ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Viewing 1701133

Navigation

ID: 1701133
User: 204.185.229.253
Article: History of Greece
Diff:
(Undid revision 594119702 by 68.47.31.79 (talk) unconstructive edits)
(World War II)
Line 228: Line 228:
 
The war was concluded by the [[Treaty of Lausanne]], according to which there was to be a [[population exchange between Greece and Turkey]] on the basis of religion. Over one million Orthodox Christians left Turkey in exchange for 400,000 Muslims from Greece.<ref name="Clogg"/> The events of 1919–1922 are regarded in Greece as a particularly calamitous period of history. Between 1914 and 1923, and estimated 750,000<ref name=" Jones, Adam 2010 150-151 ">{{cite book| author= Jones, Adam |title=Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction |publisher=Taylor & Francis |year=2010 |pages=150–151 |isbn=0415486181 |quote= By the beginning of the First World War, a majority of the region’s ethnic Greeks still lived in present-day Turkey, mostly in Thrace (the only remaining Ottoman territory in Europe, abutting the Greek border), and along the Aegean and Black Sea coasts. They would be targeted both prior to and alongside the Armenians of Anatolia and Assyrians of Anatolia and Mesopotamia...The major populations of “Anatolian Greeks” include those along the Aegean coast and in Cappadocia (central Anatolia), but not the Greeks of the Thrace region west of the Bosphorus...A “Christian genocide” framing acknowledges the historic claims of Assyrian and Greek peoples, and the movements now stirring for recognition and restitution among Greek and Assyrian diasporas. It also brings to light the quite staggering cumulative death toll among the various Christian groups targeted...of the 1.5 million Greeks of Asia minor – Ionians, Pontians, and Cappadocians – approximately 750,000 were massacred and 750,000 exiled. Pontian deaths alone totaled 353,000. }}</ref> to 900,000<ref name=" Jones, Adam 2010 166 ">{{cite book |author= Jones, Adam |title=Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction |publisher=Taylor & Francis |year=2010 |page=166 |isbn=<!--0415486181, -->9780415486187 |quote= An estimate of the Pontian Greek death toll at all stages of the anti-Christian genocide is about 350,000; for all the Greeks of the Ottoman realm taken together, the toll surely exceeded half a million, and may approach the 900,000 killed that a team of US researchers found in the early postwar period. Most surviving Greeks were expelled to Greece as part of the tumultuous “population exchanges” that set the seal on a heavily “Turkified” state. }}</ref> Greeks died at the hands of the Ottoman Turks, in what many scholars have termed a [[Greek genocide|genocide]].<ref name="Jones2010">{{cite book|author=Adam Jones|title=Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=BqdVudSuTRIC&pg=PA172|accessdate=27 September 2012|date=26 October 2010|publisher=Taylor & Francis|isbn=978-0-415-48618-7|pages=171–172|quote= A resolution was placed before the IAGS membership to recognize the Greek and Assyrian/Chaldean components of the Ottoman genocide against Christians, alongside the Armenian strand of the genocide (which the IAGS has already formally acknowledged). The result, passed emphatically in December 2007 despite not inconsiderable opposition, was a resolution which I co-drafted, reading as follows:... (IAGS resolution is on page 172)}}</ref><ref>{{citation | publisher = International Association of Genocide Scholars | format = [[PDF]] | url = http://web.archive.org/web/20080428051032/http://genocidescholars.org/images/Resolution_on_genocides_committed_by_the_Ottoman_Empire.pdf| title = IAGS Resolution on Genocides committed by the Ottoman Empire retrieved via the Internet Archive}}</ref><ref>[http://news.am/eng/news/16644.html Genocide Resolution approved by Swedish Parliament — full text containing the IAGS resolution and the Swedish Parliament resolution from news.am]</ref><ref>Gaunt, David. ''[http://books.google.se/books?id=4mug9LrpLKcC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Massacres,+Resistance,+Protectors&cd=1#v=onepage&q=&f=false Massacres, Resistance, Protectors: Muslim-Christian Relations in Eastern Anatolia during World War I]''. Piscataway, New Jersey: Gorgias Press, 2006.</ref><ref>{{Cite journal | doi = 10.1080/14623520801950820 | last1 = Schaller | first1 = Dominik J | last2 = Zimmerer | first2 = Jürgen | year = 2008 | title = Late Ottoman genocides: the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire and Young Turkish population and extermination policies&nbsp;– introduction | url = | journal = Journal of Genocide Research | volume = 10 | issue = 1| pages = 7–14 }}</ref>
 
The war was concluded by the [[Treaty of Lausanne]], according to which there was to be a [[population exchange between Greece and Turkey]] on the basis of religion. Over one million Orthodox Christians left Turkey in exchange for 400,000 Muslims from Greece.<ref name="Clogg"/> The events of 1919–1922 are regarded in Greece as a particularly calamitous period of history. Between 1914 and 1923, and estimated 750,000<ref name=" Jones, Adam 2010 150-151 ">{{cite book| author= Jones, Adam |title=Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction |publisher=Taylor & Francis |year=2010 |pages=150–151 |isbn=0415486181 |quote= By the beginning of the First World War, a majority of the region’s ethnic Greeks still lived in present-day Turkey, mostly in Thrace (the only remaining Ottoman territory in Europe, abutting the Greek border), and along the Aegean and Black Sea coasts. They would be targeted both prior to and alongside the Armenians of Anatolia and Assyrians of Anatolia and Mesopotamia...The major populations of “Anatolian Greeks” include those along the Aegean coast and in Cappadocia (central Anatolia), but not the Greeks of the Thrace region west of the Bosphorus...A “Christian genocide” framing acknowledges the historic claims of Assyrian and Greek peoples, and the movements now stirring for recognition and restitution among Greek and Assyrian diasporas. It also brings to light the quite staggering cumulative death toll among the various Christian groups targeted...of the 1.5 million Greeks of Asia minor – Ionians, Pontians, and Cappadocians – approximately 750,000 were massacred and 750,000 exiled. Pontian deaths alone totaled 353,000. }}</ref> to 900,000<ref name=" Jones, Adam 2010 166 ">{{cite book |author= Jones, Adam |title=Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction |publisher=Taylor & Francis |year=2010 |page=166 |isbn=<!--0415486181, -->9780415486187 |quote= An estimate of the Pontian Greek death toll at all stages of the anti-Christian genocide is about 350,000; for all the Greeks of the Ottoman realm taken together, the toll surely exceeded half a million, and may approach the 900,000 killed that a team of US researchers found in the early postwar period. Most surviving Greeks were expelled to Greece as part of the tumultuous “population exchanges” that set the seal on a heavily “Turkified” state. }}</ref> Greeks died at the hands of the Ottoman Turks, in what many scholars have termed a [[Greek genocide|genocide]].<ref name="Jones2010">{{cite book|author=Adam Jones|title=Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=BqdVudSuTRIC&pg=PA172|accessdate=27 September 2012|date=26 October 2010|publisher=Taylor & Francis|isbn=978-0-415-48618-7|pages=171–172|quote= A resolution was placed before the IAGS membership to recognize the Greek and Assyrian/Chaldean components of the Ottoman genocide against Christians, alongside the Armenian strand of the genocide (which the IAGS has already formally acknowledged). The result, passed emphatically in December 2007 despite not inconsiderable opposition, was a resolution which I co-drafted, reading as follows:... (IAGS resolution is on page 172)}}</ref><ref>{{citation | publisher = International Association of Genocide Scholars | format = [[PDF]] | url = http://web.archive.org/web/20080428051032/http://genocidescholars.org/images/Resolution_on_genocides_committed_by_the_Ottoman_Empire.pdf| title = IAGS Resolution on Genocides committed by the Ottoman Empire retrieved via the Internet Archive}}</ref><ref>[http://news.am/eng/news/16644.html Genocide Resolution approved by Swedish Parliament — full text containing the IAGS resolution and the Swedish Parliament resolution from news.am]</ref><ref>Gaunt, David. ''[http://books.google.se/books?id=4mug9LrpLKcC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Massacres,+Resistance,+Protectors&cd=1#v=onepage&q=&f=false Massacres, Resistance, Protectors: Muslim-Christian Relations in Eastern Anatolia during World War I]''. Piscataway, New Jersey: Gorgias Press, 2006.</ref><ref>{{Cite journal | doi = 10.1080/14623520801950820 | last1 = Schaller | first1 = Dominik J | last2 = Zimmerer | first2 = Jürgen | year = 2008 | title = Late Ottoman genocides: the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire and Young Turkish population and extermination policies&nbsp;– introduction | url = | journal = Journal of Genocide Research | volume = 10 | issue = 1| pages = 7–14 }}</ref>
   
===World War II===
+
===World War II===potato is good hai hai hai hai
[[File:Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-163-0319-07A, Griechenland, Artilleriestellung auf freiem Feld.jpg|thumb|German artillery shelling the [[Metaxas Line]].]]
 
 
Despite the country's numerically small and ill-equipped armed forces, Greece made a decisive contribution to the [[Allies of World War II|Allied]] efforts in [[World War II]]. At the start of the war Greece sided with the Allies and refused to give in to Italian demands. [[Italy]] invaded Greece by way of [[Albania]] on 28 October 1940, but Greek troops repelled the invaders after a bitter struggle (see [[Greco-Italian War]]). This marked the first Allied victory in the war.
 
 
Primarily to secure his strategic southern flank, German dictator [[Adolf Hitler]] reluctantly stepped in and launched the [[Battle of Greece]]. Troops from [[Germany]], [[Bulgaria]], and [[Italy]] successfully invaded Greece, through [[Yugoslavia]], overcoming Greek, British, [[Australian]], and [[New Zealand]] units.
 
 
On 20 May 1941, the Germans attempted to [[Battle of Crete|seize Crete]] with a large attack by [[paratroop]]s—with the aim of reducing the threat of a counter-offensive by Allied forces in [[Egypt]]—but faced heavy resistance. The Greek campaign might have delayed German military plans against Soviet Union, and it is argued that had the German invasion of the [[Soviet Union]] started on 20 May 1941 instead of 22 June 1941, the Nazi assault against the Soviet Union might have succeeded. The heavy losses of German paratroopers led the Germans to launch no further large-scale air-invasions.
 
 
During the years of [[Axis occupation of Greece|Occupation of Greece by Nazi Germany]], thousands of Greeks died in direct combat, in concentration camps, or of starvation. The occupiers murdered the greater part of the [[Jewish]] community despite efforts by the [[Church of Greece|Greek Orthodox]] Church and many other [[Christian]] Greeks to shelter the Jews. The economy of Greece was devastated.
 
 
When the Soviet Army began its drive across [[Romania]] in August 1944, the German Army in Greece began withdrawing north and northwestward from Greece into [[Yugoslavia]] and [[Albania]] to avoid being cut off in Greece. Hence, the German occupation of Greece ended in October 1944. The Resistance group [[Greek People's Liberation Army|ELAS]] seized control of Athens on 12 October 1944. British troops had already landed on 4 October in [[Patras]], and entered Athens at 14 October 1944.<ref>{{cite book|last=Churchill|first=S.W.|title=The Second World War (Volume 6)|year=1953|page=285}}</ref>
 
   
 
===Greek Civil War (1944–49)===
 
===Greek Civil War (1944–49)===
Reason: ANN scored at 0.976283
Reporter Information
Reporter: JimmiXzS (anonymous)
Date: Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 02:19:33 PM
Status: Reported
Sunday, the 4th of January 2015 at 12:20:57 PM #97461
gordon (anonymous)

lzOWd4 http://www.QS3PE5ZGdxC9IoVKTAPT2DBYpPkMKqfz.com

Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 02:19:33 PM #106530
JimmiXzS (anonymous)

dLsIi1 http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

Username:
Comment:
Captcha: