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ID: 1684146
User: Jedalvey
Article: Aerogel
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Silica aerogel is the most common type of aerogel, and the most extensively studied and used. It is [[silica]]-based, derived from [[silica gel]]. The lowest-density silica nanofoam weighs 1,000&nbsp;g/m<sup>3</sup>,<ref name=terms>[http://web.archive.org/web/20050718075757/http://www.llnl.gov/IPandC/technology/profile/aerogel/Terms/index.php Aerogels Terms]. LLNL.gov</ref> which is the evacuated version of the record-aerogel of 1,900&nbsp;g/m<sup>3</sup>.<ref name="llnl03">{{cite web|url= http://www.llnl.gov/str/October03/NewsOctober03.html|title= Lab's aerogel sets world record|publisher= LLNL Science & Technology Review|date=October 2003}}</ref> The density of [[air]] is 1,200&nbsp;g/m<sup>3</sup> (at 20&nbsp;°C and 1&nbsp;atm).<ref http://pdg.lbl.gov/2007/reviews/atomicrpp.pdf>Groom, D.E. [http://pdg.lbl.gov/2007/reviews/atomicrpp.pdf Abridged from Atomic Nuclear Properties]. Particle Data Group: 2007.</ref> As of 2013, [[aerographene]] had a lower density at 160&nbsp;g/m<sup>3</sup>, or 0.13&nbsp;times the density of air at room temperature.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.zju.edu.cn/c165055/content_2285977.html|title=Ultra-light Aerogel Produced at a Zhejiang University Lab-Press Releases-Zhejiang University |publisher=Zju.edu.cn|date=19 March 2013 |accessdate=2013-06-12}}</ref>
 
Silica aerogel is the most common type of aerogel, and the most extensively studied and used. It is [[silica]]-based, derived from [[silica gel]]. The lowest-density silica nanofoam weighs 1,000&nbsp;g/m<sup>3</sup>,<ref name=terms>[http://web.archive.org/web/20050718075757/http://www.llnl.gov/IPandC/technology/profile/aerogel/Terms/index.php Aerogels Terms]. LLNL.gov</ref> which is the evacuated version of the record-aerogel of 1,900&nbsp;g/m<sup>3</sup>.<ref name="llnl03">{{cite web|url= http://www.llnl.gov/str/October03/NewsOctober03.html|title= Lab's aerogel sets world record|publisher= LLNL Science & Technology Review|date=October 2003}}</ref> The density of [[air]] is 1,200&nbsp;g/m<sup>3</sup> (at 20&nbsp;°C and 1&nbsp;atm).<ref http://pdg.lbl.gov/2007/reviews/atomicrpp.pdf>Groom, D.E. [http://pdg.lbl.gov/2007/reviews/atomicrpp.pdf Abridged from Atomic Nuclear Properties]. Particle Data Group: 2007.</ref> As of 2013, [[aerographene]] had a lower density at 160&nbsp;g/m<sup>3</sup>, or 0.13&nbsp;times the density of air at room temperature.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.zju.edu.cn/c165055/content_2285977.html|title=Ultra-light Aerogel Produced at a Zhejiang University Lab-Press Releases-Zhejiang University |publisher=Zju.edu.cn|date=19 March 2013 |accessdate=2013-06-12}}</ref>
   
It has remarkable thermal insulative properties, having an extremely low [[thermal conductivity]]: from 0.03&nbsp;[[watt|W]]/m·[[kelvin|K]]<ref>"Thermal conductivity" in {{RubberBible86th}}. section 12, p. 227</ref> down to 0.004&nbsp;W/m·K,<ref name=terms/> which correspond to [[R-value (insulation)|R-values]] of 14 to 105 (US customary) or 3.0 to 22.2 (metric) for {{convert|3.5|in|mm|abbr=on|0}} thickness. For comparison, typical wall insulation is 13 (US Customary) or 2.7 (metric) for the same thickness. Its [[melting point]] is {{convert|1473|K|C F|abbr=on|0}}.
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It has remarkable thermal insulative properties, having an extremely low [[thermal conductivity]]: from 0.03&nbsp;[[watt|W]]/m·[[kelvin|K]]<ref>"Thermal conductivity" in {{RubberBible86th}}. section 12, p. 227</ref> in atmospheric pressure down to 0.004&nbsp;W/m·K<ref name=terms/> in modest vacuum, which correspond to [[R-value (insulation)|R-values]] of 14 to 105 (US customary) or 3.0 to 22.2 (metric) for {{convert|3.5|in|mm|abbr=on|0}} thickness. For comparison, typical wall insulation is 13 (US Customary) or 2.7 (metric) for the same thickness. Its [[melting point]] is {{convert|1473|K|C F|abbr=on|0}}.
   
 
Until 2011, silica aerogel held 15&nbsp;entries in ''[[Guinness World Records]]'' for material properties, including best insulator and lowest-density solid, though it was ousted from the latter title by the even lighter materials [[aerographite]] in 2012<ref>{{cite journal|last=Mecklenburg|first=Matthias|coauthors=Arnim Schuchardt, Yogendra Kumar Mishra, Sören Kaps, Rainer Adelung, Andriy Lotnyk, Lorenz Kienle, Karl Schulte|title=Aerographite: Ultra Lightweight, Flexible Nanowall, Carbon Microtube Material with Outstanding Mechanical Performance|journal=Advanced Materials|date=July 2012|volume=24|issue=26|doi=10.1002/adma.201200491}}</ref> and then [[graphene]] aerogel in 2013.<ref>Whitwam, Ryan (26 March 2013). [http://www.geek.com/articles/chips/graphene-aerogel-is-worlds-lightest-material-20130326/ Graphene aerogel is world’s lightest material]. gizmag.com</ref><ref>Quick, Darren (24 March 2013). [http://www.gizmag.com/graphene-aerogel-worlds-lightest/26784/ Graphene aerogel takes world’s lightest material crown]. gizmag.com</ref>
 
Until 2011, silica aerogel held 15&nbsp;entries in ''[[Guinness World Records]]'' for material properties, including best insulator and lowest-density solid, though it was ousted from the latter title by the even lighter materials [[aerographite]] in 2012<ref>{{cite journal|last=Mecklenburg|first=Matthias|coauthors=Arnim Schuchardt, Yogendra Kumar Mishra, Sören Kaps, Rainer Adelung, Andriy Lotnyk, Lorenz Kienle, Karl Schulte|title=Aerographite: Ultra Lightweight, Flexible Nanowall, Carbon Microtube Material with Outstanding Mechanical Performance|journal=Advanced Materials|date=July 2012|volume=24|issue=26|doi=10.1002/adma.201200491}}</ref> and then [[graphene]] aerogel in 2013.<ref>Whitwam, Ryan (26 March 2013). [http://www.geek.com/articles/chips/graphene-aerogel-is-worlds-lightest-material-20130326/ Graphene aerogel is world’s lightest material]. gizmag.com</ref><ref>Quick, Darren (24 March 2013). [http://www.gizmag.com/graphene-aerogel-worlds-lightest/26784/ Graphene aerogel takes world’s lightest material crown]. gizmag.com</ref>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.860837
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 10:37:13 PM
Status: Reported
Tuesday, the 4th of February 2014 at 10:34:55 AM #93409
Jedalvey (anonymous)

Added minor changes to clarify reported values.

Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 10:37:13 PM #101839
Bradley (anonymous)

Iml6Df http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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