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ID: 1774800
User: 66.210.54.226
Article: History of Washington, D.C.
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m (Reverted edits by 68.36.235.130 (talk) to last version by DadaNeem)
(Founding)
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<blockquote>To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of Particular States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards and other needful Buildings;<ref>[[s:Constitution of the United States of America#Article I|Wikisource: Constitution of the United States of America]]</ref></blockquote>
 
<blockquote>To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of Particular States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards and other needful Buildings;<ref>[[s:Constitution of the United States of America#Article I|Wikisource: Constitution of the United States of America]]</ref></blockquote>
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it was known as dc
   
 
[[James Madison]], writing in [[Federalist No. 43]], also argued that the national capital needed to be distinct from the states, in order to provide for its own maintenance and safety.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://thomas.loc.gov/home/fedpapers/fed_43.html |title=The Federalist No. 43 |accessdate=2008-05-31 |last=Madison |first=James |date=April 30, 1996 |work=The Independent Journal |publisher=Library of Congress }}</ref> The Constitution, however, does not select a specific site for the location of the new District. Proposals from the legislatures of Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Virginia all offered territory for the location of the national capital. Northern states preferred a capital located in one of the nation's prominent cities, unsurprisingly, almost all of which were in the north. Conversely, [[Southern United States|Southern]] states preferred that the capital be located closer to their agricultural and slave-holding interests.<ref>{{cite book |last=Crew |first=Harvey W. |coauthors=William Bensing Webb, John Wooldridge |title=Centennial History of the City of Washington, D. C. |publisher=United Brethren Publishing House |year=1892 |location=[[Dayton, Ohio]] |url=http://books.google.com/?id=5Q81AAAAIAAJ |pages=67–80}}</ref> The selection of the area around the Potomac River, which was the boundary between Maryland and Virginia, both slave states, was agreed upon between James Madison, [[Thomas Jefferson]], and [[Alexander Hamilton]]. Hamilton had a proposal for the new federal government to take over debts accrued by the states during the Revolutionary War. However, by 1790, Southern states had largely repaid their overseas debts. Hamilton's proposal would require Southern states to assume a share of Northern debt. Jefferson and Madison agreed to this proposal and in return secured a Southern location for the federal capital.<ref name="Morison">{{cite book |last=Morison |first=Samuel Eliot |title=The Oxford History of the American People, Vol. 2 |publisher=Meridian |year=1972 |chapter=Washington's First Administration: 1789–1793}}</ref>
 
[[James Madison]], writing in [[Federalist No. 43]], also argued that the national capital needed to be distinct from the states, in order to provide for its own maintenance and safety.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://thomas.loc.gov/home/fedpapers/fed_43.html |title=The Federalist No. 43 |accessdate=2008-05-31 |last=Madison |first=James |date=April 30, 1996 |work=The Independent Journal |publisher=Library of Congress }}</ref> The Constitution, however, does not select a specific site for the location of the new District. Proposals from the legislatures of Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Virginia all offered territory for the location of the national capital. Northern states preferred a capital located in one of the nation's prominent cities, unsurprisingly, almost all of which were in the north. Conversely, [[Southern United States|Southern]] states preferred that the capital be located closer to their agricultural and slave-holding interests.<ref>{{cite book |last=Crew |first=Harvey W. |coauthors=William Bensing Webb, John Wooldridge |title=Centennial History of the City of Washington, D. C. |publisher=United Brethren Publishing House |year=1892 |location=[[Dayton, Ohio]] |url=http://books.google.com/?id=5Q81AAAAIAAJ |pages=67–80}}</ref> The selection of the area around the Potomac River, which was the boundary between Maryland and Virginia, both slave states, was agreed upon between James Madison, [[Thomas Jefferson]], and [[Alexander Hamilton]]. Hamilton had a proposal for the new federal government to take over debts accrued by the states during the Revolutionary War. However, by 1790, Southern states had largely repaid their overseas debts. Hamilton's proposal would require Southern states to assume a share of Northern debt. Jefferson and Madison agreed to this proposal and in return secured a Southern location for the federal capital.<ref name="Morison">{{cite book |last=Morison |first=Samuel Eliot |title=The Oxford History of the American People, Vol. 2 |publisher=Meridian |year=1972 |chapter=Washington's First Administration: 1789–1793}}</ref>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.918874
Reporter Information
Reporter: Mark (anonymous)
Date: Thursday, the 12th of May 2016 at 08:38:03 AM
Status: Reported
Thursday, the 12th of May 2016 at 08:38:03 AM #104332
Mark (anonymous)

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