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ID: 1692005
User: FrankBenj30
Article: Chelation therapy
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Since the 1970s, iron chelation therapy has been used as an alternative to regular [[Bloodletting|phlebotomy]] to treat excess iron stores in people with [[haemochromatosis]].<ref name='CDC_Hemo'>{{cite web|url=http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemochromatosis/training/treatment/monitoring_treatment.htm |title=Hemochromatosis for healthcare professionals |chapter= Treatment & Management: Monitoring Treatment |accessdate=29 March 2008 |date= 1 November 2007 |publisher= Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, [[Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]], [[United States Department of Health and Human Services|U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services]] |archiveurl = http://web.archive.org/web/20080224192906/http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemochromatosis/training/treatment/monitoring_treatment.htm <!-- Bot retrieved archive --> |archivedate = 2008-02-24}}</ref>
 
Since the 1970s, iron chelation therapy has been used as an alternative to regular [[Bloodletting|phlebotomy]] to treat excess iron stores in people with [[haemochromatosis]].<ref name='CDC_Hemo'>{{cite web|url=http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemochromatosis/training/treatment/monitoring_treatment.htm |title=Hemochromatosis for healthcare professionals |chapter= Treatment & Management: Monitoring Treatment |accessdate=29 March 2008 |date= 1 November 2007 |publisher= Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, [[Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]], [[United States Department of Health and Human Services|U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services]] |archiveurl = http://web.archive.org/web/20080224192906/http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemochromatosis/training/treatment/monitoring_treatment.htm <!-- Bot retrieved archive --> |archivedate = 2008-02-24}}</ref>
   
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Disodium EDTA was first used in 1956 to treat coronary disease, and has remained controversial to date.<ref name="pmid13228424">{{cite journal| author=CLARKE NE, CLARKE CN, MOSHER RE| title=The in vivo dissolution of metastatic calcium; an approach to atherosclerosis. | journal=Am J Med Sci | year= 1955 | volume= 229 | issue= 2 | pages= 142-9 | pmid=13228424 | doi= | pmc= | url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/elink.fcgi?dbfrom=pubmed&tool=sumsearch.org/cite&retmode=ref&cmd=prlinks&id=13228424 }} </ref><ref name="pmid13372537">{{cite journal| author=CLARKE CN, CLARKE NE, MOSHER RE| title=Treatment of angina pectoris with disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. | journal=Am J Med Sci | year= 1956 | volume= 232 | issue= 6 | pages= 654-66 | pmid=13372537 | doi= | pmc= | url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/elink.fcgi?dbfrom=pubmed&tool=sumsearch.org/cite&retmode=ref&cmd=prlinks&id=13372537 }} </ref> Its use has been restricted primarily to alternative medicine chelation practitioners. In 1998, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) pursued the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM), an organization that promotes "complementary, alternative and integrative medicine" over the claims made regarding the treatment of atherosclerosis in advertisements for EDTA chelation therapy. The FTC concluded that there was a lack of scientific studies to support these claims and that the statements by the ACAM were false. In 1999, the ACAM agreed to stop presenting chelation therapy as effective in treating heart disease, avoiding legal proceedings. In 2010 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned companies who sold over-the-counter (OTC) chelation products and stated that such "products are unapproved drugs and devices and that it is a violation of federal law to make unproven claims about these products. There are no FDA-approved OTC chelation products."
Other chelating agents have been discovered. They all function by making several chemical bonds with metal ions, thus rendering them much less chemically reactive. The resulting complex is water-soluble, allowing it to enter the bloodstream and be excreted harmlessly.{{Citation needed|reason=Substantial claim requires MEDRS|date=January 2014}}
 
   
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Interestingly, in 2001, in the midst of the unresolved controversy on EDTA chelation therapy use by alternative medicine practitioners, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute released an RFA (RFA 01-004, April 2001) for a definitive trial of chelation therapy for patients with atherosclerotic coronary disease – not metal intoxication. The grant was ultimately awarded in 2002 (U01 HL92607 from the NHLBI and NCCAM), the results are available in detail.<ref name="pmid23532240">{{cite journal| author=Lamas GA, Goertz C, Boineau R, Mark DB, Rozema T, Nahin RL et al.| title=Effect of disodium EDTA chelation regimen on cardiovascular events in patients with previous myocardial infarction: the TACT randomized trial. | journal=JAMA | year= 2013 | volume= 309 | issue= 12 | pages= 1241-50 | pmid=23532240 | doi=10.1001/jama.2013.2107 | pmc= | url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/elink.fcgi?dbfrom=pubmed&tool=sumsearch.org/cite&retmode=ref&cmd=prlinks&id=23532240 }} </ref><ref name="pmid24254885">{{cite journal| author=Escolar E, Lamas GA, Mark DB, Boineau R, Goertz C, Rosenberg Y et al.| title=The Effect of an EDTA-based Chelation Regimen on Patients With Diabetes Mellitus and Prior Myocardial Infarction in the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT). | journal=Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes | year= 2014 | volume= 7 | issue= 1 | pages= 15-24 | pmid=24254885 | doi=10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.113.000663 | pmc= | url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/eutils/elink.fcgi?dbfrom=pubmed&tool=sumsearch.org/cite&retmode=ref&cmd=prlinks&id=24254885 }} </ref>
Calcium-disodium EDTA chelation has been studied by the U.S. [[National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine]] for treating coronary disease.<ref name=NCCAMQA>{{cite web | url=http://nccam.nih.gov/news/2002/chelation/q-and-a.htm|publisher=[[National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine]] (NCCAM), [[National Institutes of Health]], [[United States Department of Health and Human Services|U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services]] | title=Questions and Answers: The NIH Trial of EDTA Chelation Therapy for Coronary Artery Disease |issue= NCCAM Pub. No. D166 |date= March 2007 | accessdate=11 November 2007 |archiveurl = http://web.archive.org/web/20071015044954/http://nccam.nih.gov/news/2002/chelation/q-and-a.htm <!-- Bot retrieved archive --> |archivedate = 2007-10-15}}</ref> In 1998, the U.S. [[Federal Trade Commission]] (FTC) pursued the [[American College for Advancement in Medicine]] (ACAM), an organization that promotes "complementary, alternative and integrative medicine" over the claims made regarding the treatment of [[atherosclerosis]] in advertisements for EDTA chelation therapy. The FTC concluded that there was a lack of scientific studies to support these claims and that the statements by the ACAM were false.<ref name= "FTC ACAM timeline">{{cite web | url = http://www.ftc.gov/os/1999/07/9623147c3881acamcmp.htm | title = American College for Advancement in Medicine: Case Timeline |volume= FTC Matter/File Number: 962 3147 |issue= Docket Number:C-3882 | publisher = [[Federal Trade Commission]] (FTC) | date = 13 July 1999 | accessdate = 1 July 2010 |type= FTC Case Timeline with links to documents }}</ref> In 1999, the ACAM agreed to stop presenting chelation therapy as effective in treating heart disease, avoiding legal proceedings.<ref>{{cite web | url = http://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/cases/1998/12/9623147agr.htm | title = United States of America Federal Trade Commission In the Matter of American College for Advancement in Medicine, a corporation. File no. 962 3147. '''Agreement Containing Consent Order''' | publisher = [[Federal Trade Commission]] | date = 12 January 1998 | accessdate = 1 July 2010}} {{cite web |url= http://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/cases/1998/12/9623147att.htm |title= Attachment A |type= Notification letter}}</ref> In 2010 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned companies who sold over-the-counter (OTC) chelation products and stated that such "products are unapproved drugs and devices and that it is a violation of federal law to make unproven claims about these products. There are no FDA-approved OTC chelation products."<ref name=FDA_2010_warning/>
 
   
 
== Approved medical use ==
 
== Approved medical use ==
Reason: ANN scored at 0.925752
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Reporter: oakley outlet (anonymous)
Date: Sunday, the 18th of October 2015 at 03:44:59 AM
Status: Reported
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