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ID: 1707632
User: Wes1230
Article: Rankine scale
Diff:
m (Removed protection from "Rankine scale": Editing dispute resolved)
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{{two other uses|the temperature scale|the idealized thermodynamic cycle for a steam engine|Rankine cycle|the scale measuring recovery after stroke|modified Rankin scale}}
 
{{two other uses|the temperature scale|the idealized thermodynamic cycle for a steam engine|Rankine cycle|the scale measuring recovery after stroke|modified Rankin scale}}
{{redirect|°R|other temperature scales sometimes indicated using this notation|Réaumur scale|and|Rømer scale}}
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{{redirect|R|other temperature scales sometimes indicated using this notation|Réaumur scale|and|Rømer scale}}
 
{{temperature}}
 
{{temperature}}
 
'''Rankine''' is a [[thermodynamic temperature|thermodynamic (absolute) temperature]] scale named after the [[Glasgow University]] [[engineer]] and [[physicist]] [[William John Macquorn Rankine]], who proposed it in 1859. (The [[Kelvin]] scale was first proposed in 1848.)
 
'''Rankine''' is a [[thermodynamic temperature|thermodynamic (absolute) temperature]] scale named after the [[Glasgow University]] [[engineer]] and [[physicist]] [[William John Macquorn Rankine]], who proposed it in 1859. (The [[Kelvin]] scale was first proposed in 1848.)
   
The symbol for '''degrees Rankine''' is °R<ref name="SP811"/> (or °Ra if necessary to distinguish it from the [[Rømer scale|Rømer]] and [[Réaumur scale|Réaumur]] scales). By analogy with Kelvin, some authors call the unit '''Rankine''', omitting the degree symbol.<ref name="dummies">{{cite book |last=Pauken |first=Michael |date=2011 |title= Thermodynamics For Dummies|url= |location=Indianapolis |publisher=Wiley Publishing Inc. |isbn=978-1-118-00291-9 |accessdate= |page=20}}</ref><ref name="engineering">{{cite book |last=Balmer |first=Robert |date=2011 |title=Modern Engineering Thermodynamics |url= |location=Oxford |publisher=Elsevier Inc. |isbn=978-0-12-374996-3 |accessdate= page=10}}</ref> Zero on both the Kelvin and Rankine scales is [[absolute zero]], but the Rankine degree is defined as equal to one degree [[Fahrenheit]], rather than the one degree [[Celsius]] used by the Kelvin scale. A temperature of −459.67 °F is exactly equal to 0 °R.
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The symbol for '''degrees Rankine''' is R<ref name="SP811"/> (or Ra if necessary to distinguish it from the [[Rømer scale|Rømer]] and [[Réaumur scale|Réaumur]] scales). By analogy with Kelvin, some authors call the unit '''Rankine''', omitting the degree symbol.<ref name="dummies">{{cite book |last=Pauken |first=Michael |date=2011 |title= Thermodynamics For Dummies|url= |location=Indianapolis |publisher=Wiley Publishing Inc. |isbn=978-1-118-00291-9 |accessdate= |page=20}}</ref><ref name="engineering">{{cite book |last=Balmer |first=Robert |date=2011 |title=Modern Engineering Thermodynamics |url= |location=Oxford |publisher=Elsevier Inc. |isbn=978-0-12-374996-3 |accessdate= page=10}}</ref> Zero on both the Kelvin and Rankine scales is [[absolute zero]], but the Rankine degree is defined as equal to one degree [[Fahrenheit]], rather than the one degree [[Celsius]] used by the Kelvin scale. A temperature of −459.67 °F is exactly equal to 0 R.
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Like Kelvins the correct way to represent Rankine is incorrect. Most people use °K to to represent Kelvins but the correct way is just K exactly like Rankine but it is unofficially °R though Rankine is expressed as either or.
   
 
Some engineering fields in the [[United States]] measure thermodynamic temperature using the Rankine scale.<ref name="physorg">http://www.physorg.com/tags/temperature/</ref> The US [[National Institute of Standards and Technology]] recommends not using degrees Rankine in NIST publications.<ref name="SP811">[http://physics.nist.gov/Pubs/SP811/appenB8.html B.8 Factors for Units Listed Alphabetically] from [http://physics.nist.gov/Pubs/SP811/contents.html Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI)], NIST Special Publication 811, 2008 edition, Ambler Thompson and Barry N. Taylor</ref>
 
Some engineering fields in the [[United States]] measure thermodynamic temperature using the Rankine scale.<ref name="physorg">http://www.physorg.com/tags/temperature/</ref> The US [[National Institute of Standards and Technology]] recommends not using degrees Rankine in NIST publications.<ref name="SP811">[http://physics.nist.gov/Pubs/SP811/appenB8.html B.8 Factors for Units Listed Alphabetically] from [http://physics.nist.gov/Pubs/SP811/contents.html Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI)], NIST Special Publication 811, 2008 edition, Ambler Thompson and Barry N. Taylor</ref>
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|align="center"|−273.15 °C
 
|align="center"|−273.15 °C
 
|align="center"|−459.67 °F
 
|align="center"|−459.67 °F
|align="center"|0 °R
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|align="center"|0 R
 
|-
 
|-
 
!Freezing point of brine<br>(by definition on Fahrenheit scale(only))
 
!Freezing point of brine<br>(by definition on Fahrenheit scale(only))
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|align="center"|−17.78 °C
 
|align="center"|−17.78 °C
 
|align="center"|0 °F
 
|align="center"|0 °F
|align="center"|459.67 °R
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|align="center"|459.67 R
 
|-
 
|-
 
!Freezing point of water<ref>The ice point of purified water has been measured to be 0.000089(10) degrees Celsius – see {{cite journal |last=Magnum |first=B.W. |date=June 1995 |title=Reproducibility of the Temperature of the Ice Point in Routine Measurements |journal=Nist Technical Note |volume=1411 |url=http://www.cstl.nist.gov/div836/836.05/papers/magnum95icept.pdf |format=PDF |accessdate=2007-02-11}}</ref>
 
!Freezing point of water<ref>The ice point of purified water has been measured to be 0.000089(10) degrees Celsius – see {{cite journal |last=Magnum |first=B.W. |date=June 1995 |title=Reproducibility of the Temperature of the Ice Point in Routine Measurements |journal=Nist Technical Note |volume=1411 |url=http://www.cstl.nist.gov/div836/836.05/papers/magnum95icept.pdf |format=PDF |accessdate=2007-02-11}}</ref>
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|align="center"|0 °C
 
|align="center"|0 °C
 
|align="center"|32 °F
 
|align="center"|32 °F
|align="center"|491.67 °R
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|align="center"|491.67 R
 
|-
 
|-
 
![[Triple point]] of water<br>(by definition)
 
![[Triple point]] of water<br>(by definition)
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|align="center"|0.01 °C
 
|align="center"|0.01 °C
 
|align="center"|32.018 °F
 
|align="center"|32.018 °F
|align="center"|491.688 °R
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|align="center"|491.688 R
 
|-
 
|-
 
![[Boiling point]] of water<ref>For [[Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water]] at one [[Atmosphere (unit)|standard atmosphere]] (101.325 kPa) when calibrated solely per the two-point definition of thermodynamic temperature. Older definitions of the Celsius scale once defined the boiling point of water under one standard atmosphere as being precisely 100&nbsp;°C. However, the current definition results in a boiling point that is actually 16.1&nbsp;mK less. For more about the actual boiling point of water, see [[Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water#VSMOW in temperature measurement|VSMOW in temperature measurement]].</ref>
 
![[Boiling point]] of water<ref>For [[Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water]] at one [[Atmosphere (unit)|standard atmosphere]] (101.325 kPa) when calibrated solely per the two-point definition of thermodynamic temperature. Older definitions of the Celsius scale once defined the boiling point of water under one standard atmosphere as being precisely 100&nbsp;°C. However, the current definition results in a boiling point that is actually 16.1&nbsp;mK less. For more about the actual boiling point of water, see [[Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water#VSMOW in temperature measurement|VSMOW in temperature measurement]].</ref>
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|align="center"|[[Celsius#Melting_and_boiling_points_of_water|99.9839 °C]]
 
|align="center"|[[Celsius#Melting_and_boiling_points_of_water|99.9839 °C]]
 
|align="center"|211.97102 °F
 
|align="center"|211.97102 °F
|align="center"|671.64102 °R
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|align="center"|671.64102 R
 
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|}
   
Reason: ANN scored at 0.891881
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:32:49 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 19th of February 2014 at 12:07:57 PM #93502
wes1230 (anonymous)

the correct way is R

Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:32:49 PM #101721
Bradley (anonymous)

xpQz7H http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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