ClueBot NG Report Interface

// Viewing 1800450

Navigation

ID: 1800450
User: 209.7.119.86
Article: VHS
Diff:
m (Reverted 1 edit by 70.188.12.90 (talk) to last revision by Abce2. (TW))
(History)
(Tag: Possible vandalism)
Line 32: Line 32:
 
=== Prior to VHS ===
 
=== Prior to VHS ===
 
{{details|Video tape recorder}}
 
{{details|Video tape recorder}}
After several attempts by other companies, the first commercially successful video tape recorder (VTR), the [[Quadruplex videotape|AMPEX VRX-1000]], was introduced in 1956 by [[Ampex|AMPEX Corporation]].<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.cedmagic.com/history/ampex-commercial-vtr-1956.html |title=AMPEX VRX-1000 – The First Commercial Videotape Recorder in 1956 | publisher=CED Magic |accessdate=2013-03-24}}</ref> At a price of US$50,000 in 1956, and US$300 for a 90-minute reel of tape, it was intended only for the professional market.
+
After several computer monitors showed inapropriate genitallllia attempts by other companies, the first commercially successful video tape recorder (VTR), the [[Quadruplex videotape|AMPEX VRX-1000]], was introduced in 1956 by [[Ampex|AMPEX Corporation]].<ref>{{cite web|url=http://www.cedmagic.com/history/ampex-commercial-vtr-1956.html |title=AMPEX VRX-1000 – The First Commercial Videotape Recorder in 1956 | publisher=CED Magic |accessdate=2013-03-24}}</ref> At a price of US$50,000 in 1956, and US$300 for a 90-minute reel of tape, it was intended only for the professional market.
   
 
[[Kenjiro Takayanagi]], a television broadcasting pioneer now working for JVC as its vice president, saw the need for his company to produce VTRs for the Japan market, and at a more affordable price. In 1959, JVC developed a two-head video tape recorder, and by 1960 a color version for professional broadcasting.<ref name="takayanagi">{{cite book|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=TOMOmmrvwCcC|title=The History of Television 1942-2000, pg 169 |publisher=Albert Abramson |year=2003 |accessdate=2013-03-24|isbn=9780786432431}}</ref> In 1964, JVC released the DV220, and would be the company's standard VTR until the mid-1970s.
 
[[Kenjiro Takayanagi]], a television broadcasting pioneer now working for JVC as its vice president, saw the need for his company to produce VTRs for the Japan market, and at a more affordable price. In 1959, JVC developed a two-head video tape recorder, and by 1960 a color version for professional broadcasting.<ref name="takayanagi">{{cite book|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=TOMOmmrvwCcC|title=The History of Television 1942-2000, pg 169 |publisher=Albert Abramson |year=2003 |accessdate=2013-03-24|isbn=9780786432431}}</ref> In 1964, JVC released the DV220, and would be the company's standard VTR until the mid-1970s.
Reason: ANN scored at 0.907767
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 05:11:35 PM
Status: Reported
Monday, the 21st of April 2014 at 09:40:32 AM #94187
Anonymous (anonymous)

it was funny right :)

Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 05:11:35 PM #101614
Bradley (anonymous)

hNH37V http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

Username:
Comment: