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ID: 1644704
User: 199.254.165.165
Article: Underground Railroad
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[[Image:Harriet Tubman.jpg|thumb|''[[Harriet Tubman]]'' (photo H. B. Lindsley), c.&nbsp;1870. A worker on the Underground Railroad, Tubman made 13 trips to the South, helping to free over 70 people.<ref name="13–70">Larson, p. xvii.</ref>]]
 
[[Image:Harriet Tubman.jpg|thumb|''[[Harriet Tubman]]'' (photo H. B. Lindsley), c.&nbsp;1870. A worker on the Underground Railroad, Tubman made 13 trips to the South, helping to free over 70 people.<ref name="13–70">Larson, p. xvii.</ref>]]
 
{{Events leading to US Civil War}}
 
{{Events leading to US Civil War}}
The '''Underground Railroad''' was a network of secret routes and [[safe house]]s used by 19th-century [[African American|black]] [[Slavery in the United States|slaves]] in the United States to escape to [[free state (United States)|free states]] and [[Canada]] with the aid of [[Abolitionism in the United States|abolitionists]] and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.<ref>{{cite web|publisher=dictionary.com |quote={{-'}}A network of houses and other places abolitionists used to help slaves escape to freedom in the northern states or in Canada...' —American Heritage Dictionary|url=http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Underground%20Railroad |title=Underground Railroad |accessdate=July 17, 2011}}</ref> The term is also applied to the abolitionists, both black and white, free and enslaved, who aided the fugitives.<ref name="PBS">{{cite web |url=http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2944.html |publisher=Public Broadcasting Service|title=The Underground Railroad|accessdate=July 25, 2007}}</ref> Various other routes led to [[Mexico]] or overseas.<ref>[http://www.nps.gov/undergroundrr/purpose.htm "Purpose and Background"]. ''Taking the Train to Freedom''. [[National Park Service]]. Retrieved July 17, 2011</ref> While an "Underground Railroad" running south toward [[Spanish Florida|Florida]], then a [[Spanish Empire|Spanish]] possession, existed from the late 17th century until shortly after the [[American Revolution]],<ref>{{cite news|url=http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jiODwWs22MG9qBGQ_ZI9U-6W3s9g?docId=b67287f0636841dfbad57fb14222cd97 |title=For a century, Underground Railroad ran south |first=Bruce |last=Smith |agency=Associated Press |publisher=Google News |date=March 18, 2012 |accessdate=March 23, 2012}}</ref> the network now generally known as the Underground Railroad was formed in the early 19th century, and reached its height between 1850 and 1860.<ref name="afroamhistory">Vox, Lisa, [http://afroamhistory.about.com/od/slavery/a/How-Did-Slaves-Resist-Slavery.htm "How Did Slaves Resist Slavery?"], ''African-American History'', About.com, Retrieved July 17, 2011.</ref> One estimate suggests that by 1850, 100,000 slaves had escaped via the "Railroad".<ref name="afroamhistory" /> [[British North America]] (present-day Canada), where slavery was prohibited, was a popular destination, as its long border gave many points of access. More than 30,000 people were said to have escaped there via the network during its 20-year peak period,<ref name="CAN"/> although [[United States Census|U.S. Census]] figures account for only 6,000.<ref>[http://www.cdva.ca.gov/news/GV%202-2-07.pdf "From slavery to freedom"], ''The Grapevine'', pp. 3–5.</ref> Some fugitives' stories are documented in ''[[The Underground Railroad (book)|The Underground Railroad]]'' by [[William Still]].
 
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The '''Underground Railroad''' was a network of secret routes and [[safe house]]s used by 19th-century [[African American|black]] [[Slavery in the United States|slaves]] in the United States to escape to [[free state (United States)|free states]] and [[Canada]] with the aid of [[Abolitionism in the United States|abolitionists]] and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.<ref>{{cite web|publisher=dictionary.com |quote={{-'}}A network of houses and other crackers
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places abolitionists used to help slaves escape to freedom in the northern states or in Canada...' —American Heritage Dictionary|url=http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Underground%20Railroad |title=Underground Railroad |accessdate=July 17, 2011}}</ref> The term is also applied to the abolitionists, both black and white, free and enslaved, who aided the fugitives.<ref name="PBS">{{cite web |url=http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2944.html |publisher=Public Broadcasting Service|title=The Underground Railroad|accessdate=July 25, 2007}}</ref> Various other routes led to [[Mexico]] or overseas.<ref>[http://www.nps.gov/undergroundrr/purpose.htm "Purpose and Background"]. ''Taking the Train to Freedom''. [[National Park Service]]. Retrieved July 17, 2011</ref> While an "Underground Railroad" running south toward [[Spanish Florida|Florida]], then a [[Spanish Empire|Spanish]] possession, existed from the late 17th century until shortly after the [[American Revolution]],<ref>{{cite news|url=http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jiODwWs22MG9qBGQ_ZI9U-6W3s9g?docId=b67287f0636841dfbad57fb14222cd97 |title=For a century, Underground Railroad ran south |first=Bruce |last=Smith |agency=Associated Press |publisher=Google News |date=March 18, 2012 |accessdate=March 23, 2012}}</ref> the network now generally known as the Underground Railroad was formed in the early 19th century, and reached its height between 1850 and 1860.<ref name="afroamhistory">Vox, Lisa, [http://afroamhistory.about.com/od/slavery/a/How-Did-Slaves-Resist-Slavery.htm "How Did Slaves Resist Slavery?"], ''African-American History'', About.com, Retrieved July 17, 2011.</ref> One estimate suggests that by 1850, 100,000 slaves had escaped via the "Railroad".<ref name="afroamhistory" /> [[British North America]] (present-day Canada), where slavery was prohibited, was a popular destination, as its long border gave many points of access. More than 30,000 people were said to have escaped there via the network during its 20-year peak period,<ref name="CAN"/> although [[United States Census|U.S. Census]] figures account for only 6,000.<ref>[http://www.cdva.ca.gov/news/GV%202-2-07.pdf "From slavery to freedom"], ''The Grapevine'', pp. 3–5.</ref> Some fugitives' stories are documented in ''[[The Underground Railroad (book)|The Underground Railroad]]'' by [[William Still]].
   
 
==Political background==
 
==Political background==
Reason: ANN scored at 0.913278
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 05:49:26 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 05:49:26 PM #101655
Bradley (anonymous)

inr1PA http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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