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ID: 1732141
User: 71.184.122.12
Article: The Louvre
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The ''[[Palais du Louvre|Louvre Palace]]'' (''Palais du Louvre''), which houses the museum, was begun as a fortress by Philip II in the 12th century, with remnants of this building still visible in the crypt.<ref name="Mignot 32">Mignot,&nbsp;p.&nbsp;32</ref> Whether this was the first building on that spot is not known; it is possible that Philip modified an existing tower.<ref name="Edwards"/> Although some believe that the word 'louvre' may refer to the structure's status as the largest in late 12th&nbsp;century Paris (from the French ''L'Œuvre'', masterpiece) – or to its location in a forest (from the French ''rouvre'', oak) – according to the authoritative ''[[Grand Larousse encyclopédique]]'', it derives from an association with [[wolf hunting]] den (via Latin: ''lupus'', lower Empire: ''lupara'').<ref name="Edwards">Edwards,&nbsp;pp.&nbsp;193–94</ref><ref>In Larousse ''Nouveau Dictionnaire étymologique et historique'', Librairie Larousse, Paris, 1971, p. 430: ***'''loup''' 1080, Roland (''leu'', forme conservée dans ''à la queue leu leu'', ''Saint Leu'', etc.); du lat. lupus; loup est refait sur le fém. louve, où le *v* a empêché le passage du *ou* à *eu* (cf. Louvre, du lat. pop. lupara)*** the etymology of the word ''louvre'' is from ''lupara'', feminine (pop. Latin) form of ''lupus''.</ref> In the 7th century, St. Fare, an abbess in Meaux, left part of her "Villa called Luvra situated in the region of Paris" to a monastery.;<ref>In Lebeuf (Abbé), Fernand Bournon, ''Histoire de la ville et de tout le diocèse de Paris par l'abbé Lebeuf'', Vol 2, Paris: Féchoz et Letouzey, 1883, p. 296: "Louvre".</ref> this territory probably did not correspond exactly to the modern site, however.
 
The ''[[Palais du Louvre|Louvre Palace]]'' (''Palais du Louvre''), which houses the museum, was begun as a fortress by Philip II in the 12th century, with remnants of this building still visible in the crypt.<ref name="Mignot 32">Mignot,&nbsp;p.&nbsp;32</ref> Whether this was the first building on that spot is not known; it is possible that Philip modified an existing tower.<ref name="Edwards"/> Although some believe that the word 'louvre' may refer to the structure's status as the largest in late 12th&nbsp;century Paris (from the French ''L'Œuvre'', masterpiece) – or to its location in a forest (from the French ''rouvre'', oak) – according to the authoritative ''[[Grand Larousse encyclopédique]]'', it derives from an association with [[wolf hunting]] den (via Latin: ''lupus'', lower Empire: ''lupara'').<ref name="Edwards">Edwards,&nbsp;pp.&nbsp;193–94</ref><ref>In Larousse ''Nouveau Dictionnaire étymologique et historique'', Librairie Larousse, Paris, 1971, p. 430: ***'''loup''' 1080, Roland (''leu'', forme conservée dans ''à la queue leu leu'', ''Saint Leu'', etc.); du lat. lupus; loup est refait sur le fém. louve, où le *v* a empêché le passage du *ou* à *eu* (cf. Louvre, du lat. pop. lupara)*** the etymology of the word ''louvre'' is from ''lupara'', feminine (pop. Latin) form of ''lupus''.</ref> In the 7th century, St. Fare, an abbess in Meaux, left part of her "Villa called Luvra situated in the region of Paris" to a monastery.;<ref>In Lebeuf (Abbé), Fernand Bournon, ''Histoire de la ville et de tout le diocèse de Paris par l'abbé Lebeuf'', Vol 2, Paris: Féchoz et Letouzey, 1883, p. 296: "Louvre".</ref> this territory probably did not correspond exactly to the modern site, however.
   
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The Louvre Palace was hi matt ricci
The Louvre Palace was altered frequently throughout the [[Middle Ages]]. In the 14th&nbsp;century, [[Charles V of France|Charles&nbsp;V]] converted the building into a residence and in 1546, [[Francis I of France|Francis&nbsp;I]] renovated the site in [[French Renaissance]] style.<ref name="Edwards198">Edwards,&nbsp;p.&nbsp;198</ref> Francis acquired what would become the nucleus of the Louvre's holdings, his acquisitions including [[Leonardo da Vinci]]'s ''[[Mona Lisa]]''.<ref name="Mona">{{cite news|author=Chaundy, Bob|title=Faces of the Week|url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/5392000.stm|publisher=BBC |date=29 September 2006|accessdate=5 October 2007}}</ref> After Louis&nbsp;XIV chose Versailles as his residence in 1682, constructions slowed; however, the move permitted the Louvre to be used as a residence for artists.<ref name="Edwards198"/><ref>Mignot,&nbsp;p.&nbsp;42</ref><ref>Nore,&nbsp;p.&nbsp;274</ref>
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altered frequently throughout the [[Middle Ages]]. In the 14th&nbsp;century, [[Charles V of France|Charles&nbsp;V]] converted the building into a residence and in 1546, [[Francis I of France|Francis&nbsp;I]] renovated the site in [[French Renaissance]] style.<ref name="Edwards198">Edwards,&nbsp;p.&nbsp;198</ref> Francis acquired what would become the nucleus of the Louvre's holdings, his acquisitions including [[Leonardo da Vinci]]'s ''[[Mona Lisa]]''.<ref name="Mona">{{cite news|author=Chaundy, Bob|title=Faces of the Week|url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/5392000.stm|publisher=BBC |date=29 September 2006|accessdate=5 October 2007}}</ref> After Louis&nbsp;XIV chose Versailles as his residence in 1682, constructions slowed; however, the move permitted the Louvre to be used as a residence for artists.<ref name="Edwards198"/><ref>Mignot,&nbsp;p.&nbsp;42</ref><ref>Nore,&nbsp;p.&nbsp;274</ref>
   
 
By the mid-18th&nbsp;century there was an increasing number of proposals to create a public gallery, with the art critic La Font de Saint-Yenne publishing, in 1747, a call for a display of the royal collection'.<ref name="Carb 56">Carbonell, p.&nbsp;56</ref> On 14 October 1750, [[Louis XV of France|Louis XV]] agreed and sanctioned a display of 96 pieces from the royal collection, mounted in the ''Galerie royale de peinture'' of the [[Luxembourg Palace]]. A hall was opened by [[Charles François Paul Le Normant de Tournehem|Le Normant de Tournehem]] and the [[Abel François Poisson|Marquis de Marigny]] for public viewing of the ''Tableaux du Roy'' on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and contained [[Andrea del Sarto]]'s ''Charity'' and works by [[Raphael]]; [[Titian]]; [[Paolo Veronese|Veronese]]; [[Rembrandt]]; [[Nicolas Poussin|Poussin]] or [[Anthony van Dyck|Van Dyck]], until its closing in 1780 as a result of the gift of the palace to the [[Louis XVIII of France|comte de Provence]] by the king in 1778.<ref name="Nora 278"/> Under [[Louis XVI of France|Louis XVI]], the royal museum idea became policy.<ref name="Carb 56"/> The [[Charles-Claude Flahaut de la Billaderie, comte d'Angiviller|comte d'Angiviller]] broadened the collection and in 1776 proposed conversion of the ''Grande Galerie'' of the Louvre – which contained maps – into the "French Museum".<ref name="Nora 278"/> Many proposals were offered for the Louvre's renovation into a museum; however, none was agreed on. Hence the museum remained incomplete until the French Revolution.<ref name="Nora 278"/>
 
By the mid-18th&nbsp;century there was an increasing number of proposals to create a public gallery, with the art critic La Font de Saint-Yenne publishing, in 1747, a call for a display of the royal collection'.<ref name="Carb 56">Carbonell, p.&nbsp;56</ref> On 14 October 1750, [[Louis XV of France|Louis XV]] agreed and sanctioned a display of 96 pieces from the royal collection, mounted in the ''Galerie royale de peinture'' of the [[Luxembourg Palace]]. A hall was opened by [[Charles François Paul Le Normant de Tournehem|Le Normant de Tournehem]] and the [[Abel François Poisson|Marquis de Marigny]] for public viewing of the ''Tableaux du Roy'' on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and contained [[Andrea del Sarto]]'s ''Charity'' and works by [[Raphael]]; [[Titian]]; [[Paolo Veronese|Veronese]]; [[Rembrandt]]; [[Nicolas Poussin|Poussin]] or [[Anthony van Dyck|Van Dyck]], until its closing in 1780 as a result of the gift of the palace to the [[Louis XVIII of France|comte de Provence]] by the king in 1778.<ref name="Nora 278"/> Under [[Louis XVI of France|Louis XVI]], the royal museum idea became policy.<ref name="Carb 56"/> The [[Charles-Claude Flahaut de la Billaderie, comte d'Angiviller|comte d'Angiviller]] broadened the collection and in 1776 proposed conversion of the ''Grande Galerie'' of the Louvre – which contained maps – into the "French Museum".<ref name="Nora 278"/> Many proposals were offered for the Louvre's renovation into a museum; however, none was agreed on. Hence the museum remained incomplete until the French Revolution.<ref name="Nora 278"/>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.88703
Reporter Information
Reporter: JimmiXzS (anonymous)
Date: Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 11:05:59 AM
Status: Reported
Tuesday, the 6th of January 2015 at 05:23:22 AM #97558
sammy (anonymous)

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Friday, the 14th of October 2016 at 11:05:59 AM #106488
JimmiXzS (anonymous)

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