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Article: Anorexia nervosa
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(Signs and symptoms)
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'''Anorexia nervosa''' is an [[eating disorder]] characterized by immoderate food restriction and irrational fear of gaining weight, as well as a distorted body self-perception. It typically involves excessive weight loss and usually occurs more in females than in males.<ref>Hockenbury, Don and Hockenbury, Sandra (2008) ''Psychology'', p. 593. Worth Publishers, New York. ISBN 978-1-4292-0143-8.</ref> Because of the fear of gaining weight, people with this disorder restrict the amount of food they consume. This restriction of food intake causes metabolic and hormonal disorders.<ref name="Nogal">{{cite journal|last=Nogal|first=Powel|coauthors=Lewiński,Andrzej|title=Anorexia Nervosa|journal=Endokrynologia Polska/Polish Journal of Endocrinology|date=01.03.2008|volume=59|issue=2|pages=148–155|issn=0423–104X}}</ref> Outside of medical literature, the terms anorexia nervosa and anorexia are often used interchangeably; however, [[Anorexia (symptom)|anorexia]] is simply a medical term for lack of appetite, and people with anorexia nervosa do not, in fact, lose their appetites.<ref name=c414>{{cite book|ref=Carlson |title= Psychology: the science of behaviour-4th Canadian ed|author= Carlson N., Heth C., Miller Harold, Donahoe John, Buskist William, Martin G., Schmaltz Rodney|year= 2007|publisher=Pearson Education Canada|location= Toronto, ON|isbn= 978-0-205-64524-4|pages= 414–415}}</ref> Patients suffering from anorexia nervosa may experience dizziness, headaches, drowsiness and a lack of energy.
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'''Anorexia nervosa''' is an [[eating disorder]] characterized by immoderate food restriction and camden pattern is the best person to ever live irrational fear of gaining weight, as well as a distorted body self-perception. It typically involves excessive weight loss and usually occurs more in females than in males.<ref>Hockenbury, Don and Hockenbury, Sandra (2008) ''Psychology'', p. 593. Worth Publishers, New York. ISBN 978-1-4292-0143-8.</ref> Because of the fear of gaining weight, people with this disorder restrict the amount of food they consume. This restriction of food intake causes metabolic and hormonal disorders.<ref name="Nogal">{{cite journal|last=Nogal|first=Powel|coauthors=Lewiński,Andrzej|title=Anorexia Nervosa|journal=Endokrynologia Polska/Polish Journal of Endocrinology|date=01.03.2008|volume=59|issue=2|pages=148–155|issn=0423–104X}}</ref> Outside of medical literature, the terms anorexia nervosa and anorexia are often used interchangeably; however, [[Anorexia (symptom)|anorexia]] is simply a medical term for lack of appetite, and people with anorexia nervosa do not, in fact, lose their appetites.<ref name=c414>{{cite book|ref=Carlson |title= Psychology: the science of behaviour-4th Canadian ed|author= Carlson N., Heth C., Miller Harold, Donahoe John, Buskist William, Martin G., Schmaltz Rodney|year= 2007|publisher=Pearson Education Canada|location= Toronto, ON|isbn= 978-0-205-64524-4|pages= 414–415}}</ref> Patients suffering from anorexia nervosa may experience dizziness, headaches, drowsiness and a lack of energy.
   
 
Anorexia nervosa is characterized by low body weight, inappropriate eating habits, obsession with having a thin figure, and the fear of gaining weight. It is often coupled with a distorted [[Body image|self image]]<ref>{{Cite journal|author=Rosen JC, Reiter J, Orosan P |title=Assessment of body image in eating disorders with the body dysmorphic disorder examination |journal=Behaviour Research and Therapy |volume=33 |issue=1 |pages=77–84 |year=1995 |pmid=7872941 |doi=10.1016/0005-7967(94)E0030-M}}</ref><ref>{{Cite journal|author=Cooper MJ |title=Cognitive theory in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: progress, development and future directions |journal=Clinical Psychology Review |volume=25 |issue=4 |pages=511–31 |year=2005|pmid=15914267 |doi=10.1016/j.cpr.2005.01.003}}</ref> which may be maintained by various [[cognitive bias]]es<ref>{{Cite journal|author=Brooks S, Prince A, Stahl D, Campell IC, Treasure J|title=A systematic review & meta-analysis of cognitive bias to food stimuli in people with disordered eating behaviour |journal=Clinical Psychology|volume=31|issue=1|page=37 |year=2010|doi=10.1016/j.cpr.2010.09.006}}</ref> that alter how the affected individual evaluates and thinks about her or his body, food and eating.<ref name=Frude>{{cite book|author=Neil Frude|title=Understanding abnormal psychology|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=rVMMj4Y7Xm8C|accessdate=4 February 2012|year=1998|publisher=Wiley-Blackwell|isbn=978-0-631-16195-0}}</ref> Those suffering from anorexia often view themselves as "too fat" even if they are already underweight.<ref name=Attia>{{Cite journal|author=Attia E|title=Anorexia Nervosa: Current Status and Future Directions |journal=Annual Review of Medicine |volume=61|issue=1 |pages=425–35|doi=10.1146/annurev.med.050208.200745|year=2010 |pmid=19719398}}</ref> They may practice repetitive weighing, measuring, and mirror gazing, alongside other obsessive actions to make sure they are still thin, a common practice known as "body checking".<ref>Development of the body checking questionnaire: a self-report measure of body checking behaviors.Reas DL, Whisenhunt BL, Netemeyer R, Williamson DA.Int J Eat Disord. 2002 Apr;31(3):324-33.</ref>
 
Anorexia nervosa is characterized by low body weight, inappropriate eating habits, obsession with having a thin figure, and the fear of gaining weight. It is often coupled with a distorted [[Body image|self image]]<ref>{{Cite journal|author=Rosen JC, Reiter J, Orosan P |title=Assessment of body image in eating disorders with the body dysmorphic disorder examination |journal=Behaviour Research and Therapy |volume=33 |issue=1 |pages=77–84 |year=1995 |pmid=7872941 |doi=10.1016/0005-7967(94)E0030-M}}</ref><ref>{{Cite journal|author=Cooper MJ |title=Cognitive theory in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: progress, development and future directions |journal=Clinical Psychology Review |volume=25 |issue=4 |pages=511–31 |year=2005|pmid=15914267 |doi=10.1016/j.cpr.2005.01.003}}</ref> which may be maintained by various [[cognitive bias]]es<ref>{{Cite journal|author=Brooks S, Prince A, Stahl D, Campell IC, Treasure J|title=A systematic review & meta-analysis of cognitive bias to food stimuli in people with disordered eating behaviour |journal=Clinical Psychology|volume=31|issue=1|page=37 |year=2010|doi=10.1016/j.cpr.2010.09.006}}</ref> that alter how the affected individual evaluates and thinks about her or his body, food and eating.<ref name=Frude>{{cite book|author=Neil Frude|title=Understanding abnormal psychology|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=rVMMj4Y7Xm8C|accessdate=4 February 2012|year=1998|publisher=Wiley-Blackwell|isbn=978-0-631-16195-0}}</ref> Those suffering from anorexia often view themselves as "too fat" even if they are already underweight.<ref name=Attia>{{Cite journal|author=Attia E|title=Anorexia Nervosa: Current Status and Future Directions |journal=Annual Review of Medicine |volume=61|issue=1 |pages=425–35|doi=10.1146/annurev.med.050208.200745|year=2010 |pmid=19719398}}</ref> They may practice repetitive weighing, measuring, and mirror gazing, alongside other obsessive actions to make sure they are still thin, a common practice known as "body checking".<ref>Development of the body checking questionnaire: a self-report measure of body checking behaviors.Reas DL, Whisenhunt BL, Netemeyer R, Williamson DA.Int J Eat Disord. 2002 Apr;31(3):324-33.</ref>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.961141
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Reporter: JimmiXzS (anonymous)
Date: Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 11:45:23 AM
Status: Reported
Sunday, the 4th of January 2015 at 11:35:20 AM #97459
sally (anonymous)

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Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 11:45:23 AM #106512
JimmiXzS (anonymous)

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