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ID: 1773794
User: 195.204.17.35
Article: Irish language
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|speakers=approx {{sigfig|133,000|2}} native within Ireland, smaller numbers living abroad
 
|speakers=approx {{sigfig|133,000|2}} native within Ireland, smaller numbers living abroad
 
|date=2011
 
|date=2011
|ref=<ref>{{ELL2}}</ref>
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|ref=<ref>{{ELL2}}</ref> Sander Muan
 
|speakers2=[[Second language|L2]]:
 
|speakers2=[[Second language|L2]]:
 
*1.77 million (native + L2) in [[Republic of Ireland]]
 
*1.77 million (native + L2) in [[Republic of Ireland]]
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Irish was the predominant language of the Irish people for most of their recorded history, and they brought it with them to other countries, notably [[Scotland]] and the [[Isle of Man]], where it gave rise to [[Scottish Gaelic]] and [[Manx language|Manx]].<ref>{{cite book | author = Robert D. Borsley |author2=Ian G. Roberts | title = The Syntax of the Celtic Languages: A Comparative Perspective | publisher= Cambridge University Press | year = 1996 | pages = 2–3 | isbn =978-0-521-48160-1}}</ref><ref>{{cite encyclopedia | last = Gillies | first = William | editor1-last = Ball | editor1-first = Martin J. | editor2-last = Fife | editor2-first = James | title = Scottish Gaelic | encyclopedia = The Celtic Languages | page = 145 | publisher = Routledge | location = London | year = 1993 | url=http://books.google.com/books?id=BP9QCJ2FQzYC&lpg=PP1&dq=the%20celtic%20languages&pg=PA145#v=onepage&q=Gaelic&f=false | isbn = 9780415280808}}</ref><ref>{{cite encyclopedia | last = Broderick | first = George | editor1-last = Ball | editor1-first = Martin J. | editor2-last = Fife | editor2-first = James | title = Manx | encyclopedia = The Celtic Languages | page = 228 | publisher = Routledge | location = London | year = 1993 | url=http://books.google.com/books?id=BP9QCJ2FQzYC&lpg=PP1&dq=the%20celtic%20languages&pg=PA228#v=onepage&q=manx&f=false | isbn = 9780415280808}}</ref> It has [[early Irish literature|the oldest vernacular literature]] in Western Europe.<ref>{{Cite book|title=An Irish literature reader |last=Maureen O'Rourke Murphy, James MacKillop |publisher=Syracuse University Press |isbn= |page=3 |url= }}</ref>
 
Irish was the predominant language of the Irish people for most of their recorded history, and they brought it with them to other countries, notably [[Scotland]] and the [[Isle of Man]], where it gave rise to [[Scottish Gaelic]] and [[Manx language|Manx]].<ref>{{cite book | author = Robert D. Borsley |author2=Ian G. Roberts | title = The Syntax of the Celtic Languages: A Comparative Perspective | publisher= Cambridge University Press | year = 1996 | pages = 2–3 | isbn =978-0-521-48160-1}}</ref><ref>{{cite encyclopedia | last = Gillies | first = William | editor1-last = Ball | editor1-first = Martin J. | editor2-last = Fife | editor2-first = James | title = Scottish Gaelic | encyclopedia = The Celtic Languages | page = 145 | publisher = Routledge | location = London | year = 1993 | url=http://books.google.com/books?id=BP9QCJ2FQzYC&lpg=PP1&dq=the%20celtic%20languages&pg=PA145#v=onepage&q=Gaelic&f=false | isbn = 9780415280808}}</ref><ref>{{cite encyclopedia | last = Broderick | first = George | editor1-last = Ball | editor1-first = Martin J. | editor2-last = Fife | editor2-first = James | title = Manx | encyclopedia = The Celtic Languages | page = 228 | publisher = Routledge | location = London | year = 1993 | url=http://books.google.com/books?id=BP9QCJ2FQzYC&lpg=PP1&dq=the%20celtic%20languages&pg=PA228#v=onepage&q=manx&f=false | isbn = 9780415280808}}</ref> It has [[early Irish literature|the oldest vernacular literature]] in Western Europe.<ref>{{Cite book|title=An Irish literature reader |last=Maureen O'Rourke Murphy, James MacKillop |publisher=Syracuse University Press |isbn= |page=3 |url= }}</ref>
   
The fate of the language was influenced by the increasing power of the English state in Ireland. Elizabethan officials viewed the use of Irish unfavourably, as being a threat to all things English in Ireland. Its decline began under English rule in the seventeenth century. In the latter part of the nineteenth century there was a dramatic decrease in the number of speakers, beginning after the [[Great Famine (Ireland)|Great Famine]] of 1845–1852 (when Ireland lost 20–25% of its population either to emigration or death). Irish-speaking areas were hit especially hard. By the end of British rule, the language was spoken by less than 15% of the national population.<ref>{{Cite book|title=Languages in Britain and Ireland |first=Glanville |last=Price |year=2000 |publisher=Wiley-Blackwell |isbn= |page=10 |url= }}</ref> Since then, Irish speakers have been in the minority except in areas collectively known as the [[Gaeltacht]]. Efforts have been made by the state, individuals and organisations to preserve, promote and revive the language, but with mixed results.
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The fate of the language was influenced by the increasing power of the English state in Ireland. Elizabethan officials viewed the use of Irish unfavourably, as being a threat to all things English in Ireland. Its decline began under English rule in the seventeenth century. In the latter part of the nineteenth century there was a dramatic decrease in the number of speakers, beginning after the [[Great Famine (Ireland)|Great Famine]] of 1845–1852 (when Ireland lost 20–25% of its population either to emigration or death). Irish-speaking areas were hit especially hard. By the end of British rule, the language was spoken by less than 15% of the national population.<ref>{{Cite book|title=Languages in Britain and Ireland |first=Glanville |last=Price |year=2000 |publisher=Wiley-Blackwell |isbn= |page=10 |url= }}</ref> Since then, Irish speakers have been in the minority except in areas collectively known as the [[Gaeltacht]]. Efforts have been made by the state, individuals and organisations to preserve, promote and revive the language, but with mixed results. Sander Muan
   
 
Around the turn of the 21st century, estimates of native speakers ranged from 20,000 to 80,000 people.<ref>{{Cite book|title=Linguistic Minorities in Multilingual Settings: Implications for Language Policies |last=Christina Bratt Paulston |publisher=J. Benjamins Pub. Co |page=81}}</ref><ref>{{Cite book|title=Irish Writing in the Twentieth Century |last=Pierce |first=David |year=2000 |publisher=Cork University Press |page=1140}}: 20,000 to 80,000 speakers out of a population of 3.5 to 5 million.</ref><ref>{{Cite journal|last=Ó hÉallaithe |first=Donncha |year=1999 |title= |journal=Cuisle |id= |url= |quote= }}</ref> In the 2006 census for the Republic, 85,000 people reported using Irish as a daily language outside of the education system, and 1.2 million reported using it at least occasionally in or out of school.<ref>http://census.cso.ie/Census/TableViewer/tableView.aspx?ReportId=75642</ref> In the 2011 Census, these numbers had increased to 94,000 and 1.3 million, respectively.<ref name="Census 2011 - This is Ireland">{{cite web|url=http://www.cso.ie/en/media/csoie/census/documents/census2011pdr/Pdf%208%20Tables.pdf|title=Census 2011 – This is Ireland|publisher=Central Statistics Office|format=PDF}}</ref> There are several thousand Irish speakers in [[Northern Ireland]]. It has been estimated that the active Irish-language scene probably comprises 5 to 10 per cent of Ireland's population.<ref>Suzanne Romaine, “Irish in a Global Context” in ''A New View of the Irish Language'', edited by Caoilfhionn Nic Pháidín and Seán Ó Cearnaigh. Dublin: Cois Life Teoranta, 2008. ISBN 978-1-901176-82-7</ref>
 
Around the turn of the 21st century, estimates of native speakers ranged from 20,000 to 80,000 people.<ref>{{Cite book|title=Linguistic Minorities in Multilingual Settings: Implications for Language Policies |last=Christina Bratt Paulston |publisher=J. Benjamins Pub. Co |page=81}}</ref><ref>{{Cite book|title=Irish Writing in the Twentieth Century |last=Pierce |first=David |year=2000 |publisher=Cork University Press |page=1140}}: 20,000 to 80,000 speakers out of a population of 3.5 to 5 million.</ref><ref>{{Cite journal|last=Ó hÉallaithe |first=Donncha |year=1999 |title= |journal=Cuisle |id= |url= |quote= }}</ref> In the 2006 census for the Republic, 85,000 people reported using Irish as a daily language outside of the education system, and 1.2 million reported using it at least occasionally in or out of school.<ref>http://census.cso.ie/Census/TableViewer/tableView.aspx?ReportId=75642</ref> In the 2011 Census, these numbers had increased to 94,000 and 1.3 million, respectively.<ref name="Census 2011 - This is Ireland">{{cite web|url=http://www.cso.ie/en/media/csoie/census/documents/census2011pdr/Pdf%208%20Tables.pdf|title=Census 2011 – This is Ireland|publisher=Central Statistics Office|format=PDF}}</ref> There are several thousand Irish speakers in [[Northern Ireland]]. It has been estimated that the active Irish-language scene probably comprises 5 to 10 per cent of Ireland's population.<ref>Suzanne Romaine, “Irish in a Global Context” in ''A New View of the Irish Language'', edited by Caoilfhionn Nic Pháidín and Seán Ó Cearnaigh. Dublin: Cois Life Teoranta, 2008. ISBN 978-1-901176-82-7</ref>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.905699
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:26:38 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:26:38 PM #101706
Bradley (anonymous)

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