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[[File:Sun temple martand indogreek.jpg|thumb|''General view of [[Temple]] and Enclosure of [[Surya|Marttand]] (the [[Sun]]), at Bhawan, ca. 490–555; the colonnade ca. 693–729.'' [[Surya]] [[Mandir]] at [[Anantnag#Martand Sun Temple|Martand]], Jammu & Kashmir, India, photographed by John Burke, 1868.]]
 
[[File:Sun temple martand indogreek.jpg|thumb|''General view of [[Temple]] and Enclosure of [[Surya|Marttand]] (the [[Sun]]), at Bhawan, ca. 490–555; the colonnade ca. 693–729.'' [[Surya]] [[Mandir]] at [[Anantnag#Martand Sun Temple|Martand]], Jammu & Kashmir, India, photographed by John Burke, 1868.]]
   
The word Kashmir is an ancient [[Sanskrit]] word which literally means Land of [[Kashyap]] Rishi. [[Kashyap]] Rishi was a [[Saraswat Brahmin]] and one of the [[Saptarshi]]s, who was key in formalizing the ancient [[Historical Vedic Religion]]. The [[Kashmiri Pandits]] are his descendants and have named the valley after him, in his honour. According to the "Nilmat [[Puranas|Puran]]," the oldest book on Kashmir, in the Satisar, a former lake in the Kashmir Valley meaning "lake of the Goddess [[Dakshayani|Sati]],"<ref name="Bansi Pandit">{{Cite book|url = http://books.google.com/books?id=zsoC6GWr47QC&pg=PA17&dq=kashmir+kashyap#v=onepage&q=kashmir%20kashyap&f=false|author=Bansi Pandit|title=Explore Kashmiri Pandits|publisher =Dharma Publications|quote=According to the Nilmat Purana, the sixth century Sanskrit Classic, the present day Kashmir valley was a large lake (called Satisar, meaning 'the lake of Goddess Sati', the consort of Lord Shiva) surrounded by gigantic snow peaked mountains. The lake was inhabitaed by a giant demon, called Jalodbhava (i.e., 'born of water'). He devoured and terrotized the Nagas (Aborigines/Tribes), who lived in the mountains surrounding the lake. It is said that the Kashyap Rishi (grandson of Lord Brahma, the creator of the universe) once went on a pilgrimage to Kashmir. When he reached Naukabandan (ancient town) near Kaunsarnag (in Pulwama District of South Kashmir), the Nagas appealed to him for help. Since the demon was invincible within water, the Rishi performed great penance to secure divine intervention. His prayer was granted and Lord Vishnu (Hindu Deity of preservation and maintenance of the universe), assuming the form of a boar (varah), pierced the mountain to the west of the lake at a place called Varahamula (present Baramulla) with his trident and water drained away through the resulting gorge. As the lake dried, Jalodbhava could not hide any more and was killed by the gods. The valley that emerged from draining the lake came to be known as Kashyap Mar, meaning, 'the abode of Kashyap." In the language of the people over a period of time, Kashyap Mar became 'Kashmir', the present name of the valley.|accessdate = 2010-07-01}}</ref> lived a demon called Jalodbhava (meaning "born of water"), who tortured and devoured the people, who lived near mountain slopes.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava">{{Cite book|url = http://books.google.com/books?id=tuYsVSY44O0C&pg=PA23&dq=kashmir+kashyap#v=onepage&q=kashmir%20kashyap&f=false|author=S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava|title=Land & People of Indian States & Union Territories|publisher =Kalpaz Publications|quote=According to the oldest extant book on Kashmir, "Nilmat Puran", in the Satisar lived a demon called Jalod Bowa, who tortured and devoured the people, who lived near mountain slopes. Hearing the suffering of the people, a great saint of our country, Kashyap by name, came to the rescue of the people here. After performing penance for a long time, the saint was blessed, and he was able to cut the mountain near Varahmulla, which blocked the water of the lake from flowing into the plains below. The lake was drained, the land appeared, and the demon was killed. The saint encouraged people from India to settle in the valley. The people named the valley as Kashyap-Mar and Kashyap-Pura. The name Kashmir also implies land desicated from water: "ka" (the water) and shimeera (to desicate). The ancient Greeks called it "Kasperia" and the Chinese pilgrim Hien-Tsang who visited the valley around 631 A.D. called it "KaShi-Mi-Lo" (迦濕彌羅國). In modern times the people of Kashmir have shortened it into "Kasheer" in their tongue.|accessdate = 2010-07-01}}</ref> Hearing the suffering of the people, [[Kashyap]], a [[Saraswat Brahmin]], came to the rescue of the people that lived there.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> After performing penance for a long time, the saint was blessed, and therefore [[Lord Vishnu]] assumed the [[Varaha|form of a boar]] and struck the mountain at [[Baramulla|Varahamula]], boring an opening in it for the water to flow out into the plains below.<ref name="M. K. Kaw, Kashmir Education, Culture, and Science Society">{{Cite book|url = http://books.google.com/books?id=QpjKpK7ywPIC&pg=PA6&dq=Baramulla+boar#v=onepage&q=Baramulla%20boar&f=false|title=Kashmir and its people: studies in the evolution of Kashmiri society|publisher =A.P.H. Publishing Corporation|quote=That the valley of Kashmir was once a vast lake, known as "Satisaras", the lake of Parvati (consort of Shiva), is enshrined in our traditions. There are many mythological stories connected with the desiccation of the lake, before the valley was fit for habitation. The narratives make it out that it was occupied by a demon 'Jalodbhava', till Lord Vishnu assumed the form of a boar and struck the mountain at Baramulla (ancient Varahamula) boring an opening in it for the water to flow out.|accessdate = 2010-07-01}}</ref> The lake was drained, the land appeared, and the [[demon]] was killed.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> The saint encouraged people from India to settle in the valley.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> As a result of the hero's actions, the people named the valley as "Kashyap-Mar", meaning abode of Kashyap, and "Kashyap-Pura", meaning city of Kashyap, in [[Sanskrit]].<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> The name "Kashmir," in Sanskrit, implies land desiccated from water: "ka" (the water) and shimeera (to desiccate).<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> The ancient Greeks began referring to the region as "Kasperia" and the Chinese pilgrim [[Hiuen-Tsang|Hien-Tsang]] who visited the valley around 631 AD. called it "KaShi-Mi-Lo" 迦濕彌羅.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> In modern times the [[Kashmiri people|people of Kashmir]] have shortened the full Sanskrit name into "Kasheer," which is the colloquial [[Kashmiri language|Koshur]] name of the valley, as noted in [[Aurel Stein]]'s introduction to the ''[[Rajatarangini]]'' metrical chronicle.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/>
+
The word Kashmir is an ancient [[Sanskrit]] word which literally means Land of [[Kashyap]] Rishi. [[Kashyap]] Rishi was a [[Saraswat Brahmin]] and one of the [[Saptarshi]]s, who was key in formalizing the ancient [[Historical Vedic Religion]]. The [[Kashmiri Pandits]] are his descendants and have named the valley after him, in his honour. According to the "Nilmat [[Puranas|Puran]]," the oldest book on Kashmir, in the Satisar, a former lake in the Kashmir Valley meaning "lake of the Goddess [[Dakshayani|Sati]],"<ref name="Bansi Pandit">{{Cite book|url = http://books.google.com/books?id=zsoC6GWr47QC&pg=PA17&dq=kashmir+kashyap#v=onepage&q=kashmir%20kashyap&f=false|author=Bansi Pandit|title=Explore Kashmiri Pandits|publisher =Dharma Publications|quote=According to the Nilmat Purana, the sixth century Sanskrit Classic, the present day Kashmir valley was a large lake (called Satisar, meaning 'the lake of Goddess Sati', the consort of Lord Shiva) surrounded by gigantic snow peaked mountains. The lake was inhabitaed by a giant demon, called Jalodbhava (i.e., 'born of water'). He devoured and terrotized the Nagas (Aborigines/Tribes), who lived in the mountains surrounding the lake. It is said that the Kashyap Rishi (grandson of Lord Brahma, the creator of the universe) once went on a pilgrimage to Kashmir. When he reached Naukabandan (ancient town) near Kaunsarnag (in Pulwama District of South Kashmir), the Nagas appealed to him for help. Since the demon was invincible within water, the Rishi performed great penance to secure divine intervention. His prayer was granted and Lord Vishnu (Hindu Deity of preservation and maintenance of the universe), assuming the form of a boar (varah), pierced the mountain to the west of the lake at a place called Varahamula (present Baramulla) with his trident and water drained away through the resulting gorge. As the lake dried, Jalodbhava could not hide any more and was killed by the gods. The valley that emerged from draining the lake came to be known as Kashyap Mar, meaning, 'the abode of Kashyap." In the language of the people over a period of time, Kashyap Mar became 'Kashmir', the present name of the valley.|accessdate = 2010-07-01}}</ref> lived a demon called Jalodbhava (meaning "born of water"), who tortured and devoured the people, who lived near mountain slopes.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava">{{Cite book|url = http://books.google.com/books?id=tuYsVSY44O0C&pg=PA23&dq=kashmir+kashyap#v=onepage&q=kashmir%20kashyap&f=false|author=S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava|title=Land & People of Indian States & Union Territories|publisher =Kalpaz Publications|quote=According to the oldest extant book on Kashmir, "Nilmat Puran", in the Satisar lived a demon called Jalod Bowa, who tortured and devoured the people, who lived near mountain slopes. Hearing the suffering of the people, a great saint of our country, Kashyap by name, came to the rescue of the people here. After performing penance for a long time, the saint was blessed, and he was able to cut the mountain near Varahmulla, which blocked the water of the lake from flowing into the plains below. The lake was drained, the land appeared, and the demon was killed. The saint encouraged people from India to settle in the valley. The people named the valley as Kashyap-Mar and Kashyap-Pura. The name Kashmir also implies land desicated from water: "ka" (the water) and shimeera (to desicate). The ancient Greeks called it "Kasperia" and the Chinese pilgrim Hien-Tsang who visited the valley around 631 A.D. called it "KaShi-Mi-Lo" (迦濕彌羅國). In modern times the people of Kashmir have shortened it into "Kasheer" in their tongue.|accessdate = 2010-07-01}}</ref> Hearing the suffering of the people, [[Kashyap]], a [[Saraswat Brahmin]], came to the rescue of the people that lived there.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> After performing penance for a long time, the saint was blessed, and therefore [[Lord Vishnu]] assumed the [[Varaha|form of a boar]] and struck the mountain at [[Baduckramulla|Varahamula]], boring an opening in it for the water to flow out into the plains below.<ref name="M. K. Kaw, Kashmir Education, Culture, and Science Society">{{Cite book|url = http://books.google.com/books?id=QpjKpK7ywPIC&pg=PA6&dq=Baramulla+boar#v=onepage&q=Baramulla%20boar&f=false|title=Kashmir and its people: studies in the evolution of Kashmiri society|publisher =A.P.H. Publishing Corporation|quote=That the valley of Kashmir was once a vast lake, known as "Satisaras", the lake of Parvati (consort of Shiva), is enshrined in our traditions. There are many mythological stories connected with the desiccation of the lake, before the valley was fit for habitation. The narratives make it out that it was occupied by a demon 'Jalodbhava', till Lord Vishnu assumed the form of a boar and struck the mountain at Baramulla (ancient Varahamula) boring an opening in it for the water to flow out.|accessdate = 2010-07-01}}</ref> The lake was drained, the land appeared, and the [[demon]] was killed.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> The saint encouraged people from India to settle in the valley.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> As a result of the hero's actions, the people named the valley as "Kashyap-Mar", meaning abode of Kashyap, and "Kashyap-Pura", meaning city of Kashyap, in [[Sanskrit]].<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> The name "Kashmir," in Sanskrit, implies land desiccated from water: "ka" (the water) and shimeera (to desiccate).<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> The ancient Greeks began referring to the region as "Kasperia" and the Chinese pilgrim [[Hiuen-Tsang|Hien-Tsang]] who visited the valley around 631 AD. called it "KaShi-Mi-Lo" 迦濕彌羅.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/> In modern times the [[Kashmiri people|people of Kashmir]] have shortened the full Sanskrit name into "Kasheer," which is the colloquial [[Kashmiri language|Koshur]] name of the valley, as noted in [[Aurel Stein]]'s introduction to the ''[[Rajatarangini]]'' metrical chronicle.<ref name="S.C. Bhatt, Gopal Bhargava"/>
   
 
The "[[Rajatarangini]]," a history of Kashmir written by [[Kalhana]] in the 12th century, concurs with Nilmat Puran, stating that the valley of Kashmir was formerly a lake. This lake was drained by the great [[rishi]] or sage, [[Kashyap]], son of Marichi, son of [[Brahma]], by cutting the gap in the hills at Baramulla (''Varaha-mula''). [[Cashmere (disambiguation)|Cashmere]] is a variant spelling of Kashmir, especially within the English language.<ref name="OED">"Kashmir." ''The Oxford English Dictionary''. 2nd ed. 1989.</ref>
 
The "[[Rajatarangini]]," a history of Kashmir written by [[Kalhana]] in the 12th century, concurs with Nilmat Puran, stating that the valley of Kashmir was formerly a lake. This lake was drained by the great [[rishi]] or sage, [[Kashyap]], son of Marichi, son of [[Brahma]], by cutting the gap in the hills at Baramulla (''Varaha-mula''). [[Cashmere (disambiguation)|Cashmere]] is a variant spelling of Kashmir, especially within the English language.<ref name="OED">"Kashmir." ''The Oxford English Dictionary''. 2nd ed. 1989.</ref>
Reason: ANN scored at 0.894781
Reporter Information
Reporter: Mark (anonymous)
Date: Thursday, the 12th of May 2016 at 08:39:44 AM
Status: Reported
Thursday, the 12th of May 2016 at 08:39:44 AM #104350
Mark (anonymous)

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