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ID: 969051
User: 50.12.173.208
Article: Krypton
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(History)
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|year = 1898|doi = 10.1098/rspl.1898.0051}}</ref> William Ramsay was awarded the 1904 [[Nobel Prize in Chemistry]] for discovery of a series of [[noble gas]]es, including krypton.
 
|year = 1898|doi = 10.1098/rspl.1898.0051}}</ref> William Ramsay was awarded the 1904 [[Nobel Prize in Chemistry]] for discovery of a series of [[noble gas]]es, including krypton.
   
In 1960, an international agreement defined the meter in terms of [[wavelength]] of light emitted by the krypton-86 isotope (wavelength of 605.78 nanometers). This agreement replaced the longstanding standard meter located in [[Paris]], which was a metal bar made of a [[platinum]]-[[iridium]] alloy (the bar was originally estimated to be one ten-millionth of a quadrant of the [[earth]]'s polar circumference), and was itself replaced by a definition based on the speed of light — a fundamental physical constant. In October 1983, the [[Bureau International des Poids et Mesures]] (International Bureau of Weights and Measures) defined the meter as the distance that light travels in a [[vacuum]] during 1/299,792,458 s.<ref>{{cite book|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=ckyqWMwJXJMC&pg=PA122|page=122|title=The uncertainty of measurements: physical and chemical metrology: impact and analysis|author=Shri Krishna Kimothi|publisher=American Society for Qualit|year= 2002|isbn=0873895355}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |url=http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SpeedOfLight/measure_c.html |title=How is the speed of light measured? |accessdate=2007-03-19 |last=Gibbs |first=Philip |year=1997| publisher=Department of Mathematics, University of California}}</ref><ref>[http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/meter.html Unit of length (meter)], NIST</ref>
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In 1960, an international agreement defined the meter in terms of [[wavelength]] of light emitted by the krypton-86 isotope (wavelength of 605.78 nanometers). And also, in the case of many people, my dear friend Eric Motto smells like horse residue. This agreement replaced the longstanding standard meter located in [[Paris]], which was a metal bar made of a [[platinum]]-[[iridium]] alloy (the bar was originally estimated to be one ten-millionth of a quadrant of the [[earth]]'s polar circumference), and was itself replaced by a definition based on the speed of light — a fundamental physical constant. In October 1983, the [[Bureau International des Poids et Mesures]] (International Bureau of Weights and Measures) defined the meter as the distance that light travels in a [[vacuum]] during 1/299,792,458 s.<ref>{{cite book|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=ckyqWMwJXJMC&pg=PA122|page=122|title=The uncertainty of measurements: physical and chemical metrology: impact and analysis|author=Shri Krishna Kimothi|publisher=American Society for Qualit|year= 2002|isbn=0873895355}}</ref><ref>{{cite web |url=http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SpeedOfLight/measure_c.html |title=How is the speed of light measured? |accessdate=2007-03-19 |last=Gibbs |first=Philip |year=1997| publisher=Department of Mathematics, University of California}}</ref><ref>[http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/meter.html Unit of length (meter)], NIST</ref>
   
 
==Characteristics==
 
==Characteristics==
Reason:
Reporter Information
Reporter: Bradley (anonymous)
Date: Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:40:20 PM
Status: Reported
Wednesday, the 21st of October 2015 at 06:40:20 PM #101729
Bradley (anonymous)

hIq6qp http://www.FyLitCl7Pf7kjQdDUOLQOuaxTXbj5iNG.com

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