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ID: 842826
User: 74.92.22.122
Article: Grapefruit
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The '''grapefruit''' (''Citrus [[Hybrid name|×]] paradisi'') is a [[subtropics|subtropical]] [[citrus]] tree known for its sour [[fruit]], an 18th-century [[Hybrid (biology)|hybrid]] first bred in [[Barbados]].<ref name="Carrington & Fraser">{{cite book |last1=Carrington |first1=Sean |last2=Fraser |first2=HenryC |title=A~Z of Barbados Heritage |accessdate=6 April 2010 |edition= |series= |volume= |date= |year=2003 |month= |origyear= |publisher=Macmillan Caribbean |location= |isbn=0333920686 |pages=90–91 |chapter=Grapefruit |quote=One of many citrus species grown in Barbados. This fruit is believed to have originated in Barbados as a natural cross between sweet orange (''C. sinesis'') and Shadock (''C. grandis''), both of which were introduced from Asia in the seventeenth century. The grapefruit first appeared as an illustration entitled 'The Forbidden Fruit Tree' in the Rev. Griffith Hughes' ''The Natural History of Barbados'' (1750). This accords with the scientific name which literally means 'citrus of paradise'. The fruit was obviously fairly common around that time since George Washington in his Barbados Journal (1750-1751) mentions 'the Forbidden Fruit' as one of the local fruit available at a dinner party he attended. The plant was later described in the 1837 ''Flora of Jamaica'' as the Barbados Grapefruit. These historical arguments and experimental work on leaf enzymes and oils from possible parents all support a Barbadian origin for the fruit.}}</ref> When found, it was named the "[[forbidden fruit]]";<ref name="Forbidden_Fruit">{{cite book |author=Dowling, Curtis F.; [[Julia Morton|Morton, Julia Frances]] |title=Fruits of warm climates |publisher=J. F. Morton |location=[[Miami, FL]] |year=1987 |isbn=0-9610184-1-0 |oclc= 16947184 |url=http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/grapefruit.html }}</ref> and it has also been misidentified with the [[pomelo]] or shaddock (''C. maxima''), one of the parents of this hybrid, the other being [[Orange (fruit)|sweet orange]] (''C. × sinensis'').
 
The '''grapefruit''' (''Citrus [[Hybrid name|×]] paradisi'') is a [[subtropics|subtropical]] [[citrus]] tree known for its sour [[fruit]], an 18th-century [[Hybrid (biology)|hybrid]] first bred in [[Barbados]].<ref name="Carrington & Fraser">{{cite book |last1=Carrington |first1=Sean |last2=Fraser |first2=HenryC |title=A~Z of Barbados Heritage |accessdate=6 April 2010 |edition= |series= |volume= |date= |year=2003 |month= |origyear= |publisher=Macmillan Caribbean |location= |isbn=0333920686 |pages=90–91 |chapter=Grapefruit |quote=One of many citrus species grown in Barbados. This fruit is believed to have originated in Barbados as a natural cross between sweet orange (''C. sinesis'') and Shadock (''C. grandis''), both of which were introduced from Asia in the seventeenth century. The grapefruit first appeared as an illustration entitled 'The Forbidden Fruit Tree' in the Rev. Griffith Hughes' ''The Natural History of Barbados'' (1750). This accords with the scientific name which literally means 'citrus of paradise'. The fruit was obviously fairly common around that time since George Washington in his Barbados Journal (1750-1751) mentions 'the Forbidden Fruit' as one of the local fruit available at a dinner party he attended. The plant was later described in the 1837 ''Flora of Jamaica'' as the Barbados Grapefruit. These historical arguments and experimental work on leaf enzymes and oils from possible parents all support a Barbadian origin for the fruit.}}</ref> When found, it was named the "[[forbidden fruit]]";<ref name="Forbidden_Fruit">{{cite book |author=Dowling, Curtis F.; [[Julia Morton|Morton, Julia Frances]] |title=Fruits of warm climates |publisher=J. F. Morton |location=[[Miami, FL]] |year=1987 |isbn=0-9610184-1-0 |oclc= 16947184 |url=http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/grapefruit.html }}</ref> and it has also been misidentified with the [[pomelo]] or shaddock (''C. maxima''), one of the parents of this hybrid, the other being [[Orange (fruit)|sweet orange]] (''C. × sinensis'').
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hehe i edited this document and u cant do anything bout it huh PUNK?
   
 
These evergreen trees usually grow to around {{convert|5|–|6|m|ft|sp=us}} tall, although they can reach {{convert|13|–|15|m|ft|sp=us}}. The leaves are dark green, long (up to 150&nbsp;mm, 6&nbsp;inches) and thin. It produces {{convert|5|cm|in|0|abbr=on}} white four-petaled [[flower]]s. The fruit is yellow-orange skinned and largely an [[oblate spheroid]]; it ranges in diameter from 10–15&nbsp;cm. The flesh is segmented and [[acid]]ic, varying in color depending on the [[cultivar]]s, which include white, pink and red pulps of varying sweetness. The 1929 US Ruby Red (of the Redblush variety) has the first grapefruit [[patent]].<ref name="txsweet">[http://www.texasweet.com/About-Texas-Citrus/Texas-Grapefruit-History Texas grapefruit history], TexaSweet. Retrieved 2 July 2008.</ref>
 
These evergreen trees usually grow to around {{convert|5|–|6|m|ft|sp=us}} tall, although they can reach {{convert|13|–|15|m|ft|sp=us}}. The leaves are dark green, long (up to 150&nbsp;mm, 6&nbsp;inches) and thin. It produces {{convert|5|cm|in|0|abbr=on}} white four-petaled [[flower]]s. The fruit is yellow-orange skinned and largely an [[oblate spheroid]]; it ranges in diameter from 10–15&nbsp;cm. The flesh is segmented and [[acid]]ic, varying in color depending on the [[cultivar]]s, which include white, pink and red pulps of varying sweetness. The 1929 US Ruby Red (of the Redblush variety) has the first grapefruit [[patent]].<ref name="txsweet">[http://www.texasweet.com/About-Texas-Citrus/Texas-Grapefruit-History Texas grapefruit history], TexaSweet. Retrieved 2 July 2008.</ref>
Reason: ANN scored at 1
Reporter Information
Reporter: Mark (anonymous)
Date: Thursday, the 12th of May 2016 at 08:38:20 AM
Status: Reported
Thursday, the 12th of May 2016 at 08:38:20 AM #104339
Mark (anonymous)

8TnIji http://www.y7YwKx7Pm6OnyJvolbcwrWdoEnRF29pb.com

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