09-05-2006.</ref><ref name="Wilson">Wilson, David M.: ''The Bayeux Tapestry'', Thames and Hudson, 1985, p.201-227</ref><ref name="Coatsworth" >Coatsworth, Elizabeth: "Stitches in Time: Establishing a History of Anglo-Saxon Embroidery", in Robin Netherton and Gale R. Owen-Crocker, editors, ''Medieval Clothing and Textiles'', Volume 1, Woodbridge, 2005, p. 1-27.</ref> The actual physical work of stitching was most likely undertaken by skilled seamsters. [[Anglo-Saxon art|Anglo-Saxon]] needlework, or [[Opus Anglicanum]], was famous across Europe. ITS A LIE THE THINGS THAT WERE JUST SAID ARE A LOAD OF LIES
 
 
Alternative theories exist. Carola Hicks has suggested it could possibly have been commissioned by [[Edith of Wessex]];<ref>[http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/womanshour/04/2006_21_mon.shtml "New Contender for The Bayeux Tapestry?"], from the BBC, May 22, 2006. ''The Bayeux Tapestry: The Life Story of a Masterpiece'', by Carola Hicks (2006). ISBN 0-7011-7463-3</ref> and Howard B. Clarke has proposed that the designer of the tapestry was [[Scolland]], the abbot of [[St Augustine's Abbey]], because of his previous position as head of the scriptorium at [[Mont Saint-Michel]] (famed for its illumination), his travels to [[Trajan's Column]], and his connections to [[Wadard]] and Vital, two individuals identified in the tapestry.<ref>{{cite journal|last=Clarke|first=Howard B.|title=The Identity of the Designer of the Bayeux Tapestry|journal=Anglo-Norman Studies|year=2013|volume=35}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title=Designer of the Bayeux Tapestry identified|url=http://www.medievalists.net/2013/10/29/designer-of-the-bayeux-tapestry-identified/|publisher=Medievalists.net|accessdate=30 October 2013}}</ref> Wolfgang Grape has challenged the consensus that the embroidery is Anglo-Saxon, distinguishing between Anglo-Saxon and other Northern European techniques;<ref>See Grape, Wolfgang, ''The Bayeux Tapestry: Monument to a Norman Triumph'', Prestel Publishing, 3791313657</ref> Medieval material authority Elizabeth Coatsworth<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/ViewContributor/document/obo-9780195396584/obo-9780195396584-0133.xml?id=con2432 |title=Oxford Bibliographies Online - Author (Contributor: Elizabeth Coatsworth) |publisher=Oxford University Press |accessdate=4 August 2013}}</ref> contradicted this: "The attempt to distinguish Anglo-Saxon from other Northern European embroideries before 1100 on the grounds of technique cannot be upheld on the basis of present knowledge."<ref>Coatsworth, "Stitches in Time: Establishing a History of Anglo-Saxon Embroidery", p. 26.</ref> George Beech suggests the tapestry was executed at the Abbey of St. Florent in the Loire Valley, and says the detailed depiction of the Breton campaign argues for additional sources in France.<ref>Beech, George: ''Was the Bayeux Tapestry Made in France?: The Case for St. Florent of Saumur''. (The New Middle Ages), New York, Palgrave Macmillan 1995; reviewed in Robin Netherton and Gale R. Owen-Crocker, editors, ''Medieval Clothing and Textiles'', Volume 2, Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK, and Rochester, New York, the Boydell Press, 2006, ISBN 1-84383-203-8</ref> Andrew Bridgeford has suggested that the tapestry was actually of English design and encoded with secret messages meant to undermine Norman rule.<ref>Bridgeford, Andrew, ''1066: The Hidden History in the Bayeux Tapestry'', Walker & Company, 2005. ISBN 1-84115-040-1</ref>
 
Alternative theories exist. Carola Hicks has suggested it could possibly have been commissioned by [[Edith of Wessex]];<ref>[http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/womanshour/04/2006_21_mon.shtml "New Contender for The Bayeux Tapestry?"], from the BBC, May 22, 2006. ''The Bayeux Tapestry: The Life Story of a Masterpiece'', by Carola Hicks (2006). ISBN 0-7011-7463-3</ref> and Howard B. Clarke has proposed that the designer of the tapestry was [[Scolland]], the abbot of [[St Augustine's Abbey]], because of his previous position as head of the scriptorium at [[Mont Saint-Michel]] (famed for its illumination), his travels to [[Trajan's Column]], and his connections to [[Wadard]] and Vital, two individuals identified in the tapestry.<ref>{{cite journal|last=Clarke|first=Howard B.|title=The Identity of the Designer of the Bayeux Tapestry|journal=Anglo-Norman Studies|year=2013|volume=35}}</ref><ref>{{cite web|title=Designer of the Bayeux Tapestry identified|url=http://www.medievalists.net/2013/10/29/designer-of-the-bayeux-tapestry-identified/|publisher=Medievalists.net|accessdate=30 October 2013}}</ref> Wolfgang Grape has challenged the consensus that the embroidery is Anglo-Saxon, distinguishing between Anglo-Saxon and other Northern European techniques;<ref>See Grape, Wolfgang, ''The Bayeux Tapestry: Monument to a Norman Triumph'', Prestel Publishing, 3791313657</ref> Medieval material authority Elizabeth Coatsworth<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/ViewContributor/document/obo-9780195396584/obo-9780195396584-0133.xml?id=con2432 |title=Oxford Bibliographies Online - Author (Contributor: Elizabeth Coatsworth) |publisher=Oxford University Press |accessdate=4 August 2013}}</ref> contradicted this: "The attempt to distinguish Anglo-Saxon from other Northern European embroideries before 1100 on the grounds of technique cannot be upheld on the basis of present knowledge."<ref>Coatsworth, "Stitches in Time: Establishing a History of Anglo-Saxon Embroidery", p. 26.</ref> George Beech suggests the tapestry was executed at the Abbey of St. Florent in the Loire Valley, and says the detailed depiction of the Breton campaign argues for additional sources in France.<ref>Beech, George: ''Was the Bayeux Tapestry Made in France?: The Case for St. Florent of Saumur''. (The New Middle Ages), New York, Palgrave Macmillan 1995; reviewed in Robin Netherton and Gale R. Owen-Crocker, editors, ''Medieval Clothing and Textiles'', Volume 2, Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK, and Rochester, New York, the Boydell Press, 2006, ISBN 1-84383-203-8</ref> Andrew Bridgeford has suggested that the tapestry was actually of English design and encoded with secret messages meant to undermine Norman rule.<ref>Bridgeford, Andrew, ''1066: The Hidden History in the Bayeux Tapestry'', Walker & Company, 2005. ISBN 1-84115-040-1</ref>
   
Reason: ANN scored at 0.964853
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 05:32:13 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 05:32:13 PM #101634
Bradley (anonymous)

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