ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Viewing 1780027

Navigation

ID: 1780027
User: 204.185.229.253
Article: Texas Longhorn
Diff:
(Purpose)
Line 2: Line 2:
 
{{Use mdy dates|date=November 2013}}
 
{{Use mdy dates|date=November 2013}}
 
[[Image:Texas Longhorn cow.jpg|thumb|300px|A Texas Longhorn cow]]
 
[[Image:Texas Longhorn cow.jpg|thumb|300px|A Texas Longhorn cow]]
The '''Texas Longhorn''' is a breed of [[cattle]] known for its characteristic horns, which can extend to {{convert|7|ft|m|abbr=on}}<ref>{{cite journal |url=http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/07/food-ark/cattle-breeds#/6 |first=Charles |last=Siebert |title=Food Ark |journal=National Geographic |date=July 2011}}</ref> tip to tip for steers and exceptional cows, and {{convert|36|to|80|in|m|abbr=on}} tip to tip for bulls. Similar cattle were imported by Spanish colonists into other parts of North America, including [[California]] and [[Florida Cracker cattle|Florida]]. Horns can have a slight upward turn at their tips or even triple twist. Texas Longhorns are known for their diverse coloring. A longhorn can be any color or mix of colors but dark red and white color mixes are the most dominant. Texas Longhorns with elite genetics can often fetch $40,000 or more at auction with the record of $170,000 in recent history for a cow.<ref>Herskovitz, John. [http://www.enn.com/today.html?id=463 Texas Returns to Passion of the Longhorn] ''[[Reuters]]'' via ''Environmental News Network''. November 26, 2004.</ref> Due to their innate gentle disposition and intelligence, Texas Longhorns are increasingly being trained as riding steers.
+
The '''Texas Longhorn''' is a breed of [[cattle]] known for its characteristic horns, which can extend to {{convert|7|ft|m|abbr=on}}<ref>{{cite journal |url=http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/07/food-ark/cattle-breeds#/6 |first=Charles |last=Siebert |title=Food Ark |journal=National Geographic |date=July 2011}}</ref> tip to tip for steers and exceptionally Ashlyn
  +
  +
cows, and {{convert|36|to|80|in|m|abbr=on}} tip to tip for bulls. Similar cattle were imported by Spanish colonists into other parts of North America, including [[California]] and [[Florida Cracker cattle|Florida]]. Horns can have a slight upward turn at their tips or even triple twist. Texas Longhorns are known for their diverse coloring. A longhorn can be any color or mix of colors but dark red and white color mixes are the most dominant. Texas Longhorns with elite genetics can often fetch $40,000 or more at auction with the record of $170,000 in recent history for a cow.<ref>Herskovitz, John. [http://www.enn.com/today.html?id=463 Texas Returns to Passion of the Longhorn] ''[[Reuters]]'' via ''Environmental News Network''. November 26, 2004.</ref> Due to their innate gentle disposition and intelligence, Texas Longhorns are increasingly being trained as riding steers.
   
 
[[breed registry|Registries]] for the breed include the [[Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America]], the [[International Texas Longhorn Association]], and the [[Cattlemen’s Texas Longhorn Registry]].<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.ctlr.org/index.html/ |title=Cattlemen’s Texas Longhorn Registry |publisher=Cattlemen’s Texas Longhorn Registry |accessdate=2013-12-13}}</ref>
 
[[breed registry|Registries]] for the breed include the [[Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America]], the [[International Texas Longhorn Association]], and the [[Cattlemen’s Texas Longhorn Registry]].<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.ctlr.org/index.html/ |title=Cattlemen’s Texas Longhorn Registry |publisher=Cattlemen’s Texas Longhorn Registry |accessdate=2013-12-13}}</ref>
Line 8: Line 8:
 
==History of the breed==
 
==History of the breed==
 
[[Image:Texas Longhorn Steer Rocksprings.jpg|thumb|250px|A Texas Longhorn steer]]
 
[[Image:Texas Longhorn Steer Rocksprings.jpg|thumb|250px|A Texas Longhorn steer]]
Genetic analyses show the Longhorn originated from an Iberian hybrid of two ancient cattle lineages: "taurine" descending from the domestication of the wild [[aurochs]] in the Middle East, and "indicine", descending from the [[Zebu|domestication]] of the [[Indian aurochs|aurochs in India]], 85% and 15% respectively by proportion.<ref name=McTav2013>
+
Genetic analyses show the Longhorn originated from an Iberian hybrid of two ancient cattle lineages: "taurine" descending from the domestication of the wild [[aurochs]] in the Middle East, and "indicine", descending from the [[Zebu|domestication]] of the [[Indian aurochs|aurochs in India]], 85% and 15% respectively by proportion.<ref name=McTav2013> grey duicks-
 
{{cite journal | first = Emily Jane | last = McTavish | coauthors = Jared E. Decker, Robert D. Schnabel, Jeremy F. Taylor, David M. Hillis | title = New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events | journal = PNAS | year = 2013 | doi= 10.1073/pnas.1303367110}}</ref> The Texas Longhorns are direct descendants of the first cattle in the [[New World]]. The ancestral cattle were first brought over by [[Christopher Columbus]] in 1493 to the Caribbean island of [[Hispaniola]]. Between 1493 and 1512, Spanish colonists brought additional cattle in subsequent expeditions.<ref name=Rouse1977>{{cite book|first=John E. |last=Rouse |year=1977|title=The Criollo: Spanish Cattle in the Americas|publisher=University of Oklahoma Press |location=Norman, Oklahoma}}</ref> The cattle consisted of three different breeds; ''Barrenda'', ''Retinto'' and ''Grande Pieto''.<ref>{{cite book|last=Stacy|first=Lee|title=Mexico and the United States|year=2003|publisher=Marshall Cavendish|location=Tarrytown, New York|isbn=0761474021|page=233|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=DSzyMGh8pNwC&pg=PA233&lpg=PA233&dq=barrenda+cattle&source=bl&ots=6C-gK67-RT&sig=ddWaZJ0z8bgvGj3Q0XZlCHLzy4I&hl=en&sa=X&ei=7BeaUs3nEMnsoATCz4GADQ&ved=0CEYQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=barrenda%20cattle&f=false}}</ref> Over the next two centuries the Spanish moved the cattle north, arriving in the area that would become Texas near the end of the 17th century. The cattle escaped or were turned loose on the open range, where they remained mostly [[feral]] for the next two centuries. Over several generations, descendants of these cattle evolved the high feed- and drought-stress tolerance and other "hardy" characteristics that Longhorns have become known for.<ref>{{cite book |first=Terrence J. |last=Barragy |year=2003 |title=
 
{{cite journal | first = Emily Jane | last = McTavish | coauthors = Jared E. Decker, Robert D. Schnabel, Jeremy F. Taylor, David M. Hillis | title = New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events | journal = PNAS | year = 2013 | doi= 10.1073/pnas.1303367110}}</ref> The Texas Longhorns are direct descendants of the first cattle in the [[New World]]. The ancestral cattle were first brought over by [[Christopher Columbus]] in 1493 to the Caribbean island of [[Hispaniola]]. Between 1493 and 1512, Spanish colonists brought additional cattle in subsequent expeditions.<ref name=Rouse1977>{{cite book|first=John E. |last=Rouse |year=1977|title=The Criollo: Spanish Cattle in the Americas|publisher=University of Oklahoma Press |location=Norman, Oklahoma}}</ref> The cattle consisted of three different breeds; ''Barrenda'', ''Retinto'' and ''Grande Pieto''.<ref>{{cite book|last=Stacy|first=Lee|title=Mexico and the United States|year=2003|publisher=Marshall Cavendish|location=Tarrytown, New York|isbn=0761474021|page=233|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=DSzyMGh8pNwC&pg=PA233&lpg=PA233&dq=barrenda+cattle&source=bl&ots=6C-gK67-RT&sig=ddWaZJ0z8bgvGj3Q0XZlCHLzy4I&hl=en&sa=X&ei=7BeaUs3nEMnsoATCz4GADQ&ved=0CEYQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=barrenda%20cattle&f=false}}</ref> Over the next two centuries the Spanish moved the cattle north, arriving in the area that would become Texas near the end of the 17th century. The cattle escaped or were turned loose on the open range, where they remained mostly [[feral]] for the next two centuries. Over several generations, descendants of these cattle evolved the high feed- and drought-stress tolerance and other "hardy" characteristics that Longhorns have become known for.<ref>{{cite book |first=Terrence J. |last=Barragy |year=2003 |title=
 
Gathering Texas Gold |isbn=9780961160487 |publisher=Cayo Del Grullo Press |location=Cayo del Grullo, TX}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |url= http://www.sciencedaily.com­/releases/2013/03/130325160514.htm |author=University of Texas at Austin |title=Decoding the genetic history of the Texas longhorn. |work=ScienceDaily |date=2013-03-25 |accessdate=2013-04-07}}</ref>
 
Gathering Texas Gold |isbn=9780961160487 |publisher=Cayo Del Grullo Press |location=Cayo del Grullo, TX}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |url= http://www.sciencedaily.com­/releases/2013/03/130325160514.htm |author=University of Texas at Austin |title=Decoding the genetic history of the Texas longhorn. |work=ScienceDaily |date=2013-03-25 |accessdate=2013-04-07}}</ref>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.955085
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:45:33 PM
Status: Reported
Monday, the 5th of January 2015 at 07:39:40 AM #97514
sammy (anonymous)

i2YtC7 http://www.QS3PE5ZGdxC9IoVKTAPT2DBYpPkMKqfz.com

Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:45:33 PM #101738
Bradley (anonymous)

AKZKgi http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

Username:
Comment: