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Article: Rice
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(Etymology)
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First used in English in the middle of the 13th century, the word "rice" derives from the [[Old French]] ''ris'', which comes from Italian ''riso'', in turn from the [[Latin]] ''oriza'', which derives from the Greek ὄρυζα (''oruza''). The Greek word is the source of all European words (cf. Welsh ''reis'', German ''Reis'', Lithuanian ''ryžiai'', Serbo-Croatian ''riža'', Polish ''ryż'', Dutch ''rijst'', Hungarian ''rizs'', Romanian ''orez'').<ref>[http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=rice rice], Online Etymology Dictionary</ref><ref>[http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/rice?rskey=2B5J5N&result=1#m_en_gb0709840 rice], Oxford Dictionaries</ref><ref>[http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057%3Aentry%3Do%29%2Fruza ὄρυζα], Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, ''A Greek-English Lexicon'', on Perseus</ref>
 
First used in English in the middle of the 13th century, the word "rice" derives from the [[Old French]] ''ris'', which comes from Italian ''riso'', in turn from the [[Latin]] ''oriza'', which derives from the Greek ὄρυζα (''oruza''). The Greek word is the source of all European words (cf. Welsh ''reis'', German ''Reis'', Lithuanian ''ryžiai'', Serbo-Croatian ''riža'', Polish ''ryż'', Dutch ''rijst'', Hungarian ''rizs'', Romanian ''orez'').<ref>[http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=rice rice], Online Etymology Dictionary</ref><ref>[http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/rice?rskey=2B5J5N&result=1#m_en_gb0709840 rice], Oxford Dictionaries</ref><ref>[http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057%3Aentry%3Do%29%2Fruza ὄρυζα], Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, ''A Greek-English Lexicon'', on Perseus</ref>
   
The origin of the Greek word is unclear. It is sometimes held to be from the Tamil word அரிசி (''arisi''), or rather Old Tamil ''arici''.<ref name=witzel>{{cite journal|last=Witzel|first=Michael|authorlink=Michael Witzel|title=Substrate Languages in Old Indo-Aryan|journal=Electronic Journal of Vedic Studies|year=1999|volume=5|issue=1|page=26|url=http://www.ejvs.laurasianacademy.com/ejvs0501/ejvs0501article.pdf}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal|last=Thorley|first=John|title=The development of trade between the Roman Empire and the East under Augustus|doi=10.1017/S001738350001706X|jstor=642851|journal=Greece & Rome|year=1969|volume=16|issue=2|page=222}}</ref> However, [[Bhadriraju Krishnamurti|Krishnamurti]]<ref>{{cite journal|author=Witzel, Michael |year=2009|volume= 34|issue= 6|pages= 829–833|doi=10.1007/s12038-009-0096-1|journal=Journal of Biosciences |url=http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci/dec2009/Witzel_fulltext |title=The linguistic history of some Indian domestic plants}}</ref> disagrees with the notion that Old Tamil ''arici'' is the source of the Greek term, and proposes that it was borrowed from descendants of [[Proto-Dravidian language|Proto-Dravidian]] *''wariñci'' instead. Mayrhofer<ref name=EWA>{{cite book|last=Mayrhofer|first=Manfred|title=Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Altindoarischen|volume=2|year=1996|publisher=Universitätsverlag Winter|location=Heidelberg|isbn=3-8253-4550-5|page=598|authorlink=Manfred Mayrhofer|language=German}}</ref> suggests that the immediate source of the Greek word is to be sought in Old Iranian words of the types *''vrīz-'' or *''vrinj-'', but these are ultimately traced back to Indo-Aryan (as in [[Sanskrit]] ''vrīhí-'') and subsequently to Dravidian by Witzel and others.
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The origin of the Greek word is unclear. It is sometimes held to be from the Tamil word அரிசி (''arisi''), or rather Old Tamil ''arici''.<ref name=witzel>{{cite journal|last=Witzel|first=Michael|authorlink=Michael Witzel|title=Substrate Languages in Old Indo-Aryan|journal=Electronic Journal of Vedic Studies|year=1999|volume=5|issue=1|page=26|url=http://www.ejvs.laurasianacademy.com/ejvs0501/ejvs0501article.pdf}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal|last=Thorley|first=John|title=The development of trade between the Roman Empire and the East under Augustus|doi=10.1017/S001738350001706X|jstor=642851|journal=Greece & Rome|year=1969|volume=16|issue=2|page=222}}</ref> However, [[Bhadriraju Krishnamurti|Krishnamurti]]<ref>{{cite journal|author=Witzel, Michael |year=2009|volume= 34|issue= 6|pages= 829–833|doi=10.1007/s12038-009-0096-1|journal=Journal of Biosciences |url=http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci/dec2009/Witzel_fulltext |title=The linguistic history of some Indian domestic plants}}</ref> disagrees with the notion that Old Tamil ''arici'' is the source of the Greek term, and proposes that it was borrowed from descendants of [[Proto-Dravidian language|Proto-Dravidian]] *''wariñci'' instead. Mayrhofer<ref name=EWA>{{cite book|last=Mayrhofer|first=Manfred|title=Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Altindoarischen|volume=2|year=1996|publisher=Universitätsverlag Winter|location=Heidelberg|isbn=3-8253-4550-5|page=598|authorlink=Manfred Mayrhofer|language=German}}</ref> suggests that the immediate source of the Greek word is to be sought in Old Iranian words of the types *''vrīz-'' or *''vrinj-'', but these are ultimately traced back to Indo-Aryan (as in [[Sanskrit]] ''vrīhí-'') and subsequently to Dravidian by Witzel and others.booobies
   
 
== Preparation as food ==<!-- This section is linked from [[Polished rice]] -->
 
== Preparation as food ==<!-- This section is linked from [[Polished rice]] -->
Reason: ANN scored at 0.967393
Reporter Information
Reporter: Mark (anonymous)
Date: Friday, the 5th of February 2016 at 07:44:38 PM
Status: Reported
Friday, the 5th of February 2016 at 07:44:38 PM #103169
Mark (anonymous)

mjPfzP http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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