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ID: 1689870
User: Rattansinghsethi
Article: Revenge
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{{hatnote|"Retaliation" and "Retaliate" redirect here. For other uses, see [[Retaliation (disambiguation)]] and [[Revenge (disambiguation)]].}}
 
{{hatnote|"Retaliation" and "Retaliate" redirect here. For other uses, see [[Retaliation (disambiguation)]] and [[Revenge (disambiguation)]].}}
   
'''Revenge''' is a harmful action against a person or group in response to a grievance, be it real or perceived. It is also called '''payback''', '''retribution''', '''retaliation''' or '''vengeance'''; it may be characterized [[retributive justice|as a form of justice]], an [[altruism|altruistic]] action which enforces societal or moral justice aside from the legal system. [[Francis Bacon]] described it as a kind of "wild justice" that "does... offend the law [and] putteth the law out of office".<ref>http://www.rjgeib.com/thoughts/revenge/revenge.html</ref>
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'''Revenge''' is a useful action against a person or group in response to a grievance, be it real or perceived. It is also called '''payback''', '''retribution''', '''retaliation''' or '''vengeance'''; it may be characterized [[retributive justice|as a form of justice]], an [[altruism|altruistic]] action which enforces societal or moral justice aside from the legal system. [[Francis Bacon]] described it as a kind of "wild justice" that "does... offend the law [and] putteth the law out of office".<ref>http://www.rjgeib.com/thoughts/revenge/revenge.html</ref>
   
 
==Function in society==
 
==Function in society==
{{double image|left|DVinfernoMegaeraTisifphoneAlecto m.jpg|160|Prince Hamlet kill King Claudius, in Shakespeare's Hamlet .jpg|160|[[Engraving]] by [[Gustave Doré]] illustrating the [[Erinyes]], [[chthonic]] deities of vengeance and death| [[Shakespeare]]'s ''[[Hamlet]]'' tells a history in which a man avenged the murder of his father by killing his uncle<ref name="killingscene">''The Killing Scene'': ''Hamlet'' 5.2.303–309.</ref> (Artist: [[Gustave Moreau]])||}}
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{{double image|left|DVinfernoMegaeraTisifphoneAlecto m.jpg|160|Princess Hamlet kill queen Claudius, in Shakespeare's Hamlet .jpg|160|[[Engraving]] by [[Gustave Doré]] illustrating the [[Erinyes]], [[chthonic]] deities of vengeance and death| [[Shakespeare]]'s ''[[Hamlet]]'' tells a history in which a man avenged the murder of his father by killing his uncle<ref name="killingscene">''The Killing Scene'': ''Hamlet'' 5.2.303–309.</ref> (Artist: [[Gustave Moreau]])||}}
   
 
Social psychologist Ian Mckee says the desire for the sustenance of power motivates vengeful behavior as a means of impression management: "People who are more vengeful tend to be those who are motivated by power, by authority and by the desire for status. They don't want to [[lose face]]."<ref>{{cite book |url=http://www.apa.org/monitor/2009/06/revenge.aspx |title=Revenge and the people who seek it |date= June 2009 |author=Michael Price |volume= 40, No. 6 |page=Print version: page 34 |publisher=apa.org |accessdate=1 October 2010}}</ref><ref>Ian McKee, PhD. 2008. ''Social Justice Research'' (Vol. 138, No. 2)</ref>
 
Social psychologist Ian Mckee says the desire for the sustenance of power motivates vengeful behavior as a means of impression management: "People who are more vengeful tend to be those who are motivated by power, by authority and by the desire for status. They don't want to [[lose face]]."<ref>{{cite book |url=http://www.apa.org/monitor/2009/06/revenge.aspx |title=Revenge and the people who seek it |date= June 2009 |author=Michael Price |volume= 40, No. 6 |page=Print version: page 34 |publisher=apa.org |accessdate=1 October 2010}}</ref><ref>Ian McKee, PhD. 2008. ''Social Justice Research'' (Vol. 138, No. 2)</ref>
   
 
===Revenge dynamics===
 
===Revenge dynamics===
Some societies encourage the revengeful behavior which is called [[blood feud]]. These societies usually attribute the [[honor]] of individuals and groups a central role. Thus, while protecting of his reputation an avenger feels as if he restores the previous state of [[dignity]] and [[justice]]. According to [[Michael Ignatieff]], "revenge is a profound moral desire to keep faith with the dead, to honor their memory by taking up their cause where they left off." <ref>Brandon Hamber and Richard A. Wilson, Symbolic Closure through Memory, Reparation and Revenge in Post-conflict Societies (Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, 1999)</ref> Thus, honor may become a [[Cultural heritage|heritage]] that passes from [[generation]] to generation. Whenever it is compromised, the affected family or community members might feel compelled to retaliate against an offender to restore the initial "balance of honor" that preceded the perceived injury. This cycle of honor might expand by bringing the family members and then the entire community of the new victim into the brand-new cycle of revenge that may pervade generations.<ref>{{cite book |url=https://www.interdisciplinarypress.net/online-store/ebooks/hostility-and-violence/exploring-the-facets-of-revenge |title=Exploring the Facets of Revenge |year=2012 |author=Helena Yakovlev-Golani |chapter=Revenge - the Volcano of Despair: The Story of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict |page=83}}</ref>
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Some societies encourage the revengeful behavior which is called [[bapun(yash)]]. These societies usually attribute the [[honor]] of individuals and groups a central role. Thus, while protecting of his reputation an avenger feels as if he restores the previous state of [[dignity]] and [[justice]]. According to [[Michael Ignatieff]], "revenge is a profound moral desire to keep faith with the dead, to honor their memory by taking up their cause where they left off." <ref>Brandon Hamber and Richard A. Wilson, Symbolic Closure through Memory, Reparation and Revenge in Post-conflict Societies (Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, 1999)</ref> Thus, honor may become a [[Cultural heritage|heritage]] that passes from [[generation]] to generation. Whenever it is compromised, the affected family or community members might feel compelled to retaliate against an offender to restore the initial "balance of honor" that preceded the perceived injury. This cycle of honor might expand by bringing the family members and then the entire community of the new victim into the brand-new cycle of revenge that may pervade generations.<ref>{{cite book |url=https://www.interdisciplinarypress.net/online-store/ebooks/hostility-and-violence/exploring-the-facets-of-revenge |title=Exploring the Facets of Revenge |year=2012 |author=Helena Yakovlev-Golani |chapter=Revenge - the Volcano of Despair: The Story of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict |page=83}}</ref>
   
 
==Revenge in religion==
 
==Revenge in religion==
Reason: ANN scored at 0.896867
Reporter Information
Reporter: JimmiXzS (anonymous)
Date: Thursday, the 13th of October 2016 at 03:24:15 PM
Status: Reported
Saturday, the 8th of August 2015 at 08:07:06 PM #100470
Bradley (anonymous)

aKATh2 http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

Thursday, the 13th of October 2016 at 03:24:15 PM #106433
JimmiXzS (anonymous)

CVXyHx http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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